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Which clippings match 'Bracelet' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman by Dara Birnbaum

"Explosive bursts of fire open Technology/Transformation, an incendiary deconstruction of the ideology embedded in television form and pop cultural iconography. Appropriating imagery from the 1970s TV series Wonder Woman, Birnbaum isolates and repeats the moment of the 'real' woman's symbolic transformation into super-hero. Entrapped in her magical metamorphosis by Birnbaum's stuttering edits, Wonder Woman spins dizzily like a music-box doll. Through radical manipulation of this female Pop icon, she subverts its meaning within the television text. Arresting the flow of images through fragmentation and repetition, Birnbaum condenses the comic-book narrative — Wonder Woman deflects bullets off her bracelets, 'cuts' her throat in a hall of mirrors — distilling its essence to allow the subtext to emerge. In a further textual deconstruction, she spells out the words to the song Wonder Woman in Discoland on the screen. The lyrics' double entendres ('Get us out from under... Wonder Woman') reveal the sexual source of the superwoman's supposed empowerment: 'Shake thy Wonder Maker.' Writing about the 'stutter-step progression of 'extended moments' of transformation from Wonder Woman,' Birnbaum states, 'The abbreviated narrative — running, spinning, saving a man — allows the underlying theme to surface: psychological transformation versus television product. Real becomes Wonder in order to 'do good' (be moral) in an (a) or (im)moral society.'"

(Electronic Arts Intermix)

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1970s1978 • abbreviated narrative • appropriationbracelet • comic book narrative • critical appropriation • cultural subversion • Dara Birnbaum • deconstruction • discoland • double entendre • Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) • extended moments • feminist artfeminist critiquefirefragmentation • hall of mirrors • incendiary device • influential video artists • magical metamorphosis • metamorphosis • music-box doll • pop cultural iconography • pop culture artpop icon • psychological transformation • radical manipulationrepeating formrepeating patternrepetitionrunning • saving a man • sexual empowerment • Sony Portapak • spinningstutter-step progressionstuttering editssubversion • super hero • symbolic transformation • Technology Transformation Wonder Woman (1978) • television form • television imagery • television product • television text • textual deconstruction • TV series • underlying theme • video artvideo artistvideo artwork • Wonder Woman (television programme)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2011

Fantastic Planet: political allegory of human regression and rebirth

"A winner of the Cannes Film Festival 1973, 'Fantastic Planet' is a full length animated fantasy set on the planet of the Draags in a far–off solar system where humans are kept as pets by a race of huge blue creatures."

(Alice in Videoland)

Fig.1–8 René Laloux and Roland Topor (1973). 'Fantastic Planet/La Planète Sauvage'. France: 72 mins.

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1973alienalien raceallegoryanimationattackbluebraceletCannes Film FestivalchildrencollarcommunicationCzechoslovakiadomesticated • Draags • drawingexodusextermination • Fantastic Planet • fantasyfilm • fragile • fragilityFrancefuturehumanhumanoidimaginary worlds • Jiri Trnka Studio • knowledge • La Planete Sauvage • lethal • master and slave • meditationnew technology • Oms • Oms en serie • peacepetplanetpolitical allegorypost-apocalyptic scenariorebirthregression • Rene Laloux • reversal of fortune • Roland Topor • savage • scalescience fictionsocietyspeculative fictionspiritsstatue • Stefan Wul • stop framesymbolism • Terr • Tiva • tribevisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2009

Charmed: A Case Study of Interactive Jewellery

Hazel White's "work investigates how interactive jewellery can be integrated into our lives. Whilst most studies into wearable technology have focussed on how the technology can be miniaturised, the Charmed project looks into what exactly it is that users want from this technology – from storytelling to transportation devices to whatever else they may think of – and how it can be incorporated into users' everyday wardrobes in a way that allows an emotional involvement of the sort we might associate with 'ordinary' jewellery.

In order to address the question, Hazel has developed a series of 'charm' jewellery incorporating bracelets, necklaces, pins, or even keyrings. The charms were then given to a variety of different participants – from technophobes to technophiles, and from jewellery wearers to non–wearers – along with a pack that allowed them to log their responses. The participants themselves were allowed to choose the type of jewellery they received and how it would be worn, leading to a greater engagement with the pack and the project.

Through interviews with the applicants, Hazel was able to demonstrate that a user centred approach – working closely with the people who would wear the jewellery and responding and adapting according to their observations, values and needs – can lead to suggestions for interactive jewellery which can be experienced on multiple levels: from cultural, social and personal resonances to the narrative carried by the object and the physical interaction with the jewellery."

(AHRC, UK)

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AHRCbraceletcalm technologycase study • Charmed • creative practicedecorative artsdesigndevice • Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art • emotional involvementenquiryexperimentationfashionform • Hazel White • industrial designinteraction • interactive jewellery • jewellery • keyring • narrative • necklace • objectproduct designresearch • technophile • technophobe • theory buildingUKUniversity of Dundeeusability • user centred approach • user-centredwearable technologies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 APRIL 2005

Mbracelet: Wearable Computing

pixelpeppy – ion constas – dana chang – helena papadopoulos
The mbracelet is able to store, share and collect information. At the same time it can be worn as a fashion accessory. It has 3 slots that can receive interchangeable iButtons (developed by Dallas Semiconductors). This enables users to customize the information they want to "carry" with them at any given time. A 2–wire interface is sufficient for the iButtons to make contact with a host unit, thus allowing for an easily implemented infrastructure.

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accessoryATMbraceletfashion • mbracelet • sharetransferwearable computingworn
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