Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Digital Artefacts' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 JULY 2013

XFR STN (Transfer Station) at the New Museum in New York

"The New Museum is accepting requests from the public for digital preservation of artist–produced moving image and born–digital content. Appointments for transfer and recovery are available from July 17 through September 8, 2013, transfers occur as part of the exhibition/lab 'XFR STN' ...

All moving image materials that are digitized as part of the exhibition will be made publicly available by the New Museum on the Internet Archive, a nonprofit institution whose mission includes offering 'free and open access to all the world's knowledge' and to provide permanent access for researchers, historians, scholars, people with disabilities, and the general public to cultural heritage collections. All artists submitting moving image materials will be able to download preservation–grade digital versions of their materials from the Internet Archive. Born–digital materials that are digitized as part of the exhibition can be made available by the New Museum on the Internet Archive at the artist's discretion. As part of 'XFR STN,' selections from the digitized content posted on the Internet Archive will be informally screened in the exhibition galleries."

Fig.1 Matthew Geller answering phones during the live call–in segment of Cara Perlman's End of the World show, produced for Potato Wolf, a project of Colab TV, ca. 1978

1

TAGS

2013 • aging material • analogue and digital formatsanalogue mediaarchivingaudiovisualBetacam SPborn-digitalcompact disccultural collecting organisationscultural heritagecultural heritage collectionsdigital artefactsdigital formatdigital heritagedigital preservationdigital video • digital videotape • digitisation project • digitisation services • early recording technologyfloppy diskInternet Archive • Iomega Jaz • Iomega Zip • media capture • media distributionmedia formatmedia past • media recovery • media storage • MiniDV • Monday/Wednesday/Friday Video Club • moving image transfer • MWF • New Museum of Contemporary ArtNew YorkNTSCobsolete mediumpreservation • preservation moving image materials • preserving the pastrecent past • Sony Hi8 • technology convergence • U-Matic • VHSvideo archivevideo artists • video transfer • videotape • visual arts • XFR STN

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JUNE 2013

1980s chiptune easter egg rediscovered in NZ washing machines

"Twenty years of patriotism on the part of Fisher & Paykel has been revealed thanks to a viral social media video that shows its washing machines can play the national anthem. A video posted on YouTube by a woman on Tuesday has received more than 165,000 hits. The woman explains how to make the washing machine play the New Zealand national anthem.

Fisher & Paykel marketing manager Sonya Aitken said the machines, which can also play the United States and Australian anthems, were programmed to play tunes by the company's engineers for demonstration purposes. ... While the singing machines were used to draw customers' attention in stores 20 years ago, it was no longer part of sales techniques, so the feature had essentially been forgotten and then rediscovered, she said."

(Laura Walters, 21/06/2013, Fairfax NZ News)

1

TAGS

1980s8-bit • Advance Australia Fair • anthem • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralia • Beverly Hills Cop (1984) • chiptunecultural significance of objectsdigital archaeologydigital artefactsdomestic material objecteaster egg • Fisher and Paykel • God Defend New Zealand • hidden feature • Home of the Brave • how to do thingsmusic making technology • national anthem • obsolescenceordinary manufactured objectoutgrownpatriotism • power surge • rediscoveredremainderremains of the past • sales technique • social media • Sonya Aitken • tune • United Statesuseless machinesviral video • washing machine • what is left of the pastwhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Archaeology: graphic artefacts from our recent past

"Internet Archaeology seeks to explore, recover, archive and showcase the graphic artifacts found within earlier Internet Culture. Established in 2009, the chief purpose of Internet Archaeology is to preserve these artifacts and acknowledge their importance in understanding the beginnings and birth of an Internet Culture. We focus on graphic artifacts only, with the belief that images are most culturally revealing and immediate. Most of the files in our archive are in either JPG or GIF format and are categorized by either still or moving image, they are then arranged in various thematic subcategories. Currently, a major focus of Internet Archaeology is on the archiving and indexing of images found on Geocities websites, as their existence has been terminated by parent company Yahoo; who discontinued GeoCities operation on October 26, 2009. Internet Archaeology is an ongoing effort which puts preservation paramount. Unlike traditional archaeology, where physical artifacts are unearthed; Internet Archaeology's artifacts are digital, thus more temporal and transient. Yet we believe that these artifacts are no less important than say the cave paintings of Lascaux. They reveal the origins of a now ubiquitous Internet Culture; showing where we have been and how far we have come."

(Internet Archaeology)

Via Chelsea Nichols [http://ridiculouslyinteresting.wordpress.com/2011/11/26/internet–archaeology–the–best–of–90s–internet–graphics/]

1

TAGS

1990s200920th century phenomenaaestheticsarchaeologyarchivearchiving • archiving and indexing • artefactcave paintingscultural codes • culturally revealing • cyber archaeologycyberculturedigital anthropologydigital artefactsdigital cultureemergence of the webGeocitiesGIF format • graphic artefacts • graphic artifacts • graphic designimagesindexindexingInternetinternet archaeologyinternet culture • JPG • JPG format • Lascauxnew mediaobsolescencepreservationrecent pasttransiencevisual designweb designweb pagesweb publishingYahoo!

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 APRIL 2011

The Digital Preservation Coalition: securing the preservation of digital resources in the UK

"The Digital Preservation Coalition was established in 2001 to foster joint action to address the urgent challenges of securing the preservation of digital resources in the UK and to work with others internationally to secure our global digital memory and knowledge base. Established as a not–for–profit membership organisation the coalition provides a mechanism by which members can work together to realise the opportunities of long term access."

(Digital Preservation Coalition)

1

TAGS

2001accessarchivingbrokercultural collecting organisationscultural heritagecultural heritage collectionsdigitaldigital artefactsdigital assetsdigital formatdigital heritage • digital memory • digital preservation • Digital Preservation Coalition • digital resources • DPC • global digital memory • knowledge basemedia artmedia pastnew medianot-for-profitobsolescenceold mediaorganisationpreservation • preservation of digital resources • preserving the pasttechnologyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2009

JISC infoNet : What are e-Portfolios?

"If portfolios are 'simply a collection of documents relating to a learner's progress, development and achievements' (Beetham 2005) then e–portfolios could be defined as simply digital collections of these documents. However, ideas of what an e–portfolio 'is' are complex and to an extent the definition and purpose will vary depending on the perspective from which a particular person is approaching the concept. Consensus is beginning to grow as experience of e–portfolios develops which will help converge these different ideas and definitions.

"An e–portfolio is a purposeful aggregation of digital items – ideas, evidence, reflections, feedback etc, which 'presents' a selected audience with evidence of a person's learning and/or ability." Sutherland and Powell (2007)

A helpful starting point is to distinguish between e–portfolios as products, e–portfolios as tools or systems and the processes associated with e–portfolio development although they are intrinsically linked and in the case of product and process, interdependent.

Essentially then, an e–portfolio is a product created by learners, a collection of digital artefacts articulating learning (both formal and informal), experiences and achievements. Learners create 'presentational' e–portfolios by using e–portfolio tools or systems. As part of this production process, learners can be inherently supported to develop one or more key skills such as collecting, selecting, reflecting, sharing, collaborating, annotating and presenting – these can be described as e–portfolio–related processes. Definitions of an e–portfolio tend to include the concepts of learners drawing from both informal and formal learning activities to create their e–portfolios, which are personally managed and owned by the learner, and where items can be selectively shared with other parties such as peers, teachers, assessors and employers."

(JISC infoNet, UK)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.