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13 OCTOBER 2017

What is discourse analysis? by Dr Stephanie Taylor

Stephanie Taylor, NCRMUK, Published on 27 Mar 2015

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TAGS

2015academic researchacademic scholarship • AQMeN Centre • Cathie Marsh Centre • content analysisdata analysisdiscourse analysis • discursive resource • Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) • interpretive repertoire • methodological approaches • methodological research • National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM)NCRM • NCRMUK • research methodssocial phenomenasocial phenomenon • social product • social sciencesocial science research • social science research methods • Stephanie Taylor • talktext dataUniversity of EdinburghUniversity of ManchesterUniversity of Southamptonutterances

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JUNE 2016

The Materiality of Research: 'Woven into the Fabric of the Text: Subversive Material Metaphors in Academic Writing'

"In the social sciences, though, often we write about our research as if theories and arguments are buildings. Theories have frameworks and foundations and they need support. Arguments can be constructed, shored up by facts and buttressed with a solid line of reasoning. Sometimes they can be shaky and even fall down. But as well as communicating what we mean, metaphors structure our thinking. Or, at least, the metaphors we choose when we write can reveal a great deal about underlying assumptions. The theories-as-buildings metaphor always makes me imagine an enormous wall made of rectangular bricks, orderly and straight, progressing upwards and onwards. The researcher's job is to climb the scaffolding, find a gap near the top and make a brick to fill it, or to knock a few crumbling bricks out and replace them with others, strong and freshly fired. Or rarely, to grab a spade and start digging a new foundation, because this metaphor doesn't work like Minecraft: bricks can't float, unsupported.

Why does this way of thinking about knowledge hold such sway over us? For one thing, it offers a comforting sense of progress and control. Buildings have blueprints; their construction appears to proceed in a predictable fashion; engineers can calculate precisely where the load bearing walls and lintels need to be; construction workers know how to mix the mortar so it won't crumble. Making buildings is also something that happens in the public sphere; even with houses, the insides only become private when the work is finished and people move in. And though we all know full well that knowledge creation doesn't actually happen in the controlled and predictable way the metaphor implies, this is the structure that it imposes on our writing: an activity that is orderly, involves rationality over emotion and inhabits the public sphere not the private."

(Katie Collins, 27 May 2016)

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2016academic writingaffordances • building metaphors • conceptual metaphorcreative practicecultural practicesfeminine voice • generative practice • integrative practices • Katie Collins • material metaphors • metaphors structure our thinking • needlecraft metaphors • piecing together • predictable fashion • progress narrativesresearch activitiesresearchersewingsocial sciencestitching • theories-as-buildings metaphor • theory building • thinking about knowledge • underlying assumptions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2014

Organisations, practices, actors, and events: Exploring inside the distance running social world

"This paper revisits Unruh's notions of social worlds, exploring the organisations, practices, events and actors involved within the culture of distance running, as an increasingly popular leisure activity. An ethnographic research design was utilised using a combination of interviews, observation and participant observation. Data was collected over a two-year period on a weekly basis at two local distance running clubs, and also at a series of international distance running events. This study examines the distance running world from the 'emic' perspective of the twenty participants involved. The key findings illustrate how the distance running social world permits both development and confirmation of a running identity and, with it, social fulfilment. In addition to the four main components of a distance running social world, this paper highlights a paradox whereby individuals follow an individual pursuit within the social world of the distance running community – highlighting that the focus is on both the individual and the social, an area which sociologists have to date not extensively analysed within the context of sport."

(Richard Shipway, Immy Holloway and Ian Jones, 2013)

Richard Shipway, Immy Holloway, Ian Jones (2013). "Organisations, practices, actors, and events: Exploring inside the distance running social world", International Review for the Sociology of Sport 2013;48 259-276.

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2013anthropology • behavioural science • collective identityDavid Unruh • distance runner • distance running • distance running community • emic • emic perspective • emics • ethnographic researchfield research • folkloristics • group membership • healthy body • healthy mind • Ian Jones • identity production • Immy Holloway • individual pursuit • interview (research method)leisure activity • observer • participant observation • Richard Shipway • running • running body • running club • running community • running identity • serious leisure • social fulfillment • social fulfilment • social groupsocial identity • social identity theory • social sciencesocial worldsocial worldssport and recreation • sport ethnography • sport tourism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 DECEMBER 2013

Ways of Thinking and Organisational Causality

"There are several types or ways of thinking. Each of these ways of thinking comes with its own set of assumptions, or paradigms, that, while making the thinking process work efficiently, also constrains the process to a particular view of causality, organization, and management's and members' roles in an organization. These types of thinking have their roots in natural sciences, social sciences, and philosophies. They can become so pervasive and dominant in management discourse that they become invisible, being applied without consideration for their assumed causality. Clearly identifying and classifying types of thinking raises awareness of what thinking is actually taking place, and at the same time challenges management to improve their thinking based on this knowledge of thinking."

(Kim Korn, Create Advantage Inc.)

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analytical thinking • assumed causality • autonomous human choice • business management • business organisation • causalitycompetitive advantage • competitive positioning • complex responsive processes thinking • complexity science • decision making • formative causality • Georg Hegel • Hegelian philosophy • holistic thinking • identity-difference thinking • imaginative thinkingImmanuel Kant • inside-out thinking • insightintuitionIsaac Newton • Kantian philosophy • knowledge of thinking • knowledge paradigm • management discourse • mechanistic perspective • natural causality • natural sciences • natural systems • organisation causality • organisation evolution • organisational behaviourorganisational capabilities • organisational causality • organisational dynamics • outside-in thinking • part-whole thinkingphilosophypsychological perception • rational choice thinking • rationalist causality • rationalist perspectiverationalist traditionsocial sciencestrategic thinkingsynthetic thinking • system-environment thinking • systemic process thinking • systemic thinking • systems approach • systems science • systems thinking • thinking roles • thinking styles • transformative causality • types of thinking • ways of thinking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2013

New International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation

"International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation is an international publication that provides a forum for discussing the nature and potential of creativity and innovation in design from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Design creativity and innovation is truly an interdisciplinary academic research field that will interest and stimulate researchers of engineering design, industrial design, architecture, art, and similar areas. The journal aims to not only promote existing research disciplines but also pioneer a new one that lies in the intermediate area between the domains of systems engineering, information technology, computer science, social science, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and related fields. The journal welcomes various kinds of research papers (analytical studies, constructive studies, case studies, field studies, literature surveys, etc.) that will establish the basis for the academic discipline of design creativity and innovation."

TAGS

2013academic journal • analogical reasoning • architectural designartificial intelligencecognitive scienceconcept generation • constructive studies • creativity and innovation • design creativity • design creativity and innovation • design educationdesign innovationdesign inspirationdesign researcher • design synthesis • design theoryengineering design • field studies • in-betweenindustrial designinformation technologyinnovative explorations • innovative process • interdisciplinary researchinternational journal • inventive process • inventive worklinguisticsliteraturephilosophypsychology • research field • research papersocial science • systems engineering • Taylor and Francis • theories on design • visual arts research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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