Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Afghanistan' keyword pg.1 of 2
18 OCTOBER 2016

HyperNormalisation: our retreat into a simplified version of the world

"The documentary is inspired by the unpredictable events of recent times – from the rise of Donald Trump to Brexit, the war in Syria, the endless migrant crisis, and random bomb attacks. It seeks to explain both why these chaotic events are happening, and why we and our leaders can't understand them. Curtis's theory is that Westerners - politicians, journalists, experts and members of the public alike - have retreated into a simplified, and often completely fake version of the world. But because it is all-encompassing, we accept it as normal.

HyperNormalisation explores this hollow world by looking back at 40 years of events, and profiling a diverse cast of characters such as: the Assad dynasty, Donald Trump, Henry Kissinger, Patti Smith, the early performance artists in New York, President Putin, intelligent machines, Japanese gangsters and suicide bombers."

(Holly Barrett, 22nd September 2016, Royal Television Society)

1

TAGS

20169/11 • Acid Phreak (pseudonym) • Adam CurtisAfghanistan • AirBnB • Alexei Yurchak • Anthony GiddensArab Spring • Arkady Strugatsky • BBC documentary • BBC iPlayer • Boris Strugatsky • Brexit • British filmmaker • British National Front • Carl Rogers • cartoon villain • chaos • chaotic events • chatbot • civil rights movement • Corrupt (pseudonym) • cyber activism • cyberspace • Damascus • David Frost • Declaration of Independence in Cyberspace • delusion • digital rightsdisruptive innovationdocumentaryDonald Trump • Eli Ladopoulos • ELIZA (natural language processing) • fakeness • functioning society • Gulf War • HAC (pseudonym) • Hafez al-Assad • Henry Kissinger • hippies • hypernormalisation • HyperNormalisation (2016) • intelligent machines • internet utopianismIraq • John Barlow • John Lee • Joseph Weizenbaum • Judea Pearl • Julio Fernandez • late communist period • Lester Coleman • liability theory • Lionel Ritchie • machine fetishisation • Mark Abene • Martha Rosler • Masters of Deception (MOD) • migrant crisis • Muammar Gaddafi • Muslim Brotherhood • New YorkNigel FarageOccupy Wall Street • Outlaw (pseudonym) • paradoxPatti Smith • Paul Stira • performance artists • Phiber Optik (pseudonym) • powerlesspretence • random bomb attacks • retreat into simplified views of the world • Roadside Picnic (1972) • Ronald Reagan • Royal Television Society • Scorpion (pseudonym) • self-absorbed baby boomers • self-fulfilling prophecy • Soviet UnionStalker (1979)suicide bombersSyria • Tahir Square • techno-panic • techno-utopiaterrorism • time of great uncertainty • Timothy LearyTron • Uber • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkov • War in Syria • Yakuza

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JULY 2016

The Trap: What Happened to Our Dream of Freedom?

"Individual freedom is the dream of our age. It's what our leaders promise to give us, it defines how we think of ourselves and, repeatedly, we have gone to war to impose freedom around the world. But if you step back and look at what freedom actually means for us today, it's a strange and limited kind of freedom.

Politicians promised to liberate us from the old dead hand of bureaucracy, but they have created an evermore controlling system of social management, driven by targets and numbers. Governments committed to freedom of choice have presided over a rise in inequality and a dramatic collapse in social mobility. And abroad, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the attempt to enforce freedom has led to bloody mayhem and the rise of an authoritarian anti-democratic Islamism. This, in turn, has helped inspire terrorist attacks in Britain. In response, the Government has dismantled long-standing laws designed to protect our freedom.

The Trap is a series of three films by Bafta-winning producer Adam Curtis that explains the origins of our contemporary, narrow idea of freedom. It shows how a simplistic model of human beings as self-seeking, almost robotic, creatures led to today's idea of freedom. This model was derived from ideas and techniques developed by nuclear strategists during the Cold War to control the behavior of the Soviet enemy."

1
2
3
4

TAGS

2007 • A Beautiful Mind (2001) • Adam CurtisAfghanistan • anti-democratic • authoritarianismBBC Two • bloody mayhem • cold war • contemporary idea of freedom • controlling system • deterministic logicdocumentary seriesexplicit objectivesfreedom of choicegame theory • goal-oriented agenda • government policygrand political dreamhuman behaviourindividual freedomindividualismIraqIslamism • John Nash • limited kind of freedom • mathematical modelmetricisation • narrow idea of freedom • neoliberalism • nuclear strategists • operational criteriaoversimplificationpersonal freedom • point of equilibrium • rational self-interest • Ronald David Laing • self-monitoring • simplistic model • social inequality • social management • social mobility • Soviet Union • state control • systems theory • target-oriented agenda • targets and numbers • the dream of our age

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 DECEMBER 2015

Adam Curtis: our defeatist response to contradictory narratives

"So much of the news this year [2014] has been hopeless, depressing and above all confusing. To which the only response is 'Oh Dear' But what this film is going to suggest is that defeatist response has become a central part of a new system of political control and to understand how this is happening you have to look to Russia and to a man called Vladislav Surkov who is a hero of our time. Surkov is one of President Putin's advisors and has helped him maintain his power for fifteen years, but he has done it in a very new way. He came originally from the avant-garde art world and those who have studied his career say that what Surkov has done is import ideas from conceptual art into the very heart of politics."

1
2

TAGS

2014Adam CurtisAfghanistanapathyausterity measuresavant-garde art • Bashar al-Assad • bewildering • British troops • Chancellor of the Exchequer • Charlie Brooker • conceptual artconfusion tacticsconspiracy theoriesconstant changecontradictory narratives • contradictory vaudeville • controlcrimedaesh • defeatism • defeatist response • destabilised perceptiondisc jockey • ebola • economy • evil enemy • financial crimes • George Osbornehuman agencyhyperrealityincoherencemedia machine • non-linear war • non-linear world • perceptions of realitypolitical control • political strategy • post-traditional societypublic thought • quantitative easing • Russia • Russian politics • ruthless elite • shapeshiftingsimulacrasmokescreen • strategy of power • Syria • those in power • Ukraineuncertainty • undermine perceptions • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkovwhat is really happening

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2015

Bitter Lake by Adam Curtis: how the West fooled itself

"My aim is to try to get people to look at those fragments of recorded moments from Afghanistan in a new and fresh way. I do feel that the way many factual programmes on TV are edited and constructed has become so rigid and formulaic – that the audiences don't really look at them any more. The template is so familiar.

I am using these techniques to both amplify and express the wider argument of Bitter Lake. It is that those in power in our society have so simplified the stories they tell themselves, and us, about the world that they have in effect lost touch with reality. That they have reduced the world to an almost childlike vision of a battle between good and evil.

This was the story that those who invaded Afghanistan carried with them and tried to impose there – and as a result they really could not see what was staring them in the face: a complex society where different groups had been involved in a bloody civil war for over 30 years. A world where no one was simply good or bad. But those in charge ignored all that – and out of it came a military and political disaster.

But the film also tries to show why Western politicians have so simplified the world. Because Afghanistan's recent past is also a key that unlocks an epic hidden history of the postwar world."

(Adam Curtis, 24 January 2015, The Telegraph)

1

2

3

TAGS

1945 • 1970s America • 1973Adam CurtisAfghanistanArab • BBC iPlayer-only • Bedouin • Bitter Lake (2015) • bitter rivalries • caliphate • Come Down To Us (Burial 2013) • complex problems • deal • destabilised politics • documentarydocumentary film • dreamlike documentary style • drone • epic moment • footageFranklin D. Roosevelt • generations to come • global capitalismglobal politics • good versus evil • grand hypothesis • grand political dream • Helmand • ideology • imagined past • Islamic fundamentalism • Islamism • Kabul • King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia • Malcolm Tucker • Margaret ThatcherMiddle Eastmilitary intervention • Pashtun • Perry Mason • Phil Goodwin • Pushtun • recorded moments • Ronald ReaganSaudi Arabia • simplified stories • Solaris (1972) • Suez Canal • Wahhabi Islam • Wahhabism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JULY 2010

One Man's Mission to Fight Terrorism One School at a Time

"BILL MOYERS: But this intrigues me because you've set out over these years to educate young girls primarily. I mean, you do have some boys in your schools, but primarily your goal is to educate young girls. And given the fact that the Afghani and Pakistani societies are so male dominated, that men run the families, they run the government, they run the villages, they run the Taliban, why focus on girls instead of the men who are going to, in that culture, grow up and run things?

GREG MORTENSON: Well, it's obviously the boys need education also. But as a child in Africa, I learned a proverb. And it says, 'If we educate a boy, we educate an individual. But if we can educate a girl, we educate a community.' And what that means is when girls grow up, become a mother, they are the ones who promote the value of education in the community. The education of girls has very powerful impacts in a society. Number one, the infant mortality's reduced. Number two, the population is reduced. The third thing is the quality of health improves. And, from my own observation, when girls learn how to read and write, they often teach their mother how to read and write. Boys, we don't seem to do that as much. They also, you'll see people, kids coming out for the marketplace, have meat or vegetables wrapped in newspaper. And then you'll see the mother very carefully unfolding a newspaper and ask her daughter to read the news to her. And it's the first time that woman is able to get information of what's going on in the outside world around––very powerful to see that. And another compelling reason is when women are educated, they're not as likely to condone or encourage their son to get into violence or into terrorism. In fact, culturally when someone goes on jihad, they should get permission from their mother first. And if they don't, it's very shameful or disgraceful. So when women are educated, as I mentioned, they are less likely to encourage their son to get into violence. And I've seen that happen, Bill, over the last decade in rural areas of Afghanistan, Pakistan. I mean, I could go on all day about this, but educating girls is very powerful."

(Bill Moyers Journal, 15 January 2010, PBS)

1

TAGS

2010 • Admiral Mike Mullen • Afghanistanautonomy • Bill Moyers Journal • civic engagementcommunityculturedemocratic participationeducationemancipationempowermentengagementgender • General David Petraeus • General Stanley McChrystal • Greg Mortenson • humanitarianism • ideologyinspiring peopleIslamic worldjihad • K2 • Kunar • learning • Major General Michael Flynn • mullah • Nuristan • Pakistanparticipation • Pashtunwali code • PBSpeace • Quran • Reverence for Life • schools • Sharia law • Stones into Schools • sustainability • Taliban • Tanzania • teachingterrorism • Three Cups of Tea • traditiontransformation • Urozgan • Urozgan province • war

CONTRIBUTOR

Lindsay Quennell
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.