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29 MARCH 2013

Mathematics is the foundation of activities such as knitting, stitching, measuring and cutting that are crucial to crafting and fabrication

The exhibition "Beauty is the First Test" runs form 27 April – 30 June 2013 at The National Centre for Craft & Design, Navigation Wharf, Carre Street, Sleaford, Lincolnshire NG34, UK.

"The group show explores how mathematical concepts underpin craft techniques, aiming to 'demystify a subject that intimates both adults and children', according to the centre. The exhibition demonstrates how mathematics is the foundation of activities such as knitting, stitching, measuring and cutting that are crucial to crafting and fabrication. Showcasing works in disciplines including textiles and sculpture, the show will feature work from artists including Michael Brennand–Wood, Janice Gunner, Lucy McMullen and Ann Sutton.

Alongside the visual proof that maths can indeed be fun – and pretty – the exhibition also presents case studies of five makers, including Gail Baxter and Margo Selby, exploring how the development of their work was furthered by an understanding and appreciation of mathematics."

(Emily Gosling, 27 March 2013, Design Week)

Fig.1 Janette Matthews, "Optical Ellipse". Fig.2 Ann Sutton, "Four Ways from a Square", 2009.

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2013algorithmic art • Ann Sutton • Beauty is the First Test (exhibition) • computational aestheticscraft techniquescraftingDesign Weekexhibition • fractal art • Gail Baxter • geometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric shapes • Godfrey Hardy • group exhibitionharmony • Janette Matthews • Janice Gunner • knitting • Lesley Halliwell • Lucy McMullen • Margo Selby • mathematical abstractionmathematical conceptsmathematical patternmathematicsmaths • Michael Brennand-Wood • National Centre for Craft and Designpattern • Peter Randall-Page • sculpture • spirograph • Stella Harding • Suresh Dutt • textilesvisual abstractionweaving

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JUNE 2012

Art and Design and Built Environment College Research Conference and Festival: Perspectives on the Material World

"Thursday, 28 June 2012, 09.00 am – 17.30 pm, Exhibition–Newton Central Gallery, Conference–Newton LT3, LT37, LT33 and LT32, Welcome 9 am – 9.30 am in Newton Central Gallery, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.

All University staff, students and guests are invited to come along to this exciting research conference and festival. The conference has a series of parallel sessions of papers organised round research groups, as well as an exhibition.

This year's innovations will include workshop sessions on the seven candidate REF impact case studies, as well as the involvement of the Future Factory. Video art, production engineering, sustainable consumption, C18 textiles, concrete, knitting – all these and more will be the origin of papers in this year's Art and Design and Built Environment College Research Conference and Festival. This rich collection of research has a common concern to understand and shape our relationship to the material world; physically, socially and philosophically."

(Nottingham Trent University)

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TAGS

2012 • academia-industry • Art and Design and Built Environment College Research Conference and Festival • art and design conference • art and intermedia • art practicesbuilt environment • C18 textiles • College of Art and Design and Built Environmentcolloquiaconcreteconference • construction management • construction processes • design and visual culturedesign researcheducation and practice • Future Factory • heritage and architecture • impact case studiesintermediaknittingmaterial worldmaterialitymedical deviceNottingham Trent UniversityNTUpedagogy research • perspectives on the material world • product design • production engineering • real estate • REF • REF impact case studies • research conference and festival • research festival • research groupsshaping our relationship to the material worldsustainable consumption • sustainable technology • understanding our relationship to the material world • video artwearable devicesworkshop sessions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MAY 2011

Knowledge for Innovation Knit e-pedia Knowledge Bank

"The Knowledge Bank provides access to e–learning materials specific to the textile industry. The subjects cover knitting technology, clothing technology, medical textiles, equal opportunities and the role of textiles in the global economy. The content is freely available to companies and individuals"

(William Lee Innovation Centre, Textiles and Paper, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, 2007)

nb. this project was previously located here: http://www.knitepedia.co.uk

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clothing technologycraftcreative industries • e-learning portal • elearning • European Social Fund • global economy • K4I • K4I portal • knit e-pedia • knitting • knitting technology • knowledge bank • knowledge based economy • knowledge for innovation • knowledge repository • Knowledge4Innovation • learning toollegislationmaterials • medical textiles • modular structurepatents • quick reference • reference tool • skillsSMEtechnical knowledgetextile industrytextiles • textiles companies • training resource • UKUniversity of Manchester • William Lee Innovation Centre

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 OCTOBER 2009

Mainstreaming sustainable fashion

"4,5 Katharine Hamnett in a video interview explained how in the late 1980s she had been prompted to check, to make sure the company were not doing any harm. That meant looking at the entire supply chain to make sure that every phase was as good as possible. They had to apply very stringent standards from the very beginning. It started with the farmers given the millions involved in cotton agriculture who are exposed to pesticides, on a daily basis. It lead to focus on organic cotton but regrettably not using silk and considering all the packaging, dyes and printing inks. She has used certification, traceability and accountability, right the way through the supply chain but found taking complete control of this complex supply chain was the only way to enable this. She believed that the most effective to target were the CEO's, of clothing companies and fashion retailers. Mainstreaming sustainable fashion was happening because large retailers were realising that it was increasingly what consumers wanted: products that don't do damage to the environment, or that use child or sweated labour. Retailers ignored this at their peril. Sustainable clothing had to be sophisticated, glamorous and the bottom line was always economic. Sustainable clothing did not have to be more expensive. It could and should be affordable. She though that the ETI labour code should be compulsory and governments should act to have country of origin labelling for fibres."

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art for housewives • art of recyclingbelongingblogbricolagechangecommoditycommunityconsumptioncraft • crochet • Cynthia Korzekwa • design intelligencedesign responsibility • domestic arts • dyeecologyembroideryemotive manipulationengagementenvironmentenvironmentalethicsfashion • fiber arts • folk arthomemadejewelleryjunk art • Katharine Hamnett • knittingmaking art with recycled materialsobsolescenceorganicpaperpesticideproductionprotest • reconstructed fashion • recyclerecyclingremakereusesocial changesocietysustainabilitytextile artstransformation • trashion • urban crafts • waste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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