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Which clippings match 'Folk Art' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 NOVEMBER 2014

Edmund Burke on the sublime

"Some things that move us are beautiful, others are sublime. But the sublime moves us more profoundly than the beautiful. See how Edmund Burke tied the experience of the sublime to the possibility of pain and how the idea went on to influence the artistic Romanticism movement. Voiced by Harry Shearer. Scripted by Nigel Warburton."

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18th centuryaesthetic experienceaesthetic spectacleAge of Enlightenment • apprehension • aristocratic political norms • aristocratic social norms • artistic movementauthenticityawebeautifulChinoiserie • Counter-Enlightenment • Edmund Burke • emotion • European phenomenon • exhilarating experienceexoticexperience of the sublimefolk artfrightening • Harry Shearer • heroic individualism • historical inevitability • historiography • history of ideashorror • imagination to envision and to escape • individual imagination • industrial revolution • intense emotion • intuitionmedieval art • medievalism • musical impromptu • nationalism • natural epistemology of human activities • natural inevitability • natural sciencesnatureNigel Warburtonpicturesque • possibility of pain • representation of ideas • Rococo • romantic era • romantic notion of the artist • romantic period • romantic sublimeromanticism • scientific rationalisation of nature • spontaneity • Sturm und Drang • sublime • sublimity of untamed nature • terror • unfamiliar • urban sprawlvisual artsvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2012

Marshall McLuhan debates his ideas on Australian TV in 1977

"In June 1977 Marshall McLuhan visited Australia and was a guest on Monday Conference, a popular live ABC television show hosted by Robert Moore. McLuhan debated his ideas with Moore and took questions from a feisty studio audience made up of members of the media and advertising industry, including TV boss Bruce Gyngell (see Part One at 14 mins), and young, funky Derryn Hinch (see Part Two from 3 mins).

McLuhan had been brought to Australia to address a broadcasting conference organised by Sydney radio station 2SM, and the Monday Conference was broadcast from the ballroom of the Sydney Hilton Hotel.

Many in the audience clearly admired McLuhan who has well into his prime and at ease with the live television situation. The discussion covered an eclectic range of topics, from television, privacy and Richard Nixon to holograms, transcendental meditation, Jane Austen, Euclidean geometry, denim jeans and nude streaking.

Towards the end of the program the always unpredictable McLuhan can be heard just off–mic, saying to Moore, 'I'm terribly sorry, but I'm going to have to sneak off and have a pee!'."

(ABC Radio National, Australia)

Fig.1,2&3 Marshall Mcluhan, lecture recorded by ABC Radio National Network on 27 June 1977 in Australia.

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1977 • 2SM • ABC Radio National (Australia) • ABC Radio National Network • advertising industry • age of anxiety • age of electronic media • anxietyAustraliaAustralian Broadcasting CorporationBionic Woman • broadcasting conference • Bruce Gyngell • Canadiancommunicationcool mediumdebate • denim jeans • Derryn Hinchdigital eraelectronic mediaEuclidean geometryfolk artglobal villagehologram • hot medium • information anxietyinformation revolution • interconnectivity • InternetJane Austenlecture • live television • loss of privacy • Marshall McLuhanmass media age • McLuhan Project • media • media industry • media theory • media visionary • mediummedium is the messagemessage • Monday Conference (show) • networked societynostalgic yearning • nude streaking • privacyradio stationRichard Nixon • Robert Moore • studio audienceSydney • Sydney Hilton Hotel • television • The McLuhan Project • thinker • transcendental meditation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 SEPTEMBER 2011

The Norsk Folkemuseum living history museum in Norway

"The Norsk Folkemuseum is Norway's largest museum of cultural history. With collections from around the country, the museum shows how people lived in Norway from 1500 to the present.

The more than 150 buildings in the Open–Air Museum represent different regions in Norway, different time periods, as well as differences between town and country, and social classes. The Gol Stave Church dating from 1200 is one of five medieval buildings at the museum. The contemporary history is presented through exhibitions and documentation projects focusing especially on children, youth and the multicultural population. Permanent indoor exhibitions include folk art, folk costumes, toys and Sami culture."

(Astrid Santa, Norsk Folkemuseum)

[Actors are located in some of the buildings to provide visitors with a sense of the life of the original inhabitants.]

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1200 • 1500 • anthropologybuilding • contemporary history • costumecultural heritagecultural historyeverydayfolkfolk art • folk costumes • folk museum • Gol Stave Church • heritagehistorical reenactment • household • indoor exhibitions • living farm museum • living history museumliving museummedieval • medieval buildings • middle ages • multicultural population • museummuseum of cultural historyNordic • Norsk Folkemuseum • Norway • Norwegian Museum of Cultural History • open-air • open-air museumOslooutdoorperiod costumeperiod lifereenactment • Sami culture • ScandinaviasettlementSimon Perkins

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 OCTOBER 2009

Mainstreaming sustainable fashion

"4,5 Katharine Hamnett in a video interview explained how in the late 1980s she had been prompted to check, to make sure the company were not doing any harm. That meant looking at the entire supply chain to make sure that every phase was as good as possible. They had to apply very stringent standards from the very beginning. It started with the farmers given the millions involved in cotton agriculture who are exposed to pesticides, on a daily basis. It lead to focus on organic cotton but regrettably not using silk and considering all the packaging, dyes and printing inks. She has used certification, traceability and accountability, right the way through the supply chain but found taking complete control of this complex supply chain was the only way to enable this. She believed that the most effective to target were the CEO's, of clothing companies and fashion retailers. Mainstreaming sustainable fashion was happening because large retailers were realising that it was increasingly what consumers wanted: products that don't do damage to the environment, or that use child or sweated labour. Retailers ignored this at their peril. Sustainable clothing had to be sophisticated, glamorous and the bottom line was always economic. Sustainable clothing did not have to be more expensive. It could and should be affordable. She though that the ETI labour code should be compulsory and governments should act to have country of origin labelling for fibres."

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art for housewives • art of recyclingbelongingblogbricolagechangecommoditycommunityconsumptioncraft • crochet • Cynthia Korzekwa • design intelligencedesign responsibility • domestic arts • dyeecologyembroideryemotive manipulationengagementenvironmentenvironmentalethicsfashion • fiber arts • folk arthomemadejewelleryjunk art • Katharine Hamnett • knittingmaking art with recycled materialsobsolescenceorganicpaperpesticideproductionprotest • reconstructed fashion • recyclerecyclingremakereusesocial changesocietysustainabilitytextile artstransformation • trashion • urban crafts • waste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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