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Which clippings match 'Observation' keyword pg.1 of 3
05 AUGUST 2012

Hannah Starkey: reconstructed scenes from everyday life

"Using actors within carefully considered settings, Hannah Starkey's photographs reconstruct scenes from everyday life with the concentrated stylisation of film. Starkey's images picture women engaged in regular routines such as loitering in the street, sitting in cafes, or passively shopping. Starkey captures these generic 'in between' moments of daily life with a sense of relational detachment. Her still images operate as discomforting 'pauses'; where the banality of existence is freeze–framed in crisis point, creating reflective instances of inner contemplation, isolation, and conflicting emotion.

Through the staging of her scenes, Starkey's images evoke suggestive narratives through their appropriation of cultural templates: issues of class, race, gender, and identity are implied through the physical appearance of her models or places. Adopting the devices of filmography, Starkey's images are intensified with a pervasive voyeuristic intrusion, framing moments of intimacy for unapologetic consumption. Starkey often uses composition to heighten this sense of personal and emotional disconnection, with arrangements of lone figures separated from a group, or segregated with metaphoric physical divides such as tables or mirrors.

Often titling her work as Untitled, followed by a generalised date of creation, her photographs parallel the interconnected vagueness of memory, recalling suggestions of events and emotions without fixed location or context. Her work presents a platform where fiction and reality are blurred, illustrating the gap between personal fragility and social construction, and merging the experiences of strangers with our own."

(Saatchi Gallery)

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artificeawkwardnessbanalitycinematic conventionscultural appropriationcultural signals • cultural templates • daily lifedetachmentemotionlesseveryday life • fiction and reality • film stylisationframed momentsfreeze frame • Hannah Starkey • in-betweenin-between narratives • inner contemplation • intimacyintrospectionisolation • loitering • momentsnarrative photographynarrative scenesobservationpausephotographyplaceness • regular routines • routineSaatchi Galleryscene reconstructionsettingstagingstylisedsuggestive narrativesvignette • voyeuristic intrusion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2012

The Intimate Photograph: what does intimacy mean in visual terms?

"The goal of this class is to articulate and explore what intimacy means in visual terms. We will try and assemble a rhetorical rather than a purely emotional guide to the photograph's intimate claims. In the end, we may come to the conclusion that intimacy cannot be photographed directly (as we experience it) because, quite simply, the camera is always in the way. The trick, perhaps, is to understand intimacy as an imaginary space –– an illusion that exploits our very real longing for a profound and authentic encounter with another."

(Doug Dubois, 2010)

Fig.1 Doug Dubois (2003). "My Mother's Scar", Gloucester, Massachusetts.

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Berlin • digitalfotografie • dokumentarfotografie • Doug Dubois • facial nuanceforensic detail • foto • fotografie • fotokurs • fotokurse • intimacyintimate imageobservationphotographic portrait • photographic visual language • photographie • photographyportraitportraiturereal-lifeseeingsubtletyvisual languagewatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2011

Participant Observation as a Data Collection Method

"Participant observation, for many years, has been a hallmark of both anthropological and sociological studies. In recent years, the field of education has seen an increase in the number of qualitative studies that include participant observation as a way to collect information. Qualitative methods of data collection, such as interviewing, observation, and document analysis, have been included under the umbrella term of 'ethnographic methods' in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to discuss observation, particularly participant observation, as a tool for collecting data in qualitative research studies. Aspects of observation discussed herein include various definitions of participant observation, some history of its use, the purposes for which such observation is used, the stances or roles of the observer, and additional information about when, what, and how to observe."

(Barbara B. Kawulich)

Barbara B. Kawulich (2005). Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research. Volume 6, No. 2, Art. 43 – May 2005.

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academic journal • anthropological studies • anthropology • collecting data • data collectiondocument analysiseducation researchenquiryestablished research methodsethnographic methodsethnographyinterviewingobservationparticipant observationqualitative research methods • qualitative research studies • qualitative studies • research methods • role of the observer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2011

Design Council: Design methods

"This section explains some design methods and how they are used by designers. We talk you through everything from brainstorming to physical prototyping."

(UK Design Council)

[Their design 'methods' include: Observation, User diaries, Being your users, Brainstorming, Choosing a sample, Quantitative surveys, Fast visualisation, Secondary research, Focus groups, Assessment criteria, Comparing notes, Drivers and hurdles, Customer journey mapping, Character profiles, Scenarios, Role-playing, Service blueprints, Physical prototyping, Phasing, Final testing, Evaluation, Feedback loops, Methods banks.]

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eing your users • blueprinting • brainstorming • character profiles • choosing a sample • cluster and vote • comparing notes • customer journey mapping • Design Council (UK)design methoddesign methodologydesign methodsdesign researchdesign team • drivers and hurdles • fast visualisation • focus groups • hopes and fears • innovationmethods for design practicemind mapmind mappingobservationpersonas (UCD) • physical prototyping • project space • prototypingquantitative surveysrole playingscenarios • scribble-say-slap • scribble-say-slap brainstorming • secondary research • UCD • user diaries • workshop toolkit

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

Laban Movement Analysis: qualitative aspects of nonverbal behaviour

"Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) originated in the work of Rudolf Laban, and has evolved into a highly detailed practical system that describes qualitative aspects of nonverbal behavior. In its current development, it operates as a phenomenology of movement and mind, as it requires that the observer look at the movement itself, prior to interpretation and without prejudice, while acknowledging the intrinsic connection between movement and subjective experience. Movement Analysis increases kinesthetic sensitivity for the observer, because it places in the foreground of the observer's experience, those aspects of movement which are individual–specific: that is, those movement choices which an individual makes within a particular context. Movement Analysis as a system of observation assumes that a significant degree of individual freedom in movement quality is always present within biological, cultural, and contextually defined bodily repertoires."

(Janet Kaylo)

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attunementbodies in spacebodily engagement • bodily repertoires • body experiencechoreographycorporealdance performance • dance therapy • everyday movementexpressive repertoirefigures in spaceforensic detail • freedom of movement • intimacyintimateintimate movement • kinaesthetic sensitivity • kinesthetic • kinesthetic participation • kinetic exchange • Laban Movement Analysis • language for describing movement • LMA • movementmovement analysis • movement analysis methodology • movement and subjective experience • movement efficiency • movement experience • movement life • movement lives • movement performance • movement quality • movement vocabulary • nonverbal behaviourobservationpatterns of movement • phenomenology of mind • phenomenology of movement • physical presenceposturepuppetryreal-life • Rudolf Laban • seeing • seeing another • sensitivity to others • sensory abilitysubtlety • system of observation • theatre performance • therapeutic • understanding movementwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Elisza Ribeiro
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