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13 DECEMBER 2013

No Reverb Added: An Acoustical Experiment in Drumming

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acoustical experimentacousticsambient sound • audio editing • audio reflection • beatcut-updiegetic sounddrum beatdrum kit • drum pattern • drum solodrummingdrumsechoecho uniteditingenclosed spaceenvironment • Julien Audigier • live contextlocationlocation-specificmusic • Natal Drums • natural environmenton locationpersistence of soundplacere-edit • reverb • reverberation • reverberation time • sequence designsonic environmentsound • sound absorption • sound decaysound experimentssound performance • Vincent Rouffiac

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

Austin Kleon: Steal Like An Artist

"Austin Kleon's talk 'Steal Like An Artist' is a creative manifesto based on 10 things he wish he'd heard when he was starting out. Austin is a writer and artist. He's the author of Newspaper Blackout, a best–selling book of poetry made by redacting newspaper articles with a permanent marker. Austin's talk was delivered as part of the TEDxKC presentation of TEDxChange. Austin's work (including his new book) 'Steal Like An Artist' has been featured on NPR's Morning Edition, PBS Newshour, and in The Wall Street Journal. He speaks about creativity, visual thinking, and being an artist online for organizations such as SXSW and The Economist."

(TEDx Talk, 2012, Kansas City)

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2012 • Austin Kleon • authorshipBrion Gysin • Caleb Whitefoord • citation as a form of persuasionclipping • creative lineage • creative manifesto • creativitycreditingcultural productioncut-up techniqueDavid Bowieeditingephemeralerasure • genealogy of ideas • history of ideasIgor Stravinsky • marker pen • mash-up • newspaper blackout • newspaper clipping • nothing is originalNPRobliteratePablo PicassoPBS • permanent marker • redactedredactionremix culturesteal from anywhere • SXSW • TED Talks • TEDxChange • TEDxKC • The Economist • Tom Phillips • Tristan Tzaravisual thinkingWall Street Journal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 DECEMBER 2012

Influential American experimental cinema: Meshes of the Afternoon

"Meshes of the Afternoon is one of the most influential works in American experimental cinema. A non–narrative work, it has been identified as a key example of the 'trance film,' in which a protagonist appears in a dreamlike state, and where the camera conveys his or her subjective focus. The central figure in Meshes of the Afternoon, played by Deren, is attuned to her unconscious mind and caught in a web of dream events that spill over into reality. Symbolic objects, such as a key and a knife, recur throughout the film; events are open–ended and interrupted. Deren explained that she wanted 'to put on film the feeling which a human being experiences about an incident, rather than to record the incident accurately.'

Made by Deren with her husband, cinematographer Alexander Hammid, Meshes of the Afternoon established the independent avant–garde movement in film in the United States, which is known as the New American Cinema. It directly inspired early works by Kenneth Anger, Stan Brakhage, and other major experimental filmmakers. Beautifully shot by Hammid, a leading documentary filmmaker and cameraman in Europe (where he used the surname Hackenschmied) before he moved to New York, the film makes new and startling use of such standard cinematic devices as montage editing and matte shots. Through her extensive writings, lectures, and films, Deren became the preeminent voice of avant–garde cinema in the 1940s and the early 1950s."

(MoMA, 2004)

The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, revised 2004, originally published 1999.

Maya Deren (1943). "Meshes of the Afternoon", 16mm film, black and white, silent, 14 min. Acquired from the Artist.

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16mm1943 • Alexander Hackenschmied • Alexander Hammid • American cinemaavant-garde cinemablack and whiteBolexcinemacinematic devicescloakdeathdream • dream world • dreamlike qualityeditingexperimental cinemaexperimental film • experimental filmmaker • filmfilm pioneerfilmmakerflowerFreudianindependent cinemainfluential directorinfluential worksKenneth Angerkeyknife • matte • Maya Deren • Meshes of the Afternoon • mirrorMoMA • New American Cinema • non-narrativeopen-endedpersonal filmrecurring ideasrepetitionrhythmscreen-mediated virtual spaceseminalsilent filmstaircaseStan Brakhagesurrealist cinemasymbolic meaningsymbolism • Teiji Ito • tranceunconscious desires • unconscious meaning • women in filmwomen in historywordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2012

Outtakes from a 16mm colour film

Outtake from a 16mm documentary called "Horseplay" that was created by Simon Perkins in 1990. The film was shot on location in Waimate in the South Island of Aotearoa New Zealand at Philip and Lee Trusttum's farm. The footage was photographed by Peter Bannan on a CP16 with sound being recorded by Robert Sarkies on a Nagra. The outtakes show Lee, Philip and Robert as well as Vivienne Stone and Peter Leech. Note that the poor image quality is due to the crude transfer process which involved pointing a VHS video camera at rushes being played on a Steenbeck film editing bench.

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16mm1990analogue errorsartefactingartefactsauthentic residueclapperboard • CP16 • deleted • deleted scene • design processdetritus • edit out • editing • editing process • farmfilm • film burn • film scratches • final cut • flares • flash frame • flash frames • flashframes • glitcheshorseHorseplayLee TrusttummaterialityNagraomission • outtake • overexposed frames • paintingPeter BannanPeter EvansPeter LeechPhilip Trusttum • removed • Robert SarkiesSouth Island • Steenbeck • takes • telecineunintentionally • unused • Vivienne Stone • Waimate

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

Plural Eyes: sync software for dual-system and multi-camera audio

"PluralEyes is a product that can save you a lot of time, especially if you have good clear audio recorded with each camera. If there is too much redundancy in the audio tracks (concert) or a lot of echo in some of the tracks (Church) you may find that PluralEyes will only be able to match a part of the sequence, leaving clips on the timeline that need to be manually synced. When this happens you can try locking the clips that were successfully synced, then exporting the sequence once again in hopes that PluralEyes will find a match for the unlocked clips, but I personally haven't had too much luck with that process.

The biggest issue I have with any type of automated software is that if it's not 100% accurate, you learn not to fully trust it and rightfully so. When you have multiple tracks to sync and potentially hundreds of clips, it becomes a daunting task to have to go through the entire edit – once for each track you were trying to sync, just to make sure that all the clips are in their proper position. It may be just as quick (or as time consuming) to sync up your clips manually as it is to use automated software that might have to be re–run a few times before finally coming close – only to force you to manually go through your piece clip by clip and track–by–track to check its accuracy.

PluralEyes can save you tons of editing time, but it's really important to have good clear audio with each track you want to sync. On the first few projects that I used PluralEyes for CS5 with I was pretty disappointed with the results. I even delayed this review until I had more experience with the software. Now that I have learned not to expect 100% accuracy I have stopped 're–syncing' and 're–syncing' in hopes of achieving it. I let PluralEyes do most of the grunt work, then I go through and just manually sync up the small percentage of clips it missed. It's pretty easy to do since most of my footage is shot in chronological order so I know that clip C will need to go somewhere between clips B and D.

Part of my high expectations with this software was due to the many demo videos I have seen, not just from PluralEyes, but also from other reviewers. Their videos often show PluralEyes successfully syncing up just a few clips, so when I started to test the software with more involved edits it was aggravating to discover a percentage of clips that weren't synced. I wasted a lot of time trying to figure out why and trying to re–sync these projects, which in–turn wasted more time. Once I got over my high expectations I become much more productive. PluralEyes can truly save you hours of editing time, especially once you learn that itis sometimes quicker to manually sync the small percentage of clips that the software misses than it is to fiddle around with re–syncing using different settings."

(Ron Risman, March 2010, Cameratown.com)

Fig.1 Justin Davey http://www.mountstudios.co.uk/

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Adobe Premiere Pro • audioautomationclapboardclapperclapperboardconvergenceCS4 • CS5 • digital filmmakingDSLR • dual-system audio • DualEyes • editingFinal Cut Pro • Justin Davey • marker • Media Composer • multi-camera • multi-take • multicamera • music video • PluralEyes • post productionproductivityrecording • Singular Software • slateslate boardsoftwaresound recordingsyncsync slatesynchronisationtime slatetimecode • Vegas Pro • videovideo editingvideo post-productionworkflowworkflow tool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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