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Which clippings match '21st Century' keyword pg.1 of 5
22 SEPTEMBER 2014

Future Knowledge: Lev Manovich Interview

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TAGS

21st centuryAdobe IllustratorAdobe PhotoshopAfter Effects • always-changing field • contemporary designcontemporary media • contemporary media software • cultural artefactsdigital cultureearly 20th centuryearly 21st centuryelectronic technologiesFinal Cut ProGoogle Earthinteractive environments • interface to the world • interfaces • Lev ManovichMaya • mechanical technologies • media • media applications • media authoring • media machinemedia sharing • media-specific tools • medias access • memory • our imagination • physical technologies • software • software for media authoring • Software Takes Command • The Language of New Mediathe medium • theory of the technology • tools shape • universal engine • universal language • visual aestheticsweb services

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
17 JANUARY 2014

Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture

"Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture (WPCC) is a peer–reviewed journal, published four times a year in hard copy and online.

WPCC recognises the interdisciplinary nature of the field of Media and Cultural Studies, and therefore deliberately encourages diverse methods, contexts and themes.

Particular interests include, but are not limited to, work related to Popular Culture, Media Audiences, Political Economy, Promotional Culture, New Media, Political communication, Migration and Diasporic Studies.

A major goal of the WPCC is to help develop a de–westernised and transcultural sphere that engages both young and established scholars from different parts of the world in a critical debate about the relationship between communication, culture and society in the 21st Century."

(Anthony McNicholas)

TAGS

21st century • Andrea Medrado • Anthony McNicholas • Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) • critical debate • critical discoursecultural studiesculture and society • de-westernised • diaspora • diasporic studies • ethnographic researchinterdisciplinary thinking • media and cultural studies • media audiences • media communication • media studies • migration studies • new mediapeer-reviewed journal • political communication • political economypopular culture • promotional culture • transculturalUniversity of Westminster • Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture (WPCC) • WPCC

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Handmade in Britain: The Story of Wallpaper

"In the second programme in the series, presenter Paul Martin reveals the secret history of wallpaper from the 17th century to the present day.

The film explores how wallpaper, seemingly so fragile and easy to replace, provides a vital index of changing tastes in the home. The programme shows how from its earliest days wallpaper imitated other, more costly wall coverings: from the 17th–century papers that were designed to look like embroidered textiles to 18th–century flocked wallpapers. The latter, intended as a cheaper substitute for costly damasks or velvets, became a triumph of British innovation, coming to grace the grandest of state apartments and country house interiors.

Focussing on how wallpaper was actually made, the programme goes onto explore how it became one of the battlefields in discussions about design in the 19th century. For, although technological innovations in machine printing had allowed manufacturers to print elaborate designs with complex colour–ways, some commentators were shocked by the poor aesthetic quality of British wallpapers. The programme looks at how designers and reformers attempted to take the situation in hand: from 'The False Principles of Design', an exhibition organised by Sir Henry Cole, the first Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which sought to instruct the British public in good and bad design; to the pioneering work of Augustus Pugin and William Morris.

Finally, the film traces the fortunes of wallpaper in the 20th century. Patterned walls faced stiff competition from the purity of plain, painted or whitewashed walls, as advocated by modernists like Le Corbusier. However, new techniques, like screen–printing, allowed shorter runs of innovate wallpapers, which were aimed at architects and interior designers. And, as Paul Martin discovers, wallpaper is still flourishing at the beginning of the 21st century. A combination of digital printing, screen–printing and hand–printing allows companies, like Timorous Beasties, to produce exciting new designs.

Presented by Paul Martin, contributors include Christine Woods, Anthony Wells–Cole, Martha Armitage, Allyson McDermott and Paul Simmons (Timorous Beasties), as well as V&A experts."

First broadcast on 25 September 2013 on BBC Four as part of the Handmade in Britain series [http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03bm1rg].

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TAGS

16th century17th century18th century19th century20th century21st century • Allyson McDermott • Anthony Wells-Cole • antiqueart and craftsArts and Crafts Movement • Augustus Pugin • bad design • BBC Four • changing tastes • Christine Woods • colourways • damask • deluxe item • design craftdigital printingdomestic material object • elaborate designs • embroidered textiles • flock wallpaper • good design • hand-printing • Handmade in Britain (series) • Henry Cole • industrial grime • interior design • interior designer • interior stylingLe Corbusierluxury • machine printing • makersmanufacturing technology • Marthe Armitage • Palladio Wallpapers • pattern • Paul Martin • Paul Simmons • poisonprinting processscreenprinting • stately homes • technological innovation • The False Principles of Design • Timorous Beasties • two-up-two-down • velvetVictoria and Albert Museum • wall coverings • wallpaperwallpaper design • wallpapering • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Mass Observation Archive: a UK social history writing project

"The Mass Observation Project (MOP) is a unique UK–based writing project which has been running since 1981. ... [it] differs from other similar social investigations because of its historical link to the original Mass Observation and because of its focus is on voluntary, self–motivated participation. It revives the early Mass Observation notion that everyone can participate in creating their own history or social science. The Mass Observers do not constitute a statistically representative sample of the population but can be seen as reporters or 'citizen journalists' who provide a window on their worlds.

The material is solicited in response to 'directives' or open–ended questions sent to them by post or email three times a year. The directives contain two or three broad themes which cover both very personal issues and wider political and social issues and events.

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1937198120th century21st century • Charles Madge • citizen journalismconfessioncultural heritagediagramdiary • directives • drawingseventseveryday lifehistorical archiveshistorical chronicles • Humphrey Jennings • letterslistlongitudinal studymapMass Observation Project (MOP)material culture • memoir • open-ended questionsopinion • ordinary people • personal experiencephotographsplacespolitical issuesposterity • press cutting • qualitative researchresearch resourcesself knowledge • self-identity • self-revelationsocial historysocial issuessocial researchstatistically representative samplestoriessubjectivitytheir storiesthematic patterns • Tom Harrisson • UK • University of Sussex • voluntary participationwriting project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JANUARY 2013

What's the Value of Culture Today?

"Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the meaning and value of culture in the twenty–first century. In a programme recorded in front of an audience at Newcastle's Literary and Philosophical Society, Melvyn and the panel consider whether Matthew Arnold's assessment of culture as 'the great help out of our present difficulties' still has any relevance, almost 150 years after it was written."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2013)

"The Value of Culture: Two Cultures", Radio broadcast, Episode 5 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Friday 04 January 2013, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

Photo credit: J. Russell, Strobel Lab, Yale University 2009

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21st century • assessment of culture • chimpanzeeChristopher Fraylingcommunity regenerationcreative industriescultural formscultural hegemony • culture today • culture war • Department of Science and Art • everyday practice • everything that is not nature • expertise • great help out of our present difficulties • high culturehuman activities • Literary and Philosophical Society • Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle upon Tyne • Matt Ridley • Matthew Arnold • meaning of culture • Melvyn Bragg • New Caledonian Crow • Newcastle • not nature • novelspanel discussionspopular culture • recorded in front of an audience • The Value of Culture (radio)Thomas Kuhn • Tiffany Jenkins • value of culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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