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Which clippings match 'H.264' keyword pg.1 of 1
27 MAY 2013

HandBrake: open-source video transcoder

"HandBrake is an open–source, GPL–licensed, multiplatform, multithreaded video transcoder, available for MacOS X, Linux and Windows. Convert from many common multimedia file formats, including unprotected DVD or BluRay sources to a handful of modern output file formats."

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TAGS

2003 • batch encoding • batch processing • blu-ray • CODECcompression • decombing • deinterlacing • detelecine • DVDencoderencoding • encoding engine • Eric Petit • file conversion processfile formatGPLH.264 • HandBrake (software) • media formatmedia technology • MediaFork • multiplatform • multithreading • open sourceopen source software • scaling • softwareSourceForgesubtitletechnology • titer • tool • transcode • transcodingvideo encodingvideo mediavideo processingvideo software • video transcoder

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2013

Magic Lantern: modified firmware for Canon DSLR cameras

"Magic Lantern is a software enhancement that offers increased functionality to the excellent Canon DSLR cameras. We have created an open framework, licensed under GPL, for developing extensions to the official firmware.

Magic Lantern is not a 'hack', or a modified firmware, it is an independent program that runs alongside Canon's own software. Each time you start your camera, Magic Lantern is loaded from your memory card. Our only modification was to enable the ability to run software from the memory card.

ML is being developed by photo and video enthusiasts, adding functionality such as: HDR images and video, timelapse, motion detection, focus assist tools, manual audio controls much more."

(Magic Lantern)

Fig.1 Canon 5D Mark II HDR Video from Neumann Films testing Magic Lantern's HDR video function.

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TAGS

CanonCanon 5D • Canon 5Dmk2 • Canon 5Dmk3 • Canon 5DmkII • Canon 5DmkIII • Canon 7DCanon DSLRdigital cinematographydigital filmmakingDNG • DNG raw video • DSLR • DSLR camera • enthusiasts • firmware • functionalityGNU General Public License • GNU GPL • GPLH.264high definition videohigh resolution • increased functionality • Magic Lantern (software) • memory card • modified firmware • open frameworkopen platform • RAW video • software application • software enhancement • software extensions • software hack

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2011

Encode HD video for Vimeo or YouTube using Adobe Media Encoder

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TAGS

1080i • 1280×720 • 1280x720p • 1440x1080i • 16:9 • 1920x1080i • 25 fps • 29.97 fps • 30 fps • 480 lines • 480i • 50 frames per second • 50 Hz • 576 lines • 576i • 60 Hz • 720 • 720 horizontal scan lines • 720 interlaced lines • 720 pixels of vertical resolution • 720p • 720p HDTV • Adobe Media Encoder • Adobe Media Encoder CS4 • Adobe PremiereAfter Effects • ATSC • AVC • bitrate • bitrate encoding • broadcast standard • CODECcompressionCS4 • display resolution • DVB • encoderencoding • field order • formatFPS • frame rate • frames per second • Full HD • H.264HDHDTVhigh definition videohigh-definition • interlaced • interlaced video • Media Encoder CS4 • media technology • non-interlaced • NTSC • Pal • pixel aspect ratio • progressive scan • progressive scanning • square pixels • standard definition • target bitrate • tutorialvideovideo encoding • video frame • video resolution • VimeoYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2010

Most video on the web is published using the H.264 format

"Adobe has repeatedly said that Apple mobile devices cannot access 'the full web' because 75% of video on the web is in Flash. What they don't say is that almost all this video is also available in a more modern format, H.264, and viewable on iPhones, iPods and iPads. YouTube, with an estimated 40% of the web's video, shines in an app bundled on all Apple mobile devices, with the iPad offering perhaps the best YouTube discovery and viewing experience ever. Add to this video from Vimeo, Netflix, Facebook, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, ESPN, NPR, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, People, National Geographic, and many, many others."

(Steve Jobs, April 2010)

Fig.1 video of iPhone mugging attempt on Steven Levy's phone.

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TAGS

2010ABCAdobe FlashAdobe SystemsAppleCBSCNNCODECcontentconvergence • ESPN • FacebookFox NewsH.264HTML5 • iPads • iPhoneiPodmobile device • MSNBC • National Geographic Magazine • NetflixNew York TimesNPRPeople magazinepublishing • Sports Illustrated • Steve JobsTime Magazinevideovideo on the webVimeoWall Street JournalYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 SEPTEMBER 2009

How Firefox Is Pushing Open Video Onto the Web

"HTML 5, the emerging standard, is that content creators will be able to embed video and audio files on web pages with the same simplicity and ease as images and links.

The tools being used to power this behavior are the Ogg Theora and Vorbis codecs maintained by the non–profit Xiph.org. Currently, most video and audio on the web is presented using either Adobe's Flash Player, Microsoft's Silverlight or Apple's QuickTime. These are proprietary technologies, which means they come with various restrictions – licenses, patents and fees – attached.

Ogg, being open–source and patent–free, has no fees and very few use restrictions. Ogg has been around for a while. It was beaten out by MP3 in the Napster days as the audio format of choice, and has remained obscure ever since. It's also gotten a bad reputation because of poor quality and large file sizes compared to competing tools like h.264, which is used by both Quicktime and Flash, and will be used in the next release of Silverlight.

However, in the past year, the quality issues dogging Ogg have been largely solved thanks to the increased interest and involvement of developers who want to see support for open video on the web become a reality.

At a recent developer conference, Google showed off how it was building Ogg support directly into its Chrome browser to handle video playback without using any plug–ins. Mozilla's Jay Sullivan was then invited on stage, where he announced the next version of Firefox would also include built–in Ogg support, all part of a grand plan among browser makers to, in Sullivan's words, free video from 'plug–in prison.'"
(Michael Calore. Webmonkey, 18 June 2009)

TAGS

Adobe SystemsAppleChromeCODECconvergenceFirefox • Flash Player • Google IncH.264HTMLHTML5innovationinterdisciplinary • Jay Sullivan • MicrosoftMozillamp3Oggopen codecsopen sourceopen video • patent-free • QuickTimeSilverlightsolutiontechnologyTheoraVorbis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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