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01 AUGUST 2012

Film4 Scene Stealers: Sexy Biscuit

FIlm4 are running a competition whereby users recreate a favourite scene from a Film4–funded movie. I chose to recreate the opening of "Sexy Beast" in low–fi animation.

Fig.1 Francis Glenday "Sexy Biscuit", Country: New Zealand, Submitted: 31/07/2012, Recreating: Jonathan Glazer (2000) "Sexy Beast".

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TAGS

animationAotearoa New Zealand • best new talent • biscuitfilm competition • Film4 channel • filmmakerfilmmaking • Francis Glenday • gingerbread man • independent filmmaking • Jonathan Glazer • kiwi short filmskiwi shortslow-budget filmlow-fi • micro budget • nz short film • original screenplay • ovenpaying homage • recreate a favourite scene • remake • Sexy Beast • short film • short film making • short film projects • short films • stealing a scene • under the gri

CONTRIBUTOR

Francis Glenday
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Jim Jarmusch: authenticity is invaluable; originality is non-existent!

"Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is non–existent. And don't bother concealing your thievery – celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean–Luc Godard said: 'It's not where you take things from – it's where you take them to."

(Jim Jarmusch)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2005

Citation as a form of persuasion

"Weinstock (1971) lists 15 discrete 'reasons for using citations', including 'paying homage to pioneers; giving credit for related work; identifying methodology, equipment, etc; ... criticising previous work, substantiating claims; ... disclaiming work or ideas of others; disputing priority claims of others'. More parsimoniously, Chubin and Moitra (1975) categorise references as, broadly, affirmative and negational. They subdivide the affirmative group into basic and subsidiary, additional and perfunctory, and the negational group into partial and total. Within physics, which they take as the basis for their analysis, they find very few partially negational references and no totally negational ones – a point to be taken up in the subsequent discussion of academic controversy. Gilbert (1977b) argues that the main function of referencing is to act as a covert form of persuasion; and, in staunch ethnomethodological tradition, Small (1978) contends that cited documents serve as 'concept symbols' – 'in citing a document the author is creating its meaning': besides 'its functional, social and political implications', citation may be used 'to curry favour, to publicise, to favour one approach over another', and so on."
(Tony Becher, p.87)

Becher, Tony. 1989 "Academic Tribes and Territories: Intellectual Enquiry and the Cultures of Disciplines", Milton Keynes, UK: Open University Press.

Chubin, D. E. and Moitra, S. (1975) Content analysis of references. Social Studies of Science, 5, pp. 423–41
Gilbert, G. (1977b) Referencing as persuasion. Social Studies of Science, 7, pp. 113–22
Small, H. (1978) Cited documents as concept symbols. Social Studies of Science, 8, pp. 327–40.

Fig.1 CDRyan, 2008. COMMANDS. Series of 3 Digital Prints, 5 x 7 inches Atmostheory

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TAGS

Chubin • citationcitation as a form of persuasionciteconcept symbolsconceptualisationcreditingenquiry • G. Nigel Gilbert • Harvard Referencing System • Henry Small • insight • Michael Weinstock • Moitra • paying homagepersuasionprecedencereferenceresearchstanding on the shoulders of giantstheory building • Tony Becher
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