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04 MAY 2013

Austin Kleon: Steal Like An Artist

"Austin Kleon's talk 'Steal Like An Artist' is a creative manifesto based on 10 things he wish he'd heard when he was starting out. Austin is a writer and artist. He's the author of Newspaper Blackout, a best–selling book of poetry made by redacting newspaper articles with a permanent marker. Austin's talk was delivered as part of the TEDxKC presentation of TEDxChange. Austin's work (including his new book) 'Steal Like An Artist' has been featured on NPR's Morning Edition, PBS Newshour, and in The Wall Street Journal. He speaks about creativity, visual thinking, and being an artist online for organizations such as SXSW and The Economist."

(TEDx Talk, 2012, Kansas City)

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TAGS

2012 • Austin Kleon • authorshipBrion Gysin • Caleb Whitefoord • citation as a form of persuasionclipping • creative lineage • creative manifesto • creativitycreditingcultural productioncut-up techniqueDavid Bowieeditingephemeralerasure • genealogy of ideas • history of ideasIgor Stravinsky • marker pen • mash-up • newspaper blackout • newspaper clipping • nothing is originalNPRobliteratePablo PicassoPBS • permanent marker • redactedredactionremix culturesteal from anywhere • SXSW • TED Talks • TEDxChange • TEDxKC • The Economist • Tom Phillips • Tristan Tzaravisual thinkingWall Street Journal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JULY 2012

Spot the Difference project on visual plagiarism

"Whilst there has been extensive research and guidance on the nature and issues surrounding text–based plagiarism in Further and Higher Education, there has been relatively little research undertaken on the topic of plagiarism in non–text based media. The Spot the Difference project seeks to address this gap and to undertake research on the meaning, nature, and issues surrounding the complex and nebulous concept of 'visual plagiarism', as well as to investigate the potential uses and relevance that visual search technology may have to offer in this area."

(Leigh Garrett, VADS, University for the Creative Arts)

The project is a collaboration between the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS) at the University for the Creative Arts and the Centre for Vision, Speech, and Signal Processing (CVSSP) at the University of Surrey. The project is funded through a JISC Learning & Teaching Innovation grant from June 2011 to May 2012.

Fig.1 'Giving credit' poster by Pia Jane Bijkerk [http://www.piajanebijkerk.com/], Erin Loechner, and Yvette van Boven.

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TAGS

Amy Robinson • appropriationauthorship • Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing • citation as a form of persuasioncreditingcultural production • CVSSP • Erin Loechner • further education • giving credit • Harvard Referencing SystemHEhigher educationimage identificationJISC • John Collomosse • Leigh Garrett • nothing is originaloriginalityownership • Pia Jane Bijkerk • plagiarism • plagiarism in non-text based media • poster • Spot the Difference (project) • text-based plagiarism • theftthieverytransformative worksUniversity for the Creative Arts • University of Surrey • VADS • Visual Arts Data Service • visual plagiarism • visual search technology • your work • Yvette van Boven

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Jim Jarmusch: authenticity is invaluable; originality is non-existent!

"Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is non–existent. And don't bother concealing your thievery – celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean–Luc Godard said: 'It's not where you take things from – it's where you take them to."

(Jim Jarmusch)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2005

Citation as a form of persuasion

"Weinstock (1971) lists 15 discrete 'reasons for using citations', including 'paying homage to pioneers; giving credit for related work; identifying methodology, equipment, etc; ... criticising previous work, substantiating claims; ... disclaiming work or ideas of others; disputing priority claims of others'. More parsimoniously, Chubin and Moitra (1975) categorise references as, broadly, affirmative and negational. They subdivide the affirmative group into basic and subsidiary, additional and perfunctory, and the negational group into partial and total. Within physics, which they take as the basis for their analysis, they find very few partially negational references and no totally negational ones – a point to be taken up in the subsequent discussion of academic controversy. Gilbert (1977b) argues that the main function of referencing is to act as a covert form of persuasion; and, in staunch ethnomethodological tradition, Small (1978) contends that cited documents serve as 'concept symbols' – 'in citing a document the author is creating its meaning': besides 'its functional, social and political implications', citation may be used 'to curry favour, to publicise, to favour one approach over another', and so on."
(Tony Becher, p.87)

Becher, Tony. 1989 "Academic Tribes and Territories: Intellectual Enquiry and the Cultures of Disciplines", Milton Keynes, UK: Open University Press.

Chubin, D. E. and Moitra, S. (1975) Content analysis of references. Social Studies of Science, 5, pp. 423–41
Gilbert, G. (1977b) Referencing as persuasion. Social Studies of Science, 7, pp. 113–22
Small, H. (1978) Cited documents as concept symbols. Social Studies of Science, 8, pp. 327–40.

Fig.1 CDRyan, 2008. COMMANDS. Series of 3 Digital Prints, 5 x 7 inches Atmostheory

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TAGS

Chubin • citationcitation as a form of persuasionciteconcept symbolsconceptualisationcreditingenquiry • G. Nigel Gilbert • Harvard Referencing System • Henry Small • insight • Michael Weinstock • Moitra • paying homagepersuasionprecedencereferenceresearchstanding on the shoulders of giantstheory building • Tony Becher
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