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Which clippings match 'EPSRC' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 MAY 2012

2010 IMPACT!: the 5th Dimensional Camera

"'With their evocative multidimensional camera, the designers have attempted to embody Hugh Everett's many–worlds theory in an object that adds to the cinematic tradition of The Matrix (1999), Lost (2004–10), Fringe (2008–ongoing), and Source Code (2011), to name just a few.

With researchers working to harness the the peculiar workings of our subatomic world, we, as designers, were given an opportunity to explore the implications of one of its more concrete and immediate applications: quantum computing.

Working with EPSRC, NESTA, the RCA, and a group of scientists from the Quantum Information Processing Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (QIPIRC), the 5th Dimensional Camera was produced for the 2010 IMPACT! exhibition as a metaphorical representation of quantum computation – a fictional device capable of capturing glimpses of parallel universes."

(Superflux Ltd.)

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TAGS

2010 • 2010 IMPACT! • 5th dimension • 5th Dimensional Camera • blending physics • cameradesignersEPSRC • exploring implications • fictional devices • Fringe (television) • futures studies • futurologyHugh EverettIndia • Lost (television) • Many Worlds Interpretation • Many Worlds theory • metaphormetaphorical representationmultiple dimensionsNESTAparallel universe • parallel universes • product design • QIPIRC • quantum computation • quantum computing • Quantum Information Processing Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration • quantum mechanicsRCAresearchersscientistsSource Code (2011)speculative designspeculative researchspeculative science • subatomic world • Superflux (consultancy) • tangible prototypeThe Matrix (1999)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2012

Equator: interdisciplinary research centring on the integration of physical and digital interaction

"The IRC brought together researchers from eight different institutions and a variety of disciplines which address the technical, social and design issues in the development of new inter–relationships between the physical and digital.

A series of experience projects engaged with different user communities to develop new combinations of physical and digital worlds and explore how these may be exploited and how these may enhance the quality of everyday life.

A series of research challenges explored (a) new classes of device which link the physical and the digital, (b) adaptive software architectures and (c) new design and evaluation methods, which draw together approaches from social science, cognitive science and art and design. Equator involved over 60 researchers, with a range of expertise encompassing computer science, psychology, sociology, design and the arts.

Equator aimed to forge a clearer understanding of what it means to live in an age when digital and physical activities not only coexist but cooperate. This is the age we are now entering, and it promises radical change in how we communicate, interact, work and play–that is, how we live. But to fulfil that promise requires more than new technology. We need equally new ways of thinking about technology, and thus also about ourselves.

Everyone recognises that the computer is moving beyond the workplace. As digital systems (like the Web) converge with computer networks and cellular phone communications, new devices and services proliferate–many of them mobile, or embedded in the environment. Yet few people fully grasp the potential impact of such technological fluidity and ubiquity. Most current research is still rooted in the workaday world of the desk–bound PC. But look at the possibilities–for our home life, our schooling, community care, even our city streets.

These are just some of the areas which Equator explored, through the development of coherent new systems and devices. Ultimately, however, we were less concerned with solutions to specific design problems than with the bigger picture these solutions entail. This is what united so diverse a community of researchers. For it is only by sketching the bigger picture that we can begin to fulfil the promise offered by our new age, and so improve the quality of everyday life in years to come."

(Equator)

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TAGS

adaptive software architectures • art and design • city streets • coexist but cooperate • cognitive sciencecommunicatecomputer networkscomputer science • design and evaluation methods • design issues • devices • digital and physical activities • digital systems • EPSRC • Equator (research) • everyday life • experience projects • HCI • inter-relationships • interact • interactioninterdisciplinary • interdisciplinary research collaboration • IRC • new devices • new servicesphysical and digitalphysical and digital interaction • physical and digital worlds • psychology • quality of everyday life • radical change • research challenges • researcherssocial issuessocial sciencesociology • technical issues • technology proliferationubiquity • user communities • work and play

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2010

Technology Enhanced Learning: ubiquitous access to knowledge

"Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) research aims to improve the quality of formal and informal learning, and to make accessible forms of knowledge that were simply inaccessible before. But research does not translate easily into practice, at school, in higher education or in the workplace. The forms of pedagogy that characterise learning in these settings have remained more or less invariant even when radical technologies have been introduced."

(Technology Enhanced Learning)

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TAGS

2.0 • 20072012collaborativecompetitivecomputer assisted learningcurricula designcurriculum designdigital culture • digital inclusion • digital literacies • education studies • educational researchEPSRC • equality and access • ESRCflexibilityhigher educationinclusion • institutional policy • internet-based interaction • knowledgeknowledge acquisitionlearning and teachinglearning designliteraciesliteracyLondon Knowledge LabMoodlemulti-useronline lecturespedagogypersonalisationproductivity • radical technologies • Richard Noss • Second Life (SL)semantic web • Sloodle • social learningsocial softwaresocialisationtechnologyTechnology Enhanced Learning • Technology Enhanced Learning TEL • ubiquitous accessUKvirtual worldsWeb 2.0workplace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 AUGUST 2009

EPSRC & AHRC Funding for e-Science Demonstrator Project

"In September 2006 the BVREH was awarded funding by EPSRC/AHRC to build a demonstration 'Virtual Workspace for the Study of Ancient Documents'. The three month project answered a call for 'e–Science demonstrator projects in the arts and humanities' and finished in December 2006. The project constructed a virtual workspace for research involving decipherment and textual analysis of damaged and degraded ancient documents. It forms a step to providing direct access to widely scattered research resources such as dictionaries, corpora of texts and images of original documents and enables the researcher to store, annotate and organize items in a 'personal workspace'. The workspace also supports collaboration by allowing multiple researchers in separate locations to share a common view, working as if sat together, studying the original document."
(Ruth Kirkham, University of Oxford eResearch Centre, 2006–05–09)

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2006AHRCancient documentsannotation • Building a Virtual Research Environment for the Humanities • BVREH • conceptualisation • corpora of texts and images • data • demonstrator project • diagram • dictionaries • digital technologydiscoveryenquiryEPSRCeresearchescienceexperimentationICTinformation in contextinsightintegratemanuscriptnotationobject • original documents • Oxford eResearch Centre • personal workspaceresearchsolutiontechnologytextual analysistheory buildingUniversity of Oxford • virtual workspace • Virtual Workspace for the Study of Ancient Documents • visual depictionvisualisationVRE • VRE-SDM • VWSAD

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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