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Which clippings match 'Data Collection' keyword pg.1 of 3
05 DECEMBER 2016

Towards data justice? The ambiguity of anti-surveillance resistance in political activism

"The Snowden leaks, first published in June 2013, provided unprecedented insights into the operations of state-corporate surveillance, highlighting the extent to which everyday communication is integrated into an extensive regime of control that relies on the 'datafication' of social life. Whilst such data-driven forms of governance have significant implications for citizenship and society, resistance to surveillance in the wake of the Snowden leaks has predominantly centred on techno-legal responses relating to the development and use of encryption and policy advocacy around privacy and data protection. Based on in-depth interviews with a range of social justice activists, we argue that there is a significant level of ambiguity around this kind of anti-surveillance resistance in relation to broader activist practices, and critical responses to the Snowden leaks have been confined within particular expert communities. Introducing the notion of 'data justice', we therefore go on to make the case that resistance to surveillance needs to be (re)conceptualized on terms that can address the implications of this data-driven form of governance in relation to broader social justice agendas. Such an approach is needed, we suggest, in light of a shift to surveillance capitalism in which the collection, use and analysis of our data increasingly comes to shape the opportunities and possibilities available to us and the kind of society we live in."

(Lina Dencik, Arne Hintz and Jonathan Cable, 2016)

TAGS

2016 • activist practices • anti-surveillance resistance • Arne Hintz • big data • collection and processing of data • critical responses • Danielle Citron • data collection • data collection and retention • data encryption • data justice • data processes • data protectiondata security • data tracking • data-driven form of governance • data-driven forms of governance • datafication • datafication of social life • David Lyon • Edward Snowden • everyday communication • Frank Pasquale • individual rights • John Sylvia IV • Jonathan Cable • Lina Dencik • Miriyam Aouragh • Natasha Dow • personal data • policy advocacy • political activism • politics of data-driven processes • privacy • privacy and the protection of personal data • profiling • protection of personal data • regime of control • resistance to surveillance • retention of informationsocial justice • social justice activists • social justice agendas • social life • societal implications of data collection • state-corporate surveillance • surveillance • techno-legal responses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 NOVEMBER 2013

FlyKly: Kickstarter proposal for a Smart Wheel with app integration

"Smart Wheel is a pedal assist which means it helps you ride your bike effortlessly. The motor turns on when you start pedaling and begins accelerating to your desired speed. It stops when you stop. It saves you time by getting you to your destination faster and gets you there without losing your breath or breaking a sweat. ...

FlyKly App allows you to control and monitor the Smart Wheel. It also offers many other features like safety, support and social connectivity. It's available for free for iOS and Android devices with Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity and for the Pebble Watch."

(Niko Klansek, FlyKly)

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TAGS

all-in-oneAndroid OS • app integration • bicyclebicycle wheelsbluetoothconnectivity • cycling habits • Darko Osterversnik • data collectiondesign innovation • dynamo • e-bike • electric bicycle • electric motor • environmentally conscious design • FlyKly • FlyKly App • GPS monitoring • integrated electric wheeliOS • Janez Frantar • Kickstarter proposal • Klemen Nagode • light weight • livable cities • Marko Jurincic • Matej Colja • motor • Niko Klansek • pedal assist • Peter Frantar • Peter Osterversnik • product designprototype • Rok Cresnik • Samo Frantar • SloveniaSlovenian • smartwatch • social connectivity • technology innovation • The Pebble (watch) • ubiquitous computingurban sustainabilitywheel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 AUGUST 2013

Search log analysis: What it is, what's been done, how to do it

"The use of data stored in transaction logs of Web search engines, Intranets, and Web sites can provide valuable insight into understanding the information–searching process of online searchers. This understanding can enlighten information system design, interface development, and devising the information architecture for content collections. This article presents a review and foundation for conducting Web search transaction log analysis. A methodology is outlined consisting of three stages, which are collection, preparation, and analysis. The three stages of the methodology are presented in detail with discussions of goals, metrics, and processes at each stage. Critical terms in transaction log analysis for Web searching are defined. The strengths and limitations of transaction log analysis as a research method are presented. An application to log client–side interactions that supplements transaction logs is reported on, and the application is made available for use by the research community. Suggestions are provided on ways to leverage the strengths of, while addressing the limitations of, transaction log analysis for Web–searching research. Finally, a complete flat text transaction log from a commercial search engine is available as supplementary material with this manuscript."

(Bernard J. Jansen, 2006)

Jansen, B. J. (2006). "Search log analysis: What it is, what's been done, how to do it." Library & Information Science Research 28(3): 407–432.

TAGS

2006 • access log • content collections • datadata collection • electronic record • extended log • human-computer interactioninformation architecture • information retrieval systems • information system design • information-searching process • interaction design • interface development • library systems • log file • online searcher • referrer log • referrer site • searchsearch enginesearch for information • search log analysis • searching application • searching episode • server-side data collection • transaction datatransaction log analysistransaction logging datatransaction logsweb application designweb search engine • web search transaction log analysis • web searching • web systems • web-searching research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 AUGUST 2013

An improved method of studying the user/search process in user-system interactions

"A major 'user/search process' limitation identified by Kinsella and Bryant (1987) is the inability to isolate and characterise individual users of on–line systems in order to describe the pattern of their use. Users' perceptions of their searches are not recorded, transaction logs cannot measure the information needs that users' are unable to express in their search statements (input), and they cannot reflect users' satisfaction with search results (output). As Kurth states, '[the fact] that transaction logs are unable to address such cognitive aspects of on–line searching behaviour is a true limit of the methodology' (Kurth, 1993: 100). Supplementary research, such as questionnaires, protocol analysis and interviews, must be undertaken in order to build a fuller picture of searching behaviour, success and satisfaction."

(Griffiths, J. R., R. J. Hartley, et al., 2002)

Jillian R. Griffiths, R.J. Hartley and Jonathan P. Willson. (2002). "An improved method of studying user–system interaction by combining transaction log analysis and protocol analysis." Information Research 7(4).

TAGS

2002 • characterising users • cognitive actionsdata collectiondata gathering instruments • electronic information resources • end user studiesend-users • information needs • Information Research (journal) • information system evaluation • information-seeking • information-seeking behaviourinterview (research method) • Janet Kinsella • Jillian Griffiths • Jonathan Willson • limitations of quantitative methodologies • Martin Kurth • online systems • open access journalpatterns of usepeer-reviewed journal • Philip Bryant • protocol analysisqualitative dataquestionnaire • Richard Hartley • search and retrieval • search behaviour • search logging • search process • search results • search results satisfaction • search statements • searchersearching and browsing • searching behaviour • searching for information • success and satisfaction • supplementary research • system requirements • talk-aloud comments • think aloud (research method)transaction log analysis • transaction logging • transaction logging datatransaction logsusability testing • user search process • user-based evaluation • user-system interaction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JUNE 2013

How to Cite Interviews

"Interviews are a useful means of obtaining information from individuals who have been directly involved with the topic or period one is researching. Such individuals are 'primary sources' who can provide data or perspectives which may not be available from other sources. Individual interviews are normally used to establish or support particular points in a paper; a series of structured interviews may also comprise an entire 'original research component' of a paper if they form a coherent body of new information on the research topic."

(University of Tampere, 22 January 2012)

TAGS

academic citation • book interviews • broadcast interviews • chat interviews • citation • citing electronic sources • citing interviews • citing print sources • coherent body of knowledge • data collectione-mail interviewselectronic media • electronic sources • Gerard Hopkins • individual interviewsindividual perspectives • instant messaging interviews • interview (research method)interviews • live broadcast interviews • magazine interviews • MLA • Modern Language Association • new information • original research • personal interviewsprimary sourcesprint media • published interviews • radio interviews • research paperresearch sourcesresearch topicstructured interviews • telephone interviews • television interviews • University of Tamperevideo interviews • webcast interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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