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30 NOVEMBER 2013

The Next Layer: a publishing platform for collaborative research

"'Weak link collaboration' refers to benefits that arise from researchers sharing a platform. As researchers post research journal entries (blogs), develop taxonomies, enter references and edit newsfeeds, they become aware of each others work and can discover new things and overlapping research interests. The development of interdisciplinary methodologies benefits from those features.

TNL is a tool which in particular supports the work of researchers involved in practice based PhDs yet is open to everyone with an interest in collaborative research practices.

TNL supports an open publishing policy. There is no 'one–size fits all' copyright licence for articles and other forms of content. Contributors are free to decide which licence they use or if they use no licence at all, yet the overall aim is to make high quality content available to the wider public."

(Armin Medosch)

TAGS

academic journals • academic peers • Armin Medosch • bibliographic references • collaboration resourcescollaborative research • collaborative research practices • Drupal • finished papers • hierarchically structured documents • interdisciplinary methodologies • online publishing • open publishing policy • overlapping research interests • peer preview • peer reviewpractice-based PhDspractice-based research • public viewing • research journal • research papersresearcherssharing platformtaxonomiestext editing • The Next Layer (TNL) • weak link collaboration • work-in-progress • working groups

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

Digital Humanities Now

"Digital Humanities Now showcases the scholarship and news of interest to the digital humanities community through a process of aggregation, discovery, curation, and review. Digital Humanities Now also is an experiment in ways to identify, evaluate, and distribute scholarship on the open web through a weekly publication and the quarterly Journal of Digital Humanities."

Editorial Board: Dan Cohen, Editor–in–Chief; Joan Fragaszy Troyano, Managing Editor; Sasha Hoffman, Editor; Jeri Wieringa, Editor.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Knowledge Unlatched: a new academic publishing business model

"The Problem: specialist books in the Humanities and Social Sciences (including but not exclusively monographs) are under threat due to spiralling prices and reduced library funds.

Access is restricted: while academics could choose to bypass existing publishers and just post content on the Web, the general consensus within academia is that they would prefer to have their books professionally published.

Only a few hundred copies make it into the eight to twelve thousand research universities, and very few teaching universities have access to these materials. For many individuals private purchase is beyond their reach.

A Possible Solution: cover the costs of creating the first digital copy through a library consortium and make the titles open access. Publishers would continue to generate additional revenues from the sale of print, ePub and PDFs in bespoke formats."

(Frances Pinter, 2011)

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TAGS

2011academiaacademic journals • academic publishing • academics • bespoke format • Bloomsbury Academicbookcontent on the webdigital convergencedigital copyeconomic changeepub • Frances Pinter • groupon • humanities and social sciences • journal subscription • knowledge access • knowledge economy • Knowledge Unlatched • library consortium • long form • long form publication • longform • longform publication • media landscape • monograph • new business modelsnew digital distribution networksold mediaopen accessPDFpeer review • professionally published • publicationpublisherpublishingpublishing model • reduced library funds • research universities • sale of printscholarly journals • specialist books • spiralling prices • teaching universities

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2012

Citations and impact factors are old hat: the Web 2.0 generation needs metrics to match today's scholarship

"As a young academic, I am reliably informed that the landscape of scholarly communication is not what it was 20 years ago. But, despite all that has changed, it seems that we still largely rely upon the same tired and narrow measures of quality and academic impact – namely, citation counts and journal impact factors.

As someone who has used the internet in almost every aspect of their academic work to date, it's hard for me to ignore the fact that these mechanisms, in predating the web, largely ignore its effects.

By holding up these measures as incentives, we appear to have our eye firmly fixed on the hammer and not the nail, adjusting our research habits in order to maximise scores and ignoring issues such as why we publish in the first place."

(Matthew Gamble, 28 July 2011, Times Higher Education)

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TAGS

academic blogs • academic discussion • academic impactacademic papersacademic work • alt-metrics • alt-metrics community • alt-metrics movement • altmetrics.org • assessing impactassessment of scholarshipblogCERNcitation • citation counts • citation-based measures • citation-based measures of impactdiverse metricsengaged scholars • existing measures • funding decisions • Harvard Universityimpact • impressions of impact • incentive • Internetjournal impact • journal impact factors • journal output • measurementmeasurement of impactMendeleymetricsnarrow measures • narrow measures of academic impact • narrow measures of quality • new measurement frontieronline • online reference-management service • peer review • platform for scholarly communication • practices of scholarly communication • products of scholarly communication • publication of academic papersquantitative study of scholarship • ReaderMeter • readermeter.org • real-time readership • reference manager • research habits • research impactresearch output • Rouse Ball • Samuel Arbesman • scholarly activity • scholarly activity on the web • scholarly communication • scientific discoveries • second scientific revolution • Tim Berners-Lee • timely indications of impact • Timothy Gowers • traces of scholarship • TwitterUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of North Carolina • utility of the web • Web 2.0 • web as a platform • young academics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MAY 2011

I'm A Climate Scientist (Director's Cut)

"Written and performed by Climate Scientists, Dan Ilic, Duncan Elms and production by Brendan Woithe at Colony NoFi [for the Power Episode of #hungrybeast]."

(Dan Ilic, 10 May 2011)

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TAGS

2011ABC TV (Australia)Alan Jones • Andrew Bolt • atmosphereAustralia • Brendan Woithe • carbon tax • climateclimate changeclimate contrariansclimate scienceclimate scientists • Colony NoFi • community involvement through performanceconsequencesCopenhagen Climate Summit (2009)critique • Dan Ilic • diegetic sound • Duncan Elms • ethicsglobal warming • greenhouse • heat wave • hip-hopHungry Beasticemethanenatural environmentnaturepeer review • permafrost • PhD student • raprepresentationresponsibilitysciencescience researchscientific evidencetransformation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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