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Which clippings match 'Google Docs' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 MARCH 2014

7th grade student: Welcome to My PLE!

"Seventh grade life science student gives a tour of her personal learning environment. Design based research project was conducted for Networked Student dissertation."

(Wendy Drexler, 2009)

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TAGS

2009 • 7th grade • autonomy • box jellyfish • connectivism • design based research project • e-learning 2.0e-pedagogyeducational technologyelearning • Evernote • FacebookGlogster EDUGoogle Docs • iGoogle • learner responsibility • learning teachnology • leopard gecko • life science • Netvibes • networked student • PageFlakes • paperless • peer-reviewed • personal learning centres • Personal Learning EnvironmentPLE • Pocket Tanks • reflective bloggingscience education • seventh grade • Skype • structured enquiry • studentSymbalooEDUteaching science • Wendy Drexler

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2010

Breakthrough Learning in a Digital Age: New Learning Designs

Jason Levy, Principal, New York City Intermediate School 339

Larry Rosenstock, Founder, High Tech High School Network

Katie Salen, Executive Director, Institute of Play, Professor of Design and

Technology, and Director of the Center for Transformative Media, Parsons the

New School for Design

Rey Ramsey, CEO, One Economy Corporation

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TAGS

2009 • Breakthrough Learning in a Digital Age • Dot-to-Dot 2009 • Google DocsGoogle IncHigh Tech High • IS 339 • Jason Levy • Katie Salen • Larry Rosenstocklearning • learning in a digital age • new learning designs • New Yorkonline lecturespedagogy • Rey Ramsey • teachingtechnologyTwitter

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 AUGUST 2009

Google Docs: the networked computer classroom?

"The networked computer classroom has always held out the promise of improved collaboration and peer review of documents. The foundational work in this area was based on social constructionist theory ( e.g., Barker & Kemp 1990; Cooper & Selfe 1990; Hawisher & Selfe 1991): scholars saw networked writing as a concrete application of social constructionism, which emphasized collaborative writing, and consequently produced collaborative tools (such as the Daedalus Interactive Writing Environment and the enCore MOO). More recently, content management systems and wikis have joined the list of ways to collaborate. All allow participants to review, co–edit, and comment on a single text in a single space.

However, these technologies have tended to fill relatively narrow niches, due in part to the learning curve for using them (most people don't want to learn special markup) and the need for specialized hardware and software to run them (most people don't have dedicated servers to run a CMS). Not surprisingly, most documents –– in university settings and in business collaborations –– are still created in Microsoft Word or another word processor, and emailed from collaborator to collaborator (a practice known as "ping–ponging"). This solution is a variation of the timeworn solution of handing drafts from person to person. And it has the same drawback: it's impossible for multiple people to work simultaneously on the same draft without versioning problems. Nevertheless, people limp along with this solution because it has a shallow learning curve and leverages existing services.
...
In August 2006, Google launched Google Apps for Your Domain, a suite of tools that includes email, calendar, and website design software (Google Mail, Calendar, and Page Creator), and is aggressively marketing the suite to the education market and small businesses. In essence, these organizations can outsource a chunk of their information technology to Google, and Google brands these services for each organization. This service is particularly valuable to the education and small business markets since these relatively small organizations frequently devote considerable IT resources to electronic collaboration and publication, and they have trouble holding on to people with deep IT expertise.
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Eventually the product relaunched as Google Docs, integrated with Google's spreadsheet offering
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Google Docs Features The headline news about Google Docs is that the application supports easy parallel collaboration. Once you've logged in, you see a list of the most recent documents (word processor files and spreadsheets) and the collaborators who have been working on them. You can choose to share your own documents with collaborators at a variety of permissions levels –– and they can similarly choose to share theirs with you. "
(Clay Spinuzzi, University of Texas at Austin)

Barker, T. and Kemp, F. (1990). Network theory: A postmodern pedagogy for the writing classroom. In Handa, C., editor, Computers and Community: Teaching Composition in the Twenty–First Century, pages 1–27. Boynton/Cook Publishers, New York.

Cooper, M. and Selfe, C. L. (1990). Computer conferences and learning: Authority, resistance, and internally persuasive discourse. College English, 52:847–869.

Hawisher, G. E. and Selfe, C. L. (1991). The rhetoric of technology and the electronic writing class. College Composition and Communication, 42:55–65.

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TAGS

authoringauthorshipclassroomCMScollaboration • collaborative writing • Daedalus Interactive Writing Environment • DIWEeducation • electronic literacy • enCore MOO • Google AppsGoogle DocsGoogle Inc • Google Spreadsheets • interactionlearningMicrosoft WordMOOpaedagogyparticipatory learningpedagogypeer review • ping-ponging • scriptible • versioning • wikiWritely (Upstartle)writing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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