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25 APRIL 2015

Supersymmetry: a immersive aesthetic experience by Ryoji Ikeda

"Supersymmetry attempts to transform the complexity of quantum information theory into an immersive aesthetic experience, meshing sound, visual data and high-speed light displays. The show pairs two inter-related installations. As you step into the cavernous, pitch-black space at the top of Brewer Street Car Park in Soho, you're confronted by [experiment]. Three 1m x 1m light boxes, glowing white, skitter and whoosh with tiny ball bearings, forming unique and unpredictable patterns. It's a disorientating experience, leaving you feeling adrift in such a frenetic space, with red lasers constantly scanning the surface movements.

As you step through the curtain into the next space, [experience], you're plunged into the middle of two 20m-long screens, blinking with forty monitors, all displaying how the previous room's data has been analysed and translated. The synchronized monitors pulse with high-speed analyses and typed text, while the electronic soundscape -- a symphony of bleeps, buzzes and droning hums -- adds to the charged atmosphere. The overall effect, as you glance at the mutating text and the rapid-fire bombardment of data, is both hypnotic and hallucinatory, and yet there's also something strangely oppressive about being caught in this endless loop of sound and information."

(Daniel Culpan, 23 April 2015, Wired)

"Supersymmetry" by Ryoji Ikeda, 2015. The exhibition runs at The Vinyl Factory Space at Brewer Street Car Park, London, W1F 0LA, until 31 May 2015.

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2015aesthetic experienceart and scienceart exhibitionartist in residence • artistic response • austere ambienceball bearings • beeps • bleeps • buzzes • CERN • charged atmosphere • complexity • dark space • disorientating experience • droning • electronic soundscape • emotionally empty art • endless loop • hallucinatory • Higgs boson • humming • hyper-sensory experience • hypnoticimmersive aesthetic experience • Japanese artist • Japanese visual artist • Large Hadron Collider • light installationlight pulseslightboxmodernist aesthetics • multistorey building • particle accelerator • particle research • physics • quantum information theory • Ryoji Ikeda • sound and imagestrobing • Supersymmetry (2015) • symmetry • The Vinyl Factory • unique patterns • unpredictable patterns • visual artistvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisual spectacular • whooshes • Wired (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2012

Citations and impact factors are old hat: the Web 2.0 generation needs metrics to match today's scholarship

"As a young academic, I am reliably informed that the landscape of scholarly communication is not what it was 20 years ago. But, despite all that has changed, it seems that we still largely rely upon the same tired and narrow measures of quality and academic impact – namely, citation counts and journal impact factors.

As someone who has used the internet in almost every aspect of their academic work to date, it's hard for me to ignore the fact that these mechanisms, in predating the web, largely ignore its effects.

By holding up these measures as incentives, we appear to have our eye firmly fixed on the hammer and not the nail, adjusting our research habits in order to maximise scores and ignoring issues such as why we publish in the first place."

(Matthew Gamble, 28 July 2011, Times Higher Education)

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academic blogs • academic discussion • academic impactacademic papersacademic work • alt-metrics • alt-metrics community • alt-metrics movement • altmetrics.org • assessing impactassessment of scholarshipblogCERNcitation • citation counts • citation-based measures • citation-based measures of impactdiverse metricsengaged scholars • existing measures • funding decisions • Harvard Universityimpact • impressions of impact • incentive • Internetjournal impact • journal impact factors • journal output • measurementmeasurement of impactMendeleymetricsnarrow measures • narrow measures of academic impact • narrow measures of quality • new measurement frontieronline • online reference-management service • peer review • platform for scholarly communication • practices of scholarly communication • products of scholarly communication • publication of academic papersquantitative study of scholarship • ReaderMeter • readermeter.org • real-time readership • reference manager • research habits • research impactresearch output • Rouse Ball • Samuel Arbesman • scholarly activity • scholarly activity on the web • scholarly communication • scientific discoveries • second scientific revolution • Tim Berners-Lee • timely indications of impact • Timothy Gowers • traces of scholarship • TwitterUniversity of CambridgeUniversity of North Carolina • utility of the web • Web 2.0 • web as a platform • young academics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 APRIL 2010

The Virtual Library: the oldest catalogue of the Web

"The WWW Virtual Library (VL) is the oldest catalogue of the Web, started by Tim Berners–Lee, the creator of HTML and of the Web itself, in 1991 at CERN in Geneva. Unlike commercial catalogues, it is run by a loose confederation of volunteers, who compile pages of key links for particular areas in which they are expert; even though it isn't the biggest index of the Web, the VL pages are widely recognised as being amongst the highest–quality guides to particular sections of the Web."

(The WWW Virtual Library)

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1991catalogueCERNdigital cultureGenevahistoryHTMLICTindexinnovationonlinepioneeringqualitySwitzerlandtaxonomyTim Berners-Leevirtual library • VL • volunteerweb

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2009

Hyperland: 1990 fantasy documentary speculating about the future of interactive media

"In this one–hour documentary produced by the BBC in 1990, Douglas falls asleep in front of a television and dreams about future time when he may be allowed to play a more active role in the information he chooses to digest. A software agent, Tom (played by Tom Baker), guides Douglas around a multimedia information landscape, examining (then) cuttting–edge research by the SF Multimedia Lab and NASA Ames research center, and encountering hypermedia visionaries such as Vannevar Bush and Ted Nelson. Looking back now, it's interesting to see how much he got right and how much he didn't: these days, no one's heard of the SF Multimedia Lab, and his super–high–tech portrayal of VR in 2005 could be outdone by a modern PC with a 3D card. However, these are just minor niggles when you consider how much more popular the technologies in question have become than anyone could have predicted – for while Douglas was creating Hyperland, a student at CERN in Switzerland was working on a little hypertext project he called the World Wide Web..."
(douglasadams.com)

Adams, D. N. (1990). Hyperland. UK, BBC Two: 50 minutes.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2008

W3C: standardising the web

"The W3C mission is to lead the World Wide Web to its full potential by developing protocols and guidelines that ensure the long–term growth of the Web. Below we discuss important aspects of this mission, all of which further W3C's vision of One Web."

(World Wide Web Consortium)

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19941995adoption of standardsagreementARPAnetCERN • compatibility • computer scienceconsortium • core principles • DARPA • Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency • digital cultureEuropean Commission • European Organization for Nuclear Research • guidelinesHTML • incompatibility • inconsistency • industry members • information technology • INRIA • international communityInternet • Jeffrey Jaffe • knowledge management • LCS • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory • member organisations • MITnew medianew standardsone webontologypredictabilityprinciplesprotocolssemantic websoftware engineeringsolutionspecificationstandardisationstandards compliantstandards-based web technologiesstructurestructured datatechnologyTim Berners-Leeunificationusability • vendors • W3Cwebweb pagesweb standards • World Wide Web Consortium

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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