Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Creative Commons' keyword pg.1 of 3
10 NOVEMBER 2012

Sita Sings the Blues: audience-distributed animated feature film

"I hereby give Sita Sings the Blues to you. Like all culture, it belongs to you already, but I am making it explicit with a Creative Commons Attribution–Share Alike License. Please distribute, copy, share, archive, and show Sita Sings the Blues. From the shared culture it came, and back into the shared culture it goes.

You don't need my permission to copy, share, publish, archive, show, sell, broadcast, or remix Sita Sings the Blues. Conventional wisdom urges me to demand payment for every use of the film, but then how would people without money get to see it? How widely would the film be disseminated if it were limited by permission and fees? Control offers a false sense of security. The only real security I have is trusting you, trusting culture, and trusting freedom.

That said, my colleagues and I will enforce the Share Alike License. You are not free to copy–restrict ('copyright') or attach Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to Sita Sings the Blues or its derivative works.

Some of the songs in Sita Sings the Blues are not free, and may never be; copyright law requires you to obey their respective licenses. This is not by my choice; please see our restrictions page for more.

There is the question of how I'll get money from all this. My personal experience confirms audiences are generous and want to support artists. Surely there's a way for this to happen without centrally controlling every transaction. The old business model of coercion and extortion is failing. New models are emerging, and I'm happy to be part of that. But we're still making this up as we go along. You are free to make money with the free content of Sita Sings the Blues, and you are free to share money with me. People have been making money in Free Software for years; it's time for Free Culture to follow. I look forward to your innovations."

(Nina Paley)

1

TAGS

attribution-share alike • audience-distributioncoercioncontrol • copy-restrict • copyrightcopyright lawCreative Commonsderivative works • Digital Restrictions Management • disseminationDRMeconomic model • emerging economic models • film fundingfree contentfree culture • free culture movement • free softwarefreedom • making money • Nina Paley • old business model • open distribution • payment • permission • Ramayana • Share Alike License • shared culture • Sita Sings the Blues • support artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Teach and Learn Online: Die LMS die! You too PLE!

"The PLE project recognises the fundamental flaws in Virtual Learning Environments or Learning Management Systems (VLE, LMS), but falls short in its vision of an alternative. At this stage in the project it is suggesting that the PLE be a desktop application for a student (sounds a bit like my old Perfect LMS idea) or a singular portal online.

At risk of sounding like a broken record, I'll have to repeat my defining question about Internet enhanced learning, but this time in response to the PLE.

Question to the PLE: Why do we need a PLE when we already have the Internet? The Internet is my PLE, ePortfolio, VLE what ever. Thanks to blogger, bloglines, flickr, delicious, wikispaces, ourmedia, creative commons, and what ever comes next in this new Internet age, I have a strong online ID and very extensive and personalised learning environment. Actually I think the PLE idea is better envisioned by the futurist concept known as the Evolving Personalised Information Construct (EPIC). I think we already have EPIC, so why do we need the PLE?

To extend the statement: We insignificant little teachers and our out of date schools and classrooms don't need to be investing in media projects like VLEs, LMS and even PLEs. Our dam walls of knowledge have burst! and no amount of sand bagging will stop the flood that is clearly discrediting our authority over learning. Media, and with it communications, will evolve (as it certainly has in the last 50 years or more) well beyond the limitations of our classrooms, with investments and broadcast influence we can't even fathom. Why waste our precious money and time on projects that only serve to suspend our true position within that media scape. The PLE makes me think of ELGG, and it all makes me wonder why it is we educationalists still think we are even relevant anymore. The people (yes that includes us) are learning how to read and write for themselves, and in an amazing act of collective generosity, the people are teaching each other – why do they even need our classrooms... is it perhaps only credentialism that we offer? Or is it also sense of security and safety? Is it false?"

(Leigh Blackall, 13 November 2005)

Fig.1 "Lords of Graphite" by 5star (Neil Caldwell).

1

TAGS

2005authorised voiceBlogger (software) • Bloglines • broadcast societycentralised platformclassrooms • collective generosity • Creative CommonscredentialismDeliciousdesktop application • desktop classroom • e-portfolio • educationalists • ELGG • EPIC (acronym) • ePortfolio • Evolving Personalised Information Construct • Flickrgift cultureinformation literacy • internet enhanced learning • learning and teaching • learning centre • Learning Management System • learning media • learning platform • learning portal • Leigh Blackall • LMSmedia literacymediascape • network literate • new Internet age • online portal • open Internet • Ourmedia • out of date • personalised learning environment • pervasive mediaPLEschools • singular portal online • virtual learning environmentsVLEWikispaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 APRIL 2012

Open Educational Resources: Khan Academy

"The Khan Academy is an organization on a mission. We're a not–for–profit with the goal of changing education for the better by providing a free world–class education to anyone anywhere.

All of the site's resources are available to anyone. It doesn't matter if you are a student, teacher, home–schooler, principal, adult returning to the classroom after 20 years, or a friendly alien just trying to get a leg up in earthly biology. The Khan Academy's materials and resources are available to you completely free of charge."

(Khan Academy)

Fig.1 Francis Bacon, Triptych – August 1972, 1972, oil on canvas, 72 x 61 x 22 in. (183 x 155 x 64 cm), (Tate Modern, London).

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 SEPTEMBER 2011

ccMixter: downloadable Creative Commons music

"ccMixter is a community music site featuring remixes licensed under Creative Commons where you can listen to, sample, mash–up, or interact with music in whatever way you want."

(ccMixter)

1

TAGS

authorship • ccHost • ccMixterCreative Commonscreative commons audiodownloadmash-upmediamixtapemusicremixremix cultureroyalty free • royalty free music • scriptiblesharingWired (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JUNE 2011

MOSAIC project: enabling UK HE library to take up Web2.0 opportunities

"MOSAIC is building on the findings and recommendations of the JISC TILE project, which investigated 'pain points' in UK HE library take up of Web2.0 opportunities, in particular relating to the 'context' of users (e.g. their course) and their related use of resources."

(JISC MOSAIC)

1). Mosaic data collection – A guide v01.pdf

2). Sharing Usage Data–Dave Pattern & Patrick Murray–John Talk with Talis

3). The JISC MOSAIC Project: Making Our Scholarly Activity Information Count, Final Report (January 2010)

TAGS

2009 • activity data • CC0 • Cloud of Data • common data schema • context of users • Creative Commons • Creative Commons CC0 • datadataset • Dave Pattern • David Kay • e-Framework • ERM system • Helen Harrop • higher educationinformation resourcesinnovationJISC • JISC TILE project • Joint Academic Coding System • Ken Chad • learning object download • libraryLibrary 2.0Library Management Systemslibrary science • local activity data • Making Our Shared Activity Information Count • Mark van Harmelen • modify • MOSAIC project • Open Data Commons PDDL • Open Data licence • Paul Miller • PDDL • promoting experimentation • reading lists • recommender • Resolver journal article access • resource discovery • scalability • Sero Consulting • service models • shareTalis AspireUK • UK HE library • universityUniversity of Huddersfielduser activity data • user activity driven services • VLE resource • Web 2.0

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.