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Which clippings match 'South America' keyword pg.1 of 2
01 MAY 2015

Berta Cáceres 2015 Goldman Prize Recipient South and Central America

"In a country with growing socioeconomic inequality and human rights violations, Berta Cáceres rallied the indigenous Lenca people of Honduras and waged a grassroots campaign that successfully pressured the world’s largest dam builder to pull out of the Agua Zarca Dam.

(Goldman Environmental Foundation)

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TAGS

2015 • Agua Zarca Dam • Berta Caceres • blockade • Central America • community resistance • consultation • COPINH • dam • demand for cheap energy • Desarrollos Energeticos SA (DESA) • disenfranchised people • displaced indigenous communities • environmental activist • environmental impactenvironmentalist • environmentally destructive projects • Goldman Environmental Foundation • grassroots campaign • Gualcarque River • Hondurashuman rights • human rights activist • human rights violationIndigenous communities • indigenous rights • inspirational leader • Inter-American Human Rights Commission • International Finance Corporation (IFC) • landland custodianshipLatin America • Lenca people • mining • mining operations • murder • National Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras • peaceful protest • Rio Blanco • riversacred sites • Sinohydro • social activist • socioeconomic inequality • South Americasymbolic place • Tomas Garcia • uprooting communities • World Bank

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 APRIL 2013

Eurocentrism permeates our common cartographic representations

"on most maps, Europe and North America are situated on top–allowing us to believe that these countries are really 'on top of the world'. Africa, Australia and South America are always situated at the bottom. Why never the other way around? Cartographers make assumptions about the world (North is assumed to be at the top) and these assumptions have become normalised and are viewed as 'common sense'.

But these politically embedded assumptions help to structure how we see the world and our place in it. Few of us ever stop to think about the politics of cartography and what it says about Western cultural and economic imperialism and domination. Few ever think how these unexamined assumptions structure the way we see ourselves, to what extent and on what basis we rate our own worth (or supposed, entirely imagined, lack thereof) or how it restricts our imagination and limits the ways in which we think it is possible to excel and thrive in this world."

(Pierre De Vos, 23 April 2013)

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Africa • apolitical • assumptionsAustraliaBritish Librarycartographic metaphorcartographic representationscartographychartcultural artefactcultural hegemonycultural imperialism • economic imperialism • economic significance • Eurocentric legacy • Eurocentrism • Europegeopolitical mapgraphic representationhistorical maphistorical narrativeshow we see the worldinformation visualisationinterpretationmapsmetaphors of reality • neo-European • neutralnormalisation process • normalised • North America • Northern hemisphere • objective perspective • our place in the world • physical geography • political assumptions • politics of cartographypost-colonialismpostcolonial • postcoloniality • reterritorialisationSouth AfricaSouth America • Southern hemisphere • standardised classification • The Lie of the Land (exhibition) • the worldthe world around us • top • understanding of the worldunexamined assumptions • visual critique • visual representationworld mapsworld politicsworld view

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2012

Landfill Harmonic: creating music from recycled materials

"Landfill Harmonic tells the story of 'Los Reciclados' – 'The Recycled Orchestra' – a youth orchestra in Cateura, Paraguay, whose instruments are made out of the very trash that the town is built on.

WHEN FAVIO CHAVEZ AND LUIS SZARAN came to Cateura to start a music school, they realized that they had more students than instruments. Thanks to the resourcefulness of Cola, a Cateurian garbage picker, an orchestra came together, now featuring violins, cellos, and other instruments artfully put together from trash. Los Reciclados de Cateura, now an independent orchestra, recently performed in Brazil and Colombia under Chavez's direction."

(Nina Mashurova, 12 December 2012, Matador)

Trailer for "Landfill Harmonic". The project is being created by Alejandra Nash (Founder and Executive Producer), Juliana Penaranda–Loftus (Producer), Rodolfo Madero (Executive Producer), Jorge Maldonado (Co–producer), Graham
Townsley (Director) Jennifer Redfearn (Consulting producer), Tim Fabrizio and Neil Barrett (Directors of Photography) and Monica Barrios (Production Consultant).

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2012 • Alejandra Nash • awareness raising • Cateura • Creative Visions Foundation • debrisdetritusDIY ethicdocumentary • Favio Chavez • garbage • Graham Townsley • improvisationinspiring people • Jennifer Redfearn • Jorge Maldonado • Juliana Penaranda-Loftus • junk • landfill • Landfill Harmonic (film) • Landfill Orchestra • Los Reciclados • Luis Szaran • Monica Barrios • music • music programme • music teacher • musical education • musical instrument • Neil Barrett • Nicolas Gomez • nonprofitorchestraParaguaypositive changepovertyrecycled garbagerecycled materials • Rodolfo Madero • rubbishslumsocial entrepreneurshipsocial transformationSouth America • The Recycled Orchestra • Tim Fabrizio • trailertransformation • violin • waste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JUNE 2011

Uncontacted tribe found deep in Amazon rainforest

"Brazilian authorities say they have pinpointed the location of a community of ancient and uncontacted tribespeople in one of the remotest corners of the Amazon rainforest.

Fabricio Amorim, a regional co–ordinator for Brazil's indigenous foundation, Funai, said the indigenous community had been found after three small forest clearings were detected on satellite images. Flyovers were carried out in April, confirming the community's existence.

Four straw–roofed huts, flanked by banana trees and encircled by thick jungle, can be seen in photographs taken during the flyover.

The community is likely to be home to about 200 people, probably from the Pano linguistic group which straddles the border between Brazil, Peru and Bolivia, according to Funai.

Amorim said the region – known as the Vale do Javari – contained 'the greatest concentration of isolated groups in the Amazon and the world' but warned of growing threats to their survival."

(Tom Phillips, 22 June 2011, The Guardian, UK)

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2011aerial viewAmazon rainforestancient people • banana trees • BoliviaBrazil • clearings • communityethicsexistence • Fabricio Amorim • flyover • forest clearings • forest-dwelling peoples • FUNAI • independenceIndigenousindigenous community • indigenous foundation • Indigenous peopleindigenous peoples • isolated groups • isolation • jungle • National Indian Foundation • natives • Pano linguistic group • Peruphotographspreservationprotectionrainforestremote communitiessatellite imagessatellite picturesSouth America • straw-roofed huts • sustainable future • threats to their survival • tribal communities • uncontacted community • uncontacted tribespeople • Vale do Javari

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2011

Computer Art at the Victoria and Albert Museum

"The V&A has been collecting computer–generated art and design since the 1960s. More recently, the Museum acquired two significant collections of computer–generated art and design, and together these form the basis of the UK's emerging national collection of Computer Art.

The Museum's holdings range from early experiments with analogue computers and mechanical devices, to examples of contemporary software–based practices that produce digital prints and computer–generated drawings. The earliest work in the collection dates from 1952 and is a long exposure photograph of electronic beams on an analogue computer, by artist Ben Laposky.

More recently, the V&A has acquired a large digital inkjet print from 2008, which is nearly two metres long and was created using pixel mapping software designed by American artist Mark Wilson.

The collection consists predominately of two–dimensional works on paper, such as plotter drawings, screenprints, inkjet prints, laser prints and photographs, as well as artists' books, from around the world. Early practitioners of computer art were working in Britain, France, Germany, and Spain, as well as the United States, Japan and South America."

(Victoria and Albert Museum)

Fig.1 Herbert W. Franke 'Oscillogramm' (1956)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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