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Which clippings match 'Spirituality' keyword pg.1 of 2
06 JULY 2015

Lee Scratch Perry's Vision of Paradise

"This is the ultimate portrait of one of the icons of contemporary music. Shooting over 15 years, Volker Schaner had unprecedented access to the man who can lay claim to be a godfather of both reggae and dub. Lee 'Scratch' Perry's Vision of Paradise is funny, poetic and frequently mind-blowing."

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2015 • Adrian Sherwood • black culture • Bob Marley and the Wailers • cast a long shadow • chugging beat • contemporary music icon • Daniela Schmid • David Katz • Dennis Bovell • documentary video • dub • dub music • eccentric character • fairytale documentary • ground-breaking workinfluential musician • innovative studio techniques • Irmin Schmidt • Jamaica • Jamaican • Jomo Charles • Jonathan Scratchley • Junior Byles • Junior Murvin • Lee Scratch Perry • legendary musician • Martin Glover • Max Romeo • mind-blowing • mixing desk • music documentarymusic producermusic samplingmusician • Neil Fraser • Nick Manasseh • Peter Harris • production techniques • production values • psychedelic imageryreggae • reggae producer • remix cultureremixing • Ria Higgins • spirituality • Steve Marshall • studio effects • studio recording • The Black Ark • The Orb (band) • Thomas Lauterbacher • Vision of Paradise (2015) • Volker Schaner

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2015

Belief in the here and now: a Humanist perspective

Written & produced by the British Humanist Association, and narrated by Stephen Fry. Animated by Hyebin Lee. Thank you to Alom Shaha, Craig Duncan, Andrew Copson, and Sara Passmore That's Humanism logo design by Nick Cousin

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2D animationafterlifeanimated short filmbelief systemsbeliefs • biological death • British Humanist Association • consciousnesscontemplating mortalitydeathdisembodimentdyingend of life • eternal life • existentialismfaith • faith in nature • fulfilmentheaven • here and now • human consciousnesshumanism • Hyebin Lee • life • making the most of life • material realitymaterial worldmortalitynothingnessobjective realityrationalist perspectiverealm of existence • reincarnation • spiritualityStephen Fry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2015

Hindu Creation Stories

"Most religions have a single creation story. Hinduism has many. This is because for Hindus there is no single creation, but periodic cycles of creation. The universe we live in is one of innumerable universes. Narrated by Gillian Anderson. Scripted by Nigel Warburton."

(BBC Radio 4)

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Ananta Sesha • BBC Radio 4belief • Bra (deity) • Brahma • Brahma (god) • Brahman • bull • calf • cobra • Cognitive • cowcreation narrative • creation stories • creation story • Creator Beingsdarkness • deity • Earth • Gillian Anderson • godsheavenHindu • Hinduism • Hindusim • history of ideashorse • innumerable universes • lotus flower • mare • meditationmultiplicityNigel Warburtonnothingnessorigin myth • periodic cycles of creation • religionserpent • Shiva (god) • skyspirituality • The Open University • universe • Vishnu (deity)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2014

Songlines: How Indigenous Australians Use Music to Mark Geography

"There are many different methods of pre–literate navigation that have been documented around the world. One of the most unique, a fusion of navigation and oral mythological storytelling, originated among the indigenous peoples of Australia, who navigated their way across the land using paths called songlines or dreaming tracks. In Aboriginal mythology, a songline is a myth based around localised 'creator–beings' during the Dreaming, the indigenous Australian embodiment of the creation of the Earth. Each songline explains the route followed by the creator–being during the course of the myth. The path of each creator–being is marked in sung lyrics. One navigates across the land by repeating the words of the song or re–enacting the story through dance, which in the course of telling the story also describe the location of various landmarks on the landscape (e.g. rock formations, watering holes, rivers, trees). In some cases, the paths of the creator–beings are said to be evident from their marks on the land (petrosomatoglyphs), such as large depressions in the land which are said to be their footprints (parallels can certainly be seen in some North American First Nation creation stories).

Songlines often came in sequences, much like a symphony or album today. By singing a song cycle in the appropriate order could navigate vast distances, often travelling through the deserts of Australia's interior (a fact which amazed early anthropologists who were stunned by Aborigines that frequently walked across hundreds of kilometres of desert picking out tiny features along the way without error). Each group had its own set of songlines that were passed from generation to generation so that future generations would know how to navigate when in neighbouring tribes' territories. The extensive system of songlines in Australia varied in length from a few kilometres to hundreds of kilometres in length crossing through lands of many different Indigenous peoples. Since a songline can span the lands of several different language groups, different parts of some songlines were in different languages corresponding to the region the songline was navigating through at the time, and thus could only be fully understood by a person speaking all of the languages in the song."

(The Basement Geographer, 21 October 2010)

Fig.1 "What are song lines?" Colin Jones, lecturer in Aboriginal History, talks about his culture, his history and his art. Queensland Rural Medical Education.

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Aboriginal mythologyancestral beings • ancestral heroes • animist belief systemAustralia • Colin Jones • creation narrative • creation spirits • Creator Beingscultural memory • cultural webs of memory • dreaming (spirituality) • dreaming tracks • earth motherFirst AustraliansFirst Nations • genii loci • geographical point • Indigenous Australians • kin-grouping system • kinship • landmarkslandscapelocationmappingmarkers • mythological storytelling • navigation systemnavigational methodsoral historiesorientationorigin myth • paths • petrosomatoglyph • place • point-to-point • pre-literate navigation • pre-literate societiessequences and spatial practisessmooth space • song cycle • songlinesspatial literacyspatial narrativespiritualitysymbolic placeterritorytimeless timetopology • totemic ancestors • voice map • watering holewayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MARCH 2013

Dorothy Iannone's Innocent and Aware

Dorothy Iannone, "Innocent and Aware", 8 March 2013 – 5 May 2013, Camden Arts Centre in London.

"Iannone's portrayals of male and female sexuality celebrate the joy of her most intimate relationships while subverting traditional gender stereotypes of dominance and control. Through graphic paintings, sculptures and video boxes her works depict partly–clothed and naked figures on bright psychedelic backgrounds of flora, mandalas and biomorphic patterns. Recalling classical Indian erotic art, Egyptian frescoes and Byzantine mosaics, Iannone's intricate work communicates a personal narrative, passionate love affairs and lifetime pursuit of 'ecstatic unity' through transcendence and spirituality."

(Camden Arts Centre, 2013)

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201320th century artartistbiomorphic • biomorphic patterns • ByzantineCamden Arts Centrecontroldominance • Dorothy Iannone • ecstasy • ecstatic unity • erotic artexhibitionexplicit sexual imageryfemale artistfemale sexuality • fresco • gender representationgender stereotypesgenitals • graphic paintings • innocenceintimacyintimate sexuality • love affair • lovemaking • mandala • mosaicnaive stylenaively drawn figuresnaked figuresNorth American artistpenispersonal narrativephysical lovepsychedelicpsychedelic imageryself-taughtsex • sexual liberation • sexual politicssexualityshock artspectacle • spiritual awareness • spiritualitytranscendence • unconditional love • vagina • video box • vulvawomen artistswomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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