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Which clippings match 'First Nations' keyword pg.1 of 2
19 JANUARY 2016

Skins: Designing Games with First Nations Youth

"Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), based out of Obx Labs at Concordia University in Montreal and directed by Lewis and Skawennati Fragnito, is a network of academics, artists, and technologists that encourages Indigenous participation in online culture and exploration of new media technology. The main objective of the AbTeC research network is to discover, define, and implement methods by which Indigenous people can use networked communication technology to strengthen our cultures. In an effort to overcome the economic, social, and cultural factors that influence the low rate of Indigenous participation in the making of new media and encourage Indigenous representation in digital games and virtual worlds specifically, AbTeC proposed to conduct Skins, a game/virtual world development workshop for Aboriginal youth that teaches them design programming, art, animation, and audio. ...

In conducting Skins, our goal is to encourage First Nations youth to be more than consumers of digital media; rather, we wish to show them how they themselves can be creators who can approach games with a critical perspective and from within their own cultural context. We are motivated by the possibilities of digital games and virtual environments for Indigenous peoples as well as correcting or adding to representations of Indigenous peoples in commercial games. Indigenous peoples' survival, recovery, development, and self-determination hinges on the preservation and revitalization of languages, social and spiritual practices, social relations, and arts [1]. Digital games and virtual environments, with their unique combination of story, design, code, architecture, art, animation, and sound [2], provide a rich medium though which to explore different strategies for pursuing such preservation and revitalization. For example, Thornton Media's RezWorld is a virtual environment for learning the Cherokee language. It has even been argued that the fluid, open, and networked characteristics of modern digital media make it particularly useful as a tool for Aboriginal storytelling, with Loretta Todd, Cree/Métis filmmaker and Director of the Aboriginal Media Arts Lab, suggesting 'the experience of cyberspace offers the reversal of narrative as derived from storytelling, a return to oral tradition' [3]. Furthermore, due to the radical decrease in the costs of the means of production and distribution, digital games and virtual worlds present Indigenous people with a powerful opportunity to widely (or narrowly) communicate stories in which we shape our own representation."

(Beth Aileen Lameman and Jason Edward Lewis, 2011)

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2011Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal Media Arts Lab • Aboriginal storytelling • Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC) • Aboriginal youth • Bart Simon • Beth Aileen Lameman • CanadaCelia Pearce • Cherokee language • Christian Beauclair • community participatory project • Concordia University • Cree • cultural representations • development workshop • digital games • digital media and learning • Dogrib • First NationsFirst Nations youth • Haudenosaunee • Indigenous cultural production • Indigenous participation • Indigenous peopleindigenous peoples • Indigenous representation in digital games • Indigenous representation in virtual worlds • Iroquois • Jason Edward Lewis • Journal of Game Design and Development Education • Katherine Isbister • Ken Finney • language preservation • Loretta Todd • Louise Profeit • making new media • Metis • Mohawk • Montreal • more than consumers • Myron Lameman • Nacho Nyak Dun • Nehiraw • new media artist • new media technologiesNorth American • Obx Labs at Concordia University • oral traditionresearch network • revitalisation of languages • RezWorld • Richard Van Camp • self-determination • Skawennati Fragnito • spiritual practices • Steve Loft • Steve Sanderson • Thornton Media • traditional culturevideo game designvideo games and Indigenous peoplevirtual environmentsvirtual worlds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2015

Brett Leavy: The Virtual Meanjin Project

"Brett Leavy is an immersive heritage specialist, virtual historian and artist. His innovative idea to recreate the real environment for mapping Indigenous culture and heritage stems from his passion to educate the community about Indigenous history."

(ABC Open)

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ABC Open • arts and cultural practices • Australian Indigenous communities • Brett Leavycultural heritagecultural identitycultural spacesculture and customs • culture and heritage • First Nationsfloraflora and faunafood gathering activities • guesstimation • historical recreation • Human Ventures • immersive gaming • immersive heritage • immersive heritage experienceIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous communitiesIndigenous cultural knowledge • Indigenous culture • Indigenous heritageindigenous history • Indigenous stories • interactive immersive simulation experience • Jagera people • social enterprise • Turrabull people • virtual environmentvirtual heritage • virtual heritage environments • virtual historian • Virtual Meanjin • virtual recreationvirtual time machineVirtual Warrane ll

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2014

Songlines: How Indigenous Australians Use Music to Mark Geography

"There are many different methods of pre–literate navigation that have been documented around the world. One of the most unique, a fusion of navigation and oral mythological storytelling, originated among the indigenous peoples of Australia, who navigated their way across the land using paths called songlines or dreaming tracks. In Aboriginal mythology, a songline is a myth based around localised 'creator–beings' during the Dreaming, the indigenous Australian embodiment of the creation of the Earth. Each songline explains the route followed by the creator–being during the course of the myth. The path of each creator–being is marked in sung lyrics. One navigates across the land by repeating the words of the song or re–enacting the story through dance, which in the course of telling the story also describe the location of various landmarks on the landscape (e.g. rock formations, watering holes, rivers, trees). In some cases, the paths of the creator–beings are said to be evident from their marks on the land (petrosomatoglyphs), such as large depressions in the land which are said to be their footprints (parallels can certainly be seen in some North American First Nation creation stories).

Songlines often came in sequences, much like a symphony or album today. By singing a song cycle in the appropriate order could navigate vast distances, often travelling through the deserts of Australia's interior (a fact which amazed early anthropologists who were stunned by Aborigines that frequently walked across hundreds of kilometres of desert picking out tiny features along the way without error). Each group had its own set of songlines that were passed from generation to generation so that future generations would know how to navigate when in neighbouring tribes' territories. The extensive system of songlines in Australia varied in length from a few kilometres to hundreds of kilometres in length crossing through lands of many different Indigenous peoples. Since a songline can span the lands of several different language groups, different parts of some songlines were in different languages corresponding to the region the songline was navigating through at the time, and thus could only be fully understood by a person speaking all of the languages in the song."

(The Basement Geographer, 21 October 2010)

Fig.1 "What are song lines?" Colin Jones, lecturer in Aboriginal History, talks about his culture, his history and his art. Queensland Rural Medical Education.

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Aboriginal mythologyancestral beings • ancestral heroes • animist belief systemAustralia • Colin Jones • creation narrative • creation spirits • Creator Beingscultural memory • cultural webs of memory • dreaming (spirituality) • dreaming tracks • earth motherFirst AustraliansFirst Nations • genii loci • geographical point • Indigenous Australians • kin-grouping system • kinship • landmarkslandscapelocationmappingmarkers • mythological storytelling • navigation systemnavigational methodsoral historiesorientationorigin myth • paths • petrosomatoglyph • place • point-to-point • pre-literate navigation • pre-literate societiessequences and spatial practisessmooth space • song cycle • songlinesspatial literacyspatial narrativespiritualitysymbolic placeterritorytimeless timetopology • totemic ancestors • voice map • watering holewayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 AUGUST 2013

In Spring One Plants Alone: intimate portrait of a mother and her son

"This is the story of Puhi, an aged Maori woman and Niki, her fully grown but wholly dependent son. The world they occupy is not a world of large events but the rituals of everyday life, traditions and interdependence. 'In Spring One Plants Alone' documents the minutiae of their very enclosed existence. Filmed over a period of one and a half years, it emerges as a rare, haunting and powerful portrayal of their life together. This is the story of their rituals and of their survival. The small and disconnected instances that we encounter form a lone vision of the rifts and the bond between an old woman and her disturbed son."

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16mm1980 • Alun Bollinger • Aotearoa New Zealand • Chris Lancaster • cultural traditionscultural valuesdirect cinemadisableddocumentary filmdocumentary truth • enclosed existence • everyday lifefeature-length documentaryFirst Nations • In Spring One Plants Alone (1980) • Indigenousinterdependenceintimate lives • intimate perspectives • intimate portrait • isolated communities • isolationiwiJack BodyLeon NarbeyMaoriMaori eldersMaori people • Maori woman • minutiae • New Zealand cinema • Niki • personal rituals • personal storyportrait of everyday life • Puhi • Queen Elizabeth II Arts Councilremote communitiessocial realismsocial reality • Stephen Upston • student filmstraditionsVincent Ward

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JULY 2010

Hundred Pacer: a contemporary origin myth of a native Taiwanese superhero

"This is my final project for motion graphic design, which is a Flash animation that depicts an 'origin myth' of the self–created hero, Hundred Pacer.

The name Hundred Pacer derived from a kind of very venomous snake that exists in mountain areas of Taiwan called Hundred Pacer snake, and the protagonist, Hundred Pacer, was an ordinary Paiwanese Indigenous girl until her and her father were killed by the mudslide, and the snake God chooses her to revive in passing down the power...

The story was inspired by the Typhoon Morakot happened in August 2009, which killed nearly 500 people and destroyed half of Taiwan at that time."

(Jonghsiang Kwan, 2010)

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2010animationAustronesian culturescreative practicecultural identitydestructiondevastationdisasterdrawingecologyFirst NationsFlash animationhero • Hundred Pacer • identityIndigenous • Jonghsiang Kwan • MAMA project • native • natural disasterNTUorigin myth • Paiwan • Paiwanese • pilot projectresurrectionsnakesuperheroTaiwanTaiwaneseTaiwanese Aboriginestransformationtyphoon • Typhoon Morakot • visual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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