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Which clippings match 'Gameplay' keyword pg.1 of 2
19 JANUARY 2016

Korean video gamers tend to play collectively (not individually)

"Indigenous video game culture creates a game space that Korean gamers use to construct their digital national identity. To Korean gamers, the concept of a digital Korea represents an imaginary space of Korean community where people play games together. Unlike gamers in the United States and Japan, whose gaming experience tends to be individualized, Korea's indigenous video game culture represents a new form of youth culture that allows young gamers to engage in social interaction through gaming with friends at PC Bangs. In this culture, entertainment happens at the moment when gamers are able to 'shout and play games together.' [29] This experience of social gaming creates a particular taste of gameplay that also leads to further immersion in a gaming narrative particular to most Korean gamers (Ok 2011). It is said that Korea is a mad gaming nation (Ahonen and O'Reilly 2007), and the country has the highest penetration rate for a single online game; 12 million South Koreans have driven a car in the Nexon online game Crazyracing Kartrider (2004). In addition to social gameplay within the Korean community, nation-building sentiments also arise in the context of Korean player-killing, where Korean gamers engage in social gaming on the international servers of an online game. [30] Thomas (2008) describes such gameplay as a cultural location that reflects existing racial tensions between Korean and American gamers. Similarly, political tension also appeared in a game massacre event, when Chinese gamers hacked into a Korean server and sparked mass killing between Chinese and Korean gamers in Legend of Mir II (2001).

On a macro level, gaming as a national pastime can be seen in the rapid spread of e-sports in all aspects of Korean society, and this e-sport culture is an indigenous gaming culture that receives support from the government, media institutions, and passionate gamers. E-sports have become recognized as an international sports phenomenon with their origins in Korea. With their emphasis on professional gamers, they have also become an emerging new media phenomenon, an international spectacle in video games (Jin 2010)."

(Mark J. P. Wolf, p.509)

Wolf, M. J. P. (2015). "Video Games Around the World", The MIT Press.

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TAGS

2015 • Chinese gamer • collective behaviourcollectivism • Crazyracing Kartrider • cultural location • digital national identity • e-sport culture • e-sports • game massacre event • gameplaygames research • gaming experience • gaming narrative • gaming nation • Hye Ryoung Ok • imaginary spacesimmersion • indigenous gaming culture • indigenous video game culture • international sports phenomenon • Jim OReilly • Korean community • Korean gamer • Korean society • LAN gaming • Legend of Mir 2 • Mark Wolf • mass collaboration • mass killing • multiplayer computer games • nation-building • national pastime • new media phenomenon • PC bang • people play games together • play games together • political tension • professional gamer • racial tensions • shared context • social gameplay • social gaming • social interaction • social interaction through gaming • South Korea • Tomi Ahonen • video game culture • youth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2014

A Game Bible is not a Game Design Document

"Some people confuse a game bible with a GDD [game design document]. Don't make this mistake. A show bible is a term taken from television production. The show bible's emphasis is on the rules of the world and the backgrounds and relationships of the characters. This is an important document to create, especially if information about your world and characters is going to be shared with other individuals (like those working on marketing materials such as websites, comic book adaptations, and merchandising) but remember that the game bible has nothing to do with gameplay. That's what the GDD is for. ...

A GDD is first and foremost about gameplay. How the character interacts with the world rather than relates to it; a subtle difference, but an important difference nonetheless. I find bibles important, especially when communicating your game's universe to other interested parties, but it really should be done after you have started to flesh out your GDD. "

(Scott Rogers, pp.72–75, 2010)

Rogers, S. (2010). "Level Up!: The Guide to Great Video Game Design", John Wiley & Sons.

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TAGS

2010adaptationbible (guide) • character relationships • document • game bible • Game Design Document (GDD) • game universe • game worldgameplay • marketing materials • merchandising • rulesshow biblestory worldtelevision production • world of the game • world of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2012

The History of Choose Your Own Adventure Story Fiction

"Choose Your Own Adventure's 'you' centered decision making, and exciting pace, has been cited as an influence in numerous games and media that followed the series. Examples of Choose Your Own Adventure's reference in the gaming world includes Japan's popular Bishoujo video games, which combine narratives with gameplay and mark the beginning of 'the trend in modern gaming toward using technology to allow players control over their stories... taking on characteristics of highly detailed Choose Your Own Adventure novels,' Choose Your Own Adventure is credited with partial responsibility for the heightened popularity of Role Playing Games, including Dungeons and Dragons. Other games which have been referenced as inspired by Choose Your Own Adventure include Mass Effect II which has a narrative–based adaptive difficulty setting where potential gameplay is altered by a player's decision–making early in the game and FormSoft's Adventure Player, a portable memory stick for PlayStation that allows players to build narrative–based games. The Interactive Fiction community has also credited Choose Your Own Adventure as being a major influence of their works."

(Chooseco LLC)

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TAGS

adventure game • Adventure Player (software) • Bishoujo (video games) • childrens bookschoose your own adventure • CYOA • decision makingdungeons and dragons • FromSoftware • game • game books • gameplaygamesinteractive fictioninteractive narrative • interactive stories • Mass Effect II (game) • memory stick • Memory Stick Duo • narrative-based games • novel • play novel • point of viewPSP • reluctant readers • role playingrole playing gamesstorystory-based experiencetheir storiesvideo game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2011

Wolfenstein 3D: Pac-Man intragame

"An intragame is a game within the game, e.g. the Pachinko machine in Duke Nukem 3D [or a Pac–Man level in Wolfenstein 3D]. Since computer games are based on simulator technology that could mix or include any other game in addition to the main game, the main game will be the only one classified."

(Aarseth, Smedstad and Sunnanå, 2003, p.49)

1). Video capture of secret Pac–Man level within Episode 3 of Wolfenstein 3D.

2). Table of Contents for Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, DiGRA and Utrecht University

3). Espen Aarseth, Solveig Marie Smedstad and Lise Sunnanå (2003). 'A multi–dimensional typology of games', in Copier, Marinka; Raessens, Joost, Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, DiGRA and Utrecht University

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TAGS

19923Daction hero • Adrian Carmack • Apogee SoftwareCastle Wolfensteincomputer gamesdigital cultureDiGRADuke Nukem 3Deaster eggEspen Aarsethfirst-person point of viewfirst-person shooterFPS • game genres • game within the game • gameplaygames • id Software • intragame • Lise Sunnana • mise-en-abymeNaziPac-Man • Pachinko • PC gamesreflexivityrun and gunScott Miller • shareware • Solveig Marie Smedstad • tribute • typology of games • video gamevirtual environmentsWolfenstein 3D

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 APRIL 2010

GameCity: Nottingham videogame festival

"GameCity is a lot of things, but most of all it's an ongoing project to find out what a videogame festival could be. Unlike a lot of videogame events, it's not really a place to come and play them – we'd rather do that at home on the sofa. But if you do love videogames, you're going to find lots here to enjoy."

(http://gamecity.org/)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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