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Which clippings match 'Learning Outcomes' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 JULY 2015

Assessment Careers: enhancing learning pathways

"Assessment is often viewed as a series of one-off events. This means that learners do not always benefit from feedback, they lack a sense of progress and self-reliance is not encouraged. This project will reconceptualise assessment from the perspective of an assessment career and use this to transform our institution's assessment processes. Like a working career, an assessment career develops through a series of related events that join up to give a coherent and progressive pathway that is self-directed."

(Gwyneth Hughes, Research Portal, Institute of Education, University of London)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2014

NZ Virtual Professional Learning and Development programme

"The Virtual Professional Learning Development programme (VPLD) provides professional learning through an online Community of Practice (CoP). The VPLD offers flexibility of choice, time and approach, and is designed to fit in with what you are already doing as teachers and/or leaders.

Participants develop their own learning goals around projects that interest them, within a learning inquiry process. The aims are to raise participants' professional knowledge and skills, while also accelerating students' achievement of learning outcomes.

A fundamental aspect of participating in the VPLD is engagement in the VPLD online Community of Practice (CoP). The CoP offers a safe environment in which educators can discuss and challenge alternative points of view about pedagogy and practice, across disciplines and sectors."

(New Zealand Ministry of Education)

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TAGS

alternative points of view • Aotearoa New Zealandcommunity of practiceCoP • CORE Education • disciplinarity sectors • e-learningeducators • enquiry process • Hazel Owen • learning goalslearning outcomes • New Zealand Ministry of Education • pedagogy • personalising professional learning virtually • professional development • professional knowledge and skills • professional learning • student achievement • Te Kete Ipurangi • Te Tahuhu o te Matauranga • teachingteaching practice • Virtual PLD programme • Virtual Professional Learning Development programme (VPLD) • VPLD

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

Animated Presentation Describing Grade-Based Assessment at NTU

"For the 2012 / 13 academic year, NTU is introducing a new scheme for assessing undergraduate students' work. The scheme is known as grade–based assessment or GBA.

A major advantage of GBA is that it ensures that there is a direct link between the expected learning outcomes of the part of the course being assessed and what you, the student, have demonstrated in the assessment. This short video explains this.

The specific arrangements relating to the assessment of a module will be set out in module documentation. Previously, assessed work was awarded a mark, usually a percentage. Following the introduction of GBA, each piece of assessed work will be awarded one of 17 grades.

You will be informed about what is expected of you in order to achieve a particular grade. This information will mean that feedback on your work will be clear and you will be able to evaluate your progress towards your final degree classification."

(Nottingham Trent University)

[This animated presentation provides an overview of the grade–based marking scheme which is being introduced at Nottingham Trent University for the 2012 / 13 academic year. The presentation is clearly aimed at NTU students (and refers to the university–specific VLE called the "NOW" – the "NTU Online Workspace"), despite this the clip covers issues which I expect have more general relevance to students studying at other institutions.]

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TAGS

17-point marking scale • 2012academic progressanimated explainer videoanimated presentationassessed workassessmentcourse modules • degree classification • expected learning outcomes • feedbackfeedback and assessment • GBA (assessment) • grade-based assessment • grade-based marking scheme • gradinglearning outcomesNottingham Trent University • NOW (acronym) • NTU • NTU Online Workspace • pedagogy • percentage • performance metricsprogramme modulessummative assessment • summative evaluation • UKundergraduate students

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2012

Trevor Hussey and Patrick Smith: The Uses of Learning Outcomes

"This paper argues that learning outcomes need to be reclaimed from their current use as devices for monitoring and audit, and returned to their proper use in aiding good teaching and learning. We require a broader, flexible and more realistic understanding of learning outcomes, better suited to the realities of the classroom and of practical use to those teachers who wish to respond to the enthusiasm of their students. To this end, a new model is produced that starts from the idea of an articulated curriculum, and embraces both intended and emergent learning outcomes. The model employs the distinction between predicted and unpredicted learning outcomes, together with the distinction between those that are desirable and those that are undesirable. The resulting account is intended to aid understanding of the nature and proper use of learning outcomes in teaching and learning."

(Trevor Hussey & Patrick Smith, p.357, 2003)

Trevor Hussey & Patrick Smith (2003). "The Uses of Learning Outcomes", Teaching in Higher Education, Vol. 8, No. 3, 2003, pp.357–368, ISSN 1356–2517 (print)/ISSN 1470–1294 (online)/03/030357–12, 2003 Taylor & Francis Ltd., DOI: 10.1080/1356251032000088574

TAGS

accountabilityadministriviaaid to understandingambiguityambiguity and uncertainty • articulated curriculum • auditaudit culture • auditing • best practicebureaucracy • constructive alignment • contiguous learning outcomes • corridor of tolerance • curriculum designcurriculum development • David Megginson • desirable outcomes • effective alignment • ELO • emergent curriculum • emergent learning outcomes • enhancing learning • experienced teachers • flexibility • good teaching and learning • higher education • ILO • incidental learning outcomes • indecisiveness • intended learning outcomes • John Biggs • learnerslearning and teaching • learning moments • learning outcomesmonitoring • Patrick Smith • pedagogic recontextualising fieldpedagogypractical usepredictability • predicted learning outcomes • QAA • realistic understanding • realities of the classroom • related learning outcomes • responding to enthusiasm • student enthusiasmstudent learningteachersteaching • Teaching in Higher Education (journal) • Trevor Hussey • uncertainty • unpredicted learning outcomes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2012

Seeking quality in criterion referenced assessment

"Norm and criterion referenced assessment are two distinctly different methods of awarding grades that express quite different values about teaching, learning and student achievement. Norm referenced assessment, or 'grading on the curve' as it is commonly known, places groups of students into predetermined bands of achievements. Students compete for limited numbers of grades within these bands which range between fail and excellence. This form of grading speaks to traditional and rather antiquated notions of 'academic rigour' and 'maintaining standards'. It says very little about the nature or quality of teaching and learning, or the learning outcomes of students. Grading is formulaic and the procedure for calculating a final grade is largely invisible to students.

Criterion referenced assessment has been widely adopted in recent times because it seeks a fairer and more accountable assessment regime than norm referencing. Students are measured against identified standards of achievement rather than being ranked against each other. In criterion referenced assessment the quality of achievement is not dependent on how well others in the cohort have performed, but on how well the individual student has performed as measured against specific criteria and standards. Underlying this grading scheme is a concern for accountability regarding the qualities and achievements of students, transparency and negotiability in the process by which grades are awarded, an acknowledgement of subjectivity and the exercise of professional judgement in marking."

(Lee Dunn, Sharon Parry and Chris Morgan, 2002)

TAGS

2002 • academic rigour • accountabilityassessmentassessment criteria • assessment regime • awarding grades • banding • benchmark • cohort • criteria and standards • criterion • criterion referenced assessment • education • excellence • fail • fairness • grades • grading • grading on the curve • grading schemeinformation in contextlearninglearning outcomes • marking • measurement • negotiability • norm • norm referenced assessment • norm referencing • pedagogy • predetermined bands of achievements • professional judgement • qualities and achievements • quality of achievement • range • ranked • standardisationstandardised testingstandardsstandards of achievementstudent achievementstudent performancestudentssubjectivityteachingteaching and learning • teaching and learning quality • teaching methodstransparency

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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