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Which clippings match '1954' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 JANUARY 2014

Energizing corporate culture through industrial musicals

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1950s1954aesthetic spectacleautomaker • awayday • boom time • business contextChevroletcollective values • company loyalty • corporate Americacorporate behaviourcorporate culturecorporate events • corporate image • corporate musical • economic boomenculturationenergizing corporate cultureentertainmentGeneral Motors • industrial musical • industrial propaganda • industrial show • industrial theatre • internal marketing • internal songbook • marketing practicesmusical theatreorganisational culturePrelinger Archivespromoting shared business contextpropagandasales and profitshow (spectacle) • song-and-dance • team day • team motivation • team-buildingtrade convention

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

California Department of Public Health: The Marlboro Man Recoded

"Brands are about meaning. In this case, Leo Burnett was able to transform a mild woman's cigarette into a rugged masculine product virtually overnight by using iconic imagery. The brand was literally re–imagined and thrust into the number 1 position as a result. The state of California realized that they needed to disempower this same iconic imagery and bluntly point out that even rugged cowboys can suffer serious diseases like lung cancer, emphysema, and heart disease caused by smoking."

(Kurian M. Tharakan)

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19241954advertising campaign • Asher and Partners • brandalism • California Department of Public Health • cancer • cigarette addiction • consumer brandscowboycritical commentaryculture jamming • David McLean • Dick Hammer • disarmamentdiseaseemotive manipulation • emphysema • gendered brandsharmful effects • heart disease • iconic imagery • impotence • Leo Burnett • lung cancer • Marlboro (cigarette) • Marlboro Country • Marlboro Cowboy • masculinityPhilip Morrispublic health campaignre-inscriptionre-purposerecoding • renarrativize • ruggedsmoking causes impotencesmoking cigarettes • smoking related diseases • tobacco industry • Wayne McLaren

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2010

BFI gets Halas & Batchelor animation archive

"the husband and wife–run Halas & Batchelor, sometimes called the British Disney–which for more than 50 years produced adverts, public information pieces, feature films, TV cartoons and serious award–winning animation respected the world over.

Today, 15 years after the studio's last release, the British Film Institute will announce that it has been given the Halas & Batchelor archive, including film prints, stills, scripts, correspondence and original cells. It is the largest ever single donation of British animation and was welcomed as 'an extraordinarily rich gift' by the BFI director, Amanda Nevill. 'We look forward to working on ensuring these films and artefacts are enjoyed by the widest possible group of people in years to come,' she said. ...

Curator Jez Stewart hopes that the BFI will be now be able to open up Halas & Batchelor to new generations of animation fans and practitioners. Aardman Animation's Nick Park said he had fond memories of watching the company's animated educational films at school. 'They have always been part of my life,' he said. 'John Halas was the judge on the first animated competition I ever entered–I didn't win, but admired him and looked up to him as a great figure in British animation.'"

(Mark Brown, 3 December 2010, The Guardian)

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19401954advertadvertising • Amanda Nevill • Animal Farm (1954)animationart historyartefactBFIBritainBritish animationBritish Film Institutecartooncollectioncommercial • Corn Flakes • donationfeature filmfilm • film print • Halas and BatchelorheritagehistoryJohn HalasJoy BatchelorKelloggsLondon • pioneers • political allegorypublic informationpublic information filmscript • stills • studioTVVivien HalasWalt Disney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JULY 2009

Jimmy Forsyth: Photographer who chronicled vanishing community life in the UK north-east

"The Tyneside amateur photographer Jimmy Forsyth, who has died aged 95, produced an acclaimed portrait of industrial working–class life in Britain.
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in the early 1950s he heard rumours of plans to demolish Elswick and Scotswood Road. A whole way of life was under threat, and Jimmy imagined that he could capture the spirit of the community through photography. Thus he began in 1954, with a second–hand box camera and no formal training, his epic project to produce a portrait of the area by a trusted insider.

Mindful of posterity, he took a systematic approach – his images are indexed and his subjects carefully identified. Crucially, the task also saved Jimmy from unemployment. He assembled the prints, processed by Boots or a local chemist, in tartan–covered albums, and including the price of the films, his photography probably consumed a considerable part of his £2–a–week National Assistance money. Often he would sell people their prints for half a crown to fund the next roll of film. In an effort to improve his finances, Jimmy opened a shop in 1956 in Pine Street, but his generosity in providing goods 'on tick' soon forced him to sell up.

When the bulldozers eventually came to Elswick in the late 1950s, they inspired a period of intense activity for Jimmy, who stayed until the last moment to document the painful process of demolition. He even photographed the demolition men and the families left behind, until, he said, there was a knock at 356 Scotswood Road, where he was living: 'You'd better move out. We're doing this block next.'"
(The Guardian, 16 July 2009)

[Jimmy Forsyth, 1957. Scotswood Teddy Boys]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 2004

Sutherland's notoriously disliked painting of Winston Churchill

"Sutherland was commissioned by both Houses of Parliament to paint a full–length portrait of Churchill in 1954, for which this is a study. The finished painting was presented to Churchill. It was destroyed by his wife Clementine.

...The destruction of Sutherland's painting is one of the most notorious cases of a subject disliking their portrait. This painted sketch of Churchill's head, a study for the lost, full–length painting, suggests why. It's not simply that Sutherland's modernist tendencies irked the conservative tastes of the Sunday painter prime minister. This is a very unhappy painting. Old, grumpy, with an anger that no longer seems leavened by the humour and verbal creativity of the Churchill of legend, this is a reactionary curmudgeon surrounded by the shades of night.

The painting is black and rough, as if burnt, as if Churchill were emerging from the ruins of Europe, from a world not saved but shattered. The man himself still has a stoic authority; he might be the ancient Roman Cicero waiting to be murdered. There's a sculpted quality to his sturdy bald head that reminds you of Roman busts. There's also a sadness and sense of defeat, rather than the assertion of indomitability in the Churchill statue outside the Houses of Parliament. This is a man alone, in the real wilderness years."

(Jonathan Jones, 3 November 2001, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Winston Churchill, by Graham Vivian Sutherland, pencil and wash, circa 1954, 22 1/2 in. x 17 3/8 in. (570 mm x 440 mm), Purchased, 1990, NPG 6096, National Portrait Gallery, London.
Fig.2 Churchill in 1954 – portrait by Graham Sutherland (imperfect reproduction).

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1874 • 1954196520th century • also-ran • Boer warBritish art • Clementine Churchill • cold warcommissionconservativedestruction • dwindling health • emerging from the ruins • extraordinary achievements • figuration • finest hour • Francis Bacon • Graham Sutherland • home secretary • Houses of Parliament • indomitability • iron curtain • legendliberal • man alone • National Portrait Gallery • neo-romantic painter • Nobel Prizenotorious • painted sketch • paintingpopularityportraitportraiturePrime Minister • reactionary curmudgeon • Roman Cicero • romanticismsadnessSecond World War • sense of defeat • shattered • Sir Winston Spencer Churchill • stoic • striking miners • sunday painter • The Guardian • The Second World War • warwar correspondent • war leader • wartime prime minister • wilderness years • Winston ChurchillWorld War II
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