Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Media Literacy' keyword pg.1 of 2
05 AUGUST 2012

Teach and Learn Online: Die LMS die! You too PLE!

"The PLE project recognises the fundamental flaws in Virtual Learning Environments or Learning Management Systems (VLE, LMS), but falls short in its vision of an alternative. At this stage in the project it is suggesting that the PLE be a desktop application for a student (sounds a bit like my old Perfect LMS idea) or a singular portal online.

At risk of sounding like a broken record, I'll have to repeat my defining question about Internet enhanced learning, but this time in response to the PLE.

Question to the PLE: Why do we need a PLE when we already have the Internet? The Internet is my PLE, ePortfolio, VLE what ever. Thanks to blogger, bloglines, flickr, delicious, wikispaces, ourmedia, creative commons, and what ever comes next in this new Internet age, I have a strong online ID and very extensive and personalised learning environment. Actually I think the PLE idea is better envisioned by the futurist concept known as the Evolving Personalised Information Construct (EPIC). I think we already have EPIC, so why do we need the PLE?

To extend the statement: We insignificant little teachers and our out of date schools and classrooms don't need to be investing in media projects like VLEs, LMS and even PLEs. Our dam walls of knowledge have burst! and no amount of sand bagging will stop the flood that is clearly discrediting our authority over learning. Media, and with it communications, will evolve (as it certainly has in the last 50 years or more) well beyond the limitations of our classrooms, with investments and broadcast influence we can't even fathom. Why waste our precious money and time on projects that only serve to suspend our true position within that media scape. The PLE makes me think of ELGG, and it all makes me wonder why it is we educationalists still think we are even relevant anymore. The people (yes that includes us) are learning how to read and write for themselves, and in an amazing act of collective generosity, the people are teaching each other – why do they even need our classrooms... is it perhaps only credentialism that we offer? Or is it also sense of security and safety? Is it false?"

(Leigh Blackall, 13 November 2005)

Fig.1 "Lords of Graphite" by 5star (Neil Caldwell).

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TAGS

2005authorised voiceBlogger (software) • Bloglines • broadcast societycentralised platformclassrooms • collective generosity • Creative CommonscredentialismDeliciousdesktop application • desktop classroom • e-portfolio • educationalists • ELGG • EPIC (acronym) • ePortfolio • Evolving Personalised Information Construct • Flickrgift cultureinformation literacy • internet enhanced learning • learning and teaching • learning centre • Learning Management System • learning media • learning platform • learning portal • Leigh Blackall • LMSmedia literacymediascape • network literate • new Internet age • online portal • open Internet • Ourmedia • out of date • personalised learning environment • pervasive mediaPLEschools • singular portal online • virtual learning environmentsVLEWikispaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JULY 2012

Slacktory: the only blog on the internet (this seems legit)

"Born July 2011, Slacktory is a comedic blog about the pop culture of the internet. Editor Nick Douglas, sous–editor Henry Birdseye and a team of talented freelance contributors analyze, abuse and satirize the rest of the net.

Slacktory is a part of My Damn Channel and the My Damn Channel Blog Network."

(Nick Douglas)

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2011 • comedic blog • digital culture • freelance contributors • freelance writer • Henry Birdseye • humourInternetmedia literacy • My Damn Channel • My Damn Channel Blog Network • Nick Douglas • parodypop-culturesatire • Slacktory • Slacktory (blog) • the net

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Peggy Orenstein on our gender performance culture

"Peggy Orenstein ('Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie–Girl Culture') and Kaveri Subrahmanyam ('Digital Youth: The Role of Media in Development') had a conversation about girl culture and digital media for Googlers in Santa Monica on February 9, 2011. They were joined by Adriana Manago, who works with Kaveri at the Children's Digital Media Center (UCLA/CSULA)."
(About @Google Talks, 9 February 2011)

Fig.1 Kaveri Subrahmanyam talks to Peggy Orenstein about "Cinderella Ate My Daughter", About @Google Talks [18:24]

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TAGS

Adriana Manago • Barbie Fashion Designer • boredomboys • bullying • chat roomCinderella • Cinderella Ate My Daughter • culture of prettydesiredigital mediadigital youthdoll playempowermentFacebookfeminismgendergender performance culture • girlhood • girlsGoogle Inc • Google Talks • identity • identity development • Kaveri Subrahmanyam • Lord and Taylor • market segmentationmedia literacy • media researcher • new medianew technology • nursery colours • overcoding • parent • Peggy Orenstein • performance cultureperformativitypinkpink and prettyplaying with dolls • popular zeitgeist • pornographyprettysextingsexual agencysexualisationsexualitysocial mediasocialisation • Tyler Clementi • young girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2011

Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing

"Of course, other kinds of assignments involving visuals do occur in college writing pedagogies. Visual analysis (especially advertising analysis) has been commonplace in postsecondary writing instruction for at least fifty years as a part of the post–World War II emphasis on propaganda and semantics characteristic of many composition and communication courses beginning in the 1940s, but that practice did not always or consistently include careful consideration of how images, layout, or graphics actually communicated meaning. Instead, advertising was treated as a subject for critique rather than itself a form of communication that employed both word and image" (Diana George, 2002, p.21).

"If I have given the impression that the media revolution of the fifties and sixties was a tough one for [writing] composition teachers, then I must say here that the world of graphic design, electronic text, and Web technologies certainly will prove even more difficult, though ultimately perhaps more useful for future understandings of composition as design. As with written compositions, Web pages must have an internal coherence; they must, in other words, be navigable. Unlike written compositions, the internal logic of a Web piece is likely to appear first in the visual construction of the page – not only in the images chosen but the colors, the placement of text or links, the font, the use of white space, and other elements linked more closely to the world of graphic design than to composition pedagogy. The work of Anne Wysocki is useful here as she challenges writing teachers to rethink their notions of what composition means – beyond the word and inclusive of the visual. Wysocki writes, 'When we ask people in our classes to write for the Web we enlarge what we mean by composition. None of us are unaware of the visuality of the Web, of how that initial default, neutral grey has a different blankness than typing–paper' ('Monitoring Order'). And whether it is true or not that their teachers are aware of the difference between the blank screen and the blank page, our students are certainly aware of this difference. Many already compose for the Web. Many have worked in the realm of the visual (or the virtual) as constitutive of composing texts of all sorts years before they get to their first–year college courses."

(Diana George, 2002, p.26,27)

Fig.1 Photography: She is Frank, Styling: Tessa O'Connor, Hair/Makeup: Megan Harrison, Model: Bree Unthank @ Giant Model Management [http://wearehandsome.com/a–handsome–project–she–is–frank/]

2). Diana George. "From Analysis to Design: Visual Communication in the Teaching of Writing," College Composition and Communication 54.1 (2002): 11–39.

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TAGS

2002academic writingadvertisingadvertising analysis • Anthony Petrosky • Christine McQuade • communication and composition • complex communication • composing texts • composition as design • composition pedagogy • content analysis • D. G. Kehl • David Bartholomae • Dean Johnson • Deirdre Johns • Delmar George Kehl • Diana George • Donald McQuade • electronic text • Englishes • George Lyman Kittredge • graphic designgraphic representation • Houghton Mifflin • image analysis • image as dumbed-down language • image-as-prompt • image-rich culture • internal coherence • internal logic • James McCrimmon • John Berger • John Hays Gardiner • John Trimbur • Joseph Frank • Lucille Schultz • mass media • materiality of literacy • media literacymulti-modal design • multiliteracies • multiliteracy • multimodal composition • navigable • Neil Postman • New London Group • pedagogypictorial systemspopular culture • Robert Connors • Rudolph Flesch • Sarah Louise Arnold • teaching of writing • technologysaturated • televisiontextual analysis • verbal and visual relationships • verbal communication • visual communicationvisual construction • visual construction of the page • visual designvisual languagevisual literacy • visuality of the web • Walker Gibson • web technologies • William Costanzo • William Hogarth • writing • writing composition • writing for the web • writing teachers • written compositions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2011

American Conservatory Theater's No Exit: blurs the lines between film and theatre

"Fresh from sold–out performances across Canada, Jean–Paul Sartre's redefined classic makes its U.S. debut at A.C.T. A mysterious valet ushers three people into a shabby hotel room, and they soon discover that hell isn't fire and brimstone at all –it's other people. Sartre's existential classic, skillfully reimagined through the perspective of a series of hidden cameras, turns the stage into a cinema, and the audience into voyeurs, as a thrillingly staged 'live film' takes place before your eyes. A.C.T. continues its tradition of welcoming the work of innovative international artists to the Bay Area with this riveting multimedia event."

(American Conservatory Theater, 2011)

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TAGS

2011 • American Conservatory Theater • audience • Bay Area • Canadacreative practiceexistentialexistentialismexperimental theatrehell • hidden cameras • hotel room • Jean-Paul Sartre • live film • living picturesmedia literacymultidisciplinarymultimedia • multimedia event • No Exit (1944)proscenium archradical stagingreimaginedstagesurveillancetheatre • valet • visual literacy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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