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16 NOVEMBER 2012

Thomas Allen: whimsical pulp fiction cut-outs

"Playing the role of scientist, [Thomas] Allen enlists mid 20th–century books on the natural phenomenon of science(astronomy, physics, electricity, biology) and presents his research as if through the eyes of his 8–year old daughter. How would she understand and portray these theories and absolutes of science?

Allen's signature use of cutting and repurposing book illustrations has not vanished. Instead of the pulp fiction genre, Allen plays with 50's era versions of clean cut youths and domesticated moms. His unmistakable talent for creating the illusion of 3D in photography with his deft cuts and crimps, establishes a magical world in which a boy and girl play tag creating their own kind of electricity, a milkman makes a very special delivery in space, young toughs play marbles with the solar system and a mother busily sews her own version of 'string theory.'"

(Foley Gallery, 2012, New York NY)

Fig.1 Bearings, 2012. Fig.2 Eclipsed, 2012.

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1950s201220th century2Dartistastronomybiologybookbook illustrations • clean cut • compositioncut-out • cut-out characters • cut-out illustration • cuts and crimps • design craftdomesticatedelectricityexhibition • Foley Gallery • gallerymagical worldmid 20th-century • natural phenomenon • physicspop-uppulp fictionrepurposingsciencescientific illustrationshallow depth of field • theories and absolutes of science • Thomas Allen • through the eyes • vintage books • whimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2012

The Space: Building a Broadcaster in a Box

"Back in August last year, Tony Ageh asked us a question: 'How would you deliver a 'pop–up' television channel to desktops, mobiles, tablets and connected TVs?'

The typical response, particularly within the BBC, would be a suggestion to re–purpose much of the infrastructure we already have: media ingest, metadata management, transcoding, web publication, device targeting.

There was a snag, though. In fact, there were a couple. First, this wasn't just a pop–up TV channel – this was a 'broadcaster in a box', which could later be handed over to arts organisations to pick up and run with."

(Mo McRoberts, 1 May 2012, BBC)

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2011arts advocacyarts and cultureArts Council Englandarts organisationsBBC • broadcaster in a box • connected TV • desktops • device targeting • Digital Public Space • infrastructure • media channel • media distribution • media infrastructure • media ingest • media publishing • metadata management • mobiles • pick up and run with • pop-up • pop-up television channel • pop-up TV channel • re-purpose infrastructuretabletstelevision channel • The Space • The Space (service) • Tony Ageh • transcodingUKvisual arts • web publication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2012

Pop-up art transform Christchurch earthquake barriers

"Bryan L'Estrange has been chosen to curate an art exhibition in Sumner on canvases stretched across the container fronts. They will be installed at Sumners' Peacock's Gallop stretch of Containers. In some cases the containers are 12 metres long. ..

Dinesh Patel is the designer, Bryan LEstrange is curator. They are taking submissions from artists and looking for sponsors now. Some of the artists already confirmed include Ben Reid, Tony Delautour and Kees Bruin as well as Simon Kaan, Tony Cribb and Jason Kelly."

(L'Estrange Art Gallery, 06 September 2011, The Big Idea)

[The shipping containers were put in place as barriers to prevent injury by falling rocks, after the September 2010 earthquake in the seaside Christchurch suburb of Sumner in Aotearoa New Zealand.]

Fig.1 Bryan L'Estrange (2011), "Container exhibition Sumner Christchurch".

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2011Aotearoa New Zealandartart exhibitionart galleryartistsartworkbarrier • Ben Reid • Bryan LEstrange • Christchurch • Christchurch artists • community • container • containers • curator • Dinesh Patel • earthquake • earthquake barriers • exhibitionexhibition spacehoardings • humanisation • Jason Kelly • Kees Bruin • large format printing • local presence • open-air art gallery • Peacocks Gallop • platform for artists • pop-up • pop-up art • pop-up gallery • reinscribe • shipping container • shipping containers • Simon Kaan • South Island • Sumner • temporary • temporary art • The Big Idea • Tony Cribb • Tony Delautour • ugly • urban landscape

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JULY 2011

The pop-up shop phenomenon

"Pop–ups are the epitome of our high–speed, short–attention–span culture. They are restaurants, bars, clubs and shops that spring up in unexpected locations, cause a storm, and disappear just before the fashion crowd moves on to the next big thing. Comme des Garçons started the trend in 2004 with its guerrilla stores. Now London is totally pop–up–tastic. Following the success of the Reindeer restaurant, the Bistrotheque boys have now decamped (actually and aesthetically) from Bethnal Green to Burlington Gardens. Flash, their grown–up restaurant in the Royal Academy, will be over in just that. Tyler Brûlé has turned shopgirl in his design–led roving microstore for Monocle magazine. Blink and you'd have missed Mary Portas's hyper–pop–up: open for just one hour to sell vintage clothes in Bishopsgate earlier this month. Then there's the Foundry, flogging quirky homewares in different spaces around the capital; Atelier Moët on Bond Street, where you can customise champagne bottles (although its last day is today); and the Proud Gallery, which started off as merely a marquee over a car park.

It's a perfect concept for our hype–heavy society. Nowhere can be the hottest place to be seen in for more than six months, so by pulling it down and starting again, businesses can be constantly reinvented. Because they are temporary, pop–ups can take risks. They don't need as much polish, so they don't need as much investment – perfect for recessionistas."

(Damian Barr, 28 December 2008, Times Online)

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2004 • Atelier Moet • bars • Bethnal Green • Bishopsgate • Bistrotheque boys • Bond Street • Burlington Gardens • clubs • constantly reinvented • consumerismeconomic recessionentrepreneurship • fashion crowd • flash retailing • global financial crisis • guerrilla stores • high-speed • hype-heavy society • hyper-pop-up • locationLondon • marquee • Mary Portas • Monocle magazine • next big thing • opportunismphenomenon • place to be seen • pop-uppop-up retailpop-up shop • pop-up store • pop-up-tastic • pop-ups • Proud Gallery • recessionistas • Reindeer restaurant • reinvent • restaurants • retailrisk-taking • Royal Academy • shop • shopgirl • short-attention-span culture • spaces • spring up • temporary • the Foundry • Tyler Brule • unexpected • vintage clothes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JULY 2009

Thomas Allen: pulp fiction remixes

"[Thomas] Allen's photographs are inspired by his childhood experiences with pop–up books and View–Masters. He begins his process by cutting figures and images out of illustrated pages of old books and vintage fiction novels. Allen then cleverly rearranges and juxtaposes the forms to create three–dimensional scenes. Next, he carefully lights his subjects and photographs the scenes.

When separated from their original stories, the figures take on fresh roles in entirely new situations. Yet they retain their intended purpose of storytelling. Characters and objects originally created as two–dimensional illustrations are raised from their pages and given new life in three–dimensional space. The figures return back to two–dimensional objects, this time in the form of a photograph."
(Joseph Bellows Gallery)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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