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Which clippings match 'Wellbeing' keyword pg.1 of 2
16 DECEMBER 2014

Breathing Friend: stress relief ball by Czech industrial design student

Diploma Work created by industrial design student Kateřina Pražáková at the Czech Technical University, Prague in 2014.

"Tento malý přítel je určen jako dárek pro ženy trpící stresem. Může se pro nás stát blízkým tak jako hračka v dětství či pouze nástrojem, který nás nenásilnou formou dokáže uklidnit. Povrch si každý může vytvořit sám podle svých sympatií a tím se stává osobnější. Při uchopení tohoto křehkého dýchajícího stvoření můžeme příjemně relaxovat a na chvíli zapomenout na chaos kolem nás. Díky svojí velikosti jej můžeme mít stále u sebe."

And as translated from Czech to English using Google Translate: "This little friend is designated as gift for women suffering from stress. It may become for us so close like a toy in childhood or just tool that nonviolent us form can soothe. Surface everyone can create by himself their sympathy and becomes personal. In this gripping brittle breathing creature we can relax and moment, forget the chaos around us."

(Kateřina Pražáková, 2014)

[The project set out to address the problem of everyday stress through creating a stress relief ball called Breathing Friend. In doing so various materials were considered because of their significance for the target user group. The project has an anthropomorphistic aspect through its use of subtle vibration and physical warmth.]

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TAGS

2014animal resemblancesanthropomorphismanxietyArduinobioelectronics • Breathing Friend (project) • calming effect • chestnut • Czech Republic • Czech Technical University in Prague • design process • embryo • emotional involvementergonomic designhaptic interface • hemisphere • industrial design • Katerina Prazakova • lifelikemechanical animal • mechanical creature • Miroslav Macik • motherhoodnatural materials • neurohumoral response • palm • pebble • polyurethane foam • product design • psychological distress • psychological perception • purring • selection of materials • siliconesimulation • soothing • stress • stress ball • stress relief • student projectsubstratestoytraumavisceral • wadding • wellbeingwool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JULY 2014

Australian anti-discrimination campaign: Stop. Think. Respect.

"beyondblue's new national anti–discrimination campaign highlights the impact of racism on the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Research shows that subtle or 'casual' racism can be just as harmful as more overt forms. Imagine being judged in a job interview by the colour of your skin, rather than the strength of your CV. How would you feel if you were watched in a shop or treated differently on public transport?

Why should anyone be made to feel like crap, just for being who they are?

Stop. Think. Respect. encourages everyone in Australia to check their behaviour. Stop the discrimination, think about how your comments or actions could cause real distress and harm, and respect people who are different from you."

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2014Aboriginalad campaign • anti-discrimination • anxiety • attempted suicide • attitudesAustraliaawareness campaignawareness raisingbehaviour • Beyond Blue • casual discriminationcasual racismdepressiondiscriminationeveryday racism • footie • harmful effectsIndigenous Australiansmental healthmental wellbeing • passive racism • perceived threat • prejudiceracial discriminationracial inequality • racial injustice • racismrespectskin coloursubstance abuse • substance use • subtle racism • Torres Strait Islanderwellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MAY 2014

Digital Health: emerging healthcare practices through digital convergence

"Digital health is the convergence of the digital and genetics revolutions with health and healthcare. As we are seeing and experiencing, digital health is empowering us to better track, manage, and improve our own and our family's health. It's also helping to reduce inefficiencies in healthcare delivery, improve access, reduce costs, increase quality, and make medicine more personalized and precise. ...

The essential elements of the digital health revolution include wireless devices, hardware sensors and software sensing technologies, microprocessors and integrated circuits, the Internet, social networking, mobile and body area networks, health information technology, genomics, and personal genetic information.

The lexicon of Digital Health is extensive and includes all or elements of mHealth (aka Mobile Health), Wireless Health, Health 2.0, eHealth, Health IT, Big Data, Health Data, Cloud Computing, e–Patients, Quantified Self and Self–tracking, Wearable Computing, Gamification, Telehealth & Telemedicine, Precision and Personalized Medicine, plus Connected Health."

(Paul Sonnier, Story of Digital Health)

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big data • Body Area Network (BAN) • cloud computing • connected devices • connected health • digital convergence • digital genetics • digital healthdigital health solution • e-Patients • eHealth • emerging healthcare practices • emerging practices • ePatients • gamificationgamifyinggeneticsgenomics • hardware sensors • health 2.0 • health data • health IT • healthcare delivery • mHealthmobile health • nuviun • patient information • personal genetic information • Personal Health Information (PHI) • personalised healthcare • personalised medicine • precision medicine • quantified self • self-monitoring • self-tracking • social networking • software sensing technologies • superconvergence • technology convergence • telehealth • telemedicine • wearable computingwellbeing • wireless health

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 DECEMBER 2013

Imperial College London: Personalised Healthcare

"Many pharmaceuticals have idiosyncratic action when administered. The concept that healthcare solutions can be tailored to the individual is one that is attractive as it potentially allows a better match of patient and drug.

Identifying signatures indicative of treatment outcome are key to personalising medicine. Top–down systems biology offers an opportunity to help predict drug efficiacy and avoid adverse reactions.

Providing optimised healthcare on an individual basis will benefit both patients and clinicians through improved drug choice, efficacy and reduced costs. From the work we have conducted using large scales molecular epidemiology studies using metabolic phenotyping, it is clearer than ever before that a one–size–fits–all solution to drug therapy is not a sustainable or desirable model. Given the diversity of human biochemistry, such phenotypes are important in personalising medicine as they provide clues as to the influences of a variety of factors including underlying genetics, environmental stress, nutritional status and gut microbial activity."

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biological diversityclinical medicine • Computational and Systems Medicine (CSM) • digital health • drug choice • drug efficiacy • drug therapy • environmental stress • epidemiology • evidence-based healthcare • gene signature • genetic signatures of diseases • gut microbial activity • healthcare research • healthcare solutions • human biochemistry • human health • idiosyncrasies • idiosyncratic action • individualised healthcare • interdisciplinary research • metabolic phenotyping • molecular epidemiology • molecular epidemiology studies • nutritional status • one-size-fits-all solution • optimised healthcare • patient carepersonalised healthcare • personalising medicine • pharmaceutical drugs • pharmaceuticals • phenotypes • primary healthcare research • scientific research • systems biology approaches • translational medicine • translational science • underlying genetics • wellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2013

The role of 'the work' in research

"This is sometimes another stumbling block, particularly to the Romantic notion of the practitioner whose aim is the expression of the self. We need to differentiate between activities that are to do with the personal development of the practitioner and his or her creativity, and activities that are significant for others in the field. It is only an activity that is significant for others that can be regarded as research. Personal development does not make a contribution to the 'advancement of knowledge, understanding and insight', except in the most parochial sense, i.e. my advancement. To illustrate this let us consider the discipline of arts therapies. It is the purpose of arts therapies to improve the well–being of the client through an intervention involving the client doing some kind of arts activity such as painting, music or drama, etc. Whether the client produces art, in the sense of 'a work of art' mentioned above, is irrelevant to the process. The activity is aimed at the personal development and self knowledge of the individual and not at the advancement of knowledge, understanding and insight into some issue shared by others. Of course, the client's case may contribute to the advancement of knowledge in arts therapies, but this would be an outcome for the therapist and not for the client. In addition, the client's productions may subsequently achieve the status of 'works' but this would be incidental to their original function in connection with improved well–being. Thus I would distinguish between (1) art as therapy (for the individual), (2) art as cultural practice (the production of works of art), and (3) art as research (meeting certain criteria under discussion). It is my claim that (1) and (3), that is, art as therapy and art as research, are mutually exclusive. I should emphasise that this does not mean that I deny that there is such a discipline as arts therapies research!"

(Michael A. R. Biggs, 2003, Practice as Research in Performance)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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