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20 JANUARY 2014

What industry say fusion skills really are?

Friday 31st January 2014 at the London Knowledge Lab: Presentations 1:30–2:30; Demos 2:30–3:30; Discussion and debate: 3:30–4:30.

"Digital media is now ubiquitous and embedded all around us even when we are not connected via our range of devices, so its no surprise that the government sees the creative industries as a priority area for growth. One factor key to its success is that of the so–called 'Fusion Skills': mixes of creative media, STEM and enterprise. The fusion of these three elements is an increasing demand from industry voices and seen as an answer to new digital innovation. In 2012, The Creative Industries Council (that reports to two ministers of state) called Fusion 'the new skills imperative' and one of eight challenges that need to be addressed in order to unlock growth. This 'what the research says' event attempts to unpack and explore Fusion in theory and practice, hearing from industry and educators. It's said that Higher Education faculty and discipline silos necessitate against fusion learning and teaching. ...

How do we co–opt students who are resistant to such abstract ideas, preferring outdated career caricatures from sources of variable quality? Where should interventions be– secondary school? Postgraduate? Is there hard evidence that Fusion skills are needed?"

(London Knowledge Lab)

TAGS

2014arts and humanities • career charicatures • computer sciencecreative economycreative industries • Creative Industries Council • creative media • creative problem solving skills • current thinking • digital mediadigital technology • disciplinary silos • embeddedenterpriseenterprise and creativity • Fusion Challenge • fusion skill • fusion skills • industry voices • interdisciplinary approacheslearning and teaching • Learning Innovation Education • LKL Innovations • LondonLondon Knowledge LabNESTA • new digital innovation • priority area for growth • Saint John Walker • silosSTEM subjects • the new skills imperative • theory and practice • TransFusion Conference • ubiquitousUK • unlock growth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2013

The Value of Culture: Two Cultures

"Melvyn Bragg considers the 150–year history of the Two Cultures debate. In 1959 the novelist C.P. Snow delivered a lecture in Cambridge suggesting that intellectual life had become divided into two separate cultures: the arts and the humanities. The lecture is still celebrated for the furore it provoked – but Snow was returning to a battleground almost a century old. Melvyn Bragg visits the old Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, scene of many of modern science's greatest triumphs, to put the Two Cultures debate in its historical context – and Paul Nurse, President of the Royal Society, reveals the influence the Two Cultures debate had on his development as a scientist."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2013)

"The Value of Culture: Two Cultures", Radio broadcast, Episode 3 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Wednesday 02 January 2013, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

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TAGS

1959 • all matters which most concern us • American education • American schools • artistic intellectuals • arts and humanitiesarts education • British education • C P Snow • Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge • Charles Percy Snow • civilisationClassicalclassicscommerce • cultural agenda • cultural high ground • cultureCulture and Anarchydisciplinary protectionism • editorial control • education system • elites • experimental teachingF R Leavis • free thought • German education • German schools • GreekH G Wellshabitshigh culture • illiteracy of scientists • intellectual life • John Tyndall • knowledgeLatin • literary intellectuals • manufacturingmaterialismMatthew ArnoldMelvyn Braggmodern sciencemodern society • Paul Nurse • quality of education • Rede Lecture • reliable official knowledge • Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts Manufactures and Commerce • RSA • schoolingsciencesciences and humanitiesscientific age • scientific culture • scientific education • scientific naturalism • scientific revolution • scientific teaching • scientists • Second Law of Thermodynamics • shared languagesocial class • speaking the same language • stock notions • study of perfection • technological culture • technology • the best which has been thought and said in the world • the classics • The Value of Culture (radio) • Thomas Huxley • traditional culturetwin pillarstwo cultures • Two Cultures debate • two separate cultures

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2012

Storyville: Exploring narratives of learning and teaching, the 2nd annual HEA Arts and Humanities conference, 2013

Date: 29 May 2013 – 30 May 2013

Location/venue: Thistle Brighton, King's Road, Brighton, England, BN1 2GS

The Higher Education Academy's second annual learning and teaching Arts and Humanities conference, 'Storyville: Exploring narratives of learning and teaching' will take place on 29–30 May 2013 in Brighton.

"At the heart of the Arts and Humanities disciplines sit stories–stories which create and recreate worlds, distant and present, stories which inspire and engage, stories which grow imaginations and expand what is thinkable.

Stories are everywhere, and our second annual conference seeks to explore the intersections between narrative and learning and teaching..."

(Higher Education Academy, UK)

TAGS

2013academic identitiesanthologyarchivearts and humanities • assessing creatively • conference • create and recreate worlds • creating stories • curricula designdesigning learning experiencesdisciplinary boundarieseducator • experimental forms • gamifyinggamifying learning and teachingHannah ArendtHEHEAHigher Education Academy • how students learn • how we teach • inspire and engage • Key Information Set (KIS)learning and teachinglearning storiesliterary devicesmetaphormetaphorical representationnaming processnarrative account • narrative and learning • narrative co-creation • narrative framingnarratives of discovery • narratives we teach by • National Student Survey • our stories • pedagogypractice narrativesrehearsal • research-based teaching • sharing stories • social presence • stories • storyville • student journey • students as partners • teaching and learning • teaching methodologies • teaching-based research • telling storiestravelogue • tweeting • tweetsUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2012

Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media

"Since 1994 under the founding direction of Roy Rosenzweig, the Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University has used digital media and computer technology to democratize history – to incorporate multiple voices, reach diverse audiences, and encourage popular participation in presenting and preserving the past.

CHNM uses digital media and technology to preserve and present history online, transform scholarship across the humanities, and advance historical education and understanding. Each year CHNM's many project websites receive over 20 million visitors, and over a million people rely on its digital tools to teach, learn, and conduct research."

(Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media)

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TAGS

1994Alfred P. Sloan Foundation • American Council of Learned Societies • American Historical Association • Andrew W. Mellon Foundationarts and humanitiesCenter for History and New Media • CHNM • computer technology • democratisation of history • Department of Education • digital mediadigital toolsdiverse audiences • Florence Gould Foundation • George Mason University • Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation • historical education • history • history online • Institute of Museum and Library Services • Library of Congress • multiple voices • National Endowment for the Humanities • National Humanities Center • new media • popular participation • presenting the past • preservationpreserving the past • Rockefeller Foundation • Roy Rosenzweig • Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media • W. K. Kellogg Foundation • William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 APRIL 2012

Revised AHRC Research Funding Guide for Practice-Led Research

"If you are applying for funding to support a practice–led research project, please read the following advice for framing your proposal.

For your research to be considered as practice–led, your own practice must be an integral part of the proposed programme of research, and the creative and/or performative aspects of the research must be made explicit. Interdisciplinary proposals are welcomed, including those which fall within subjects traditionally defined as humanities as long as the main focus of the research is practice–led.

The research carried out should bring about enhancements in knowledge and understanding in the discipline, or in related disciplinary areas. This requirement excludes research to provide content. For example, if a film–maker wanted to make a film about refugees, the research questions should be about the process of making the film, not about the experience of the refugees. Work that results purely from the creative or professional development of an artist, however distinguished, is unlikely to fulfil the requirements of research."

(AHRC, p.72)

2). Arts and Humanities Research Council (January 2012). "Research Funding Guide" Version 1.7

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TAGS

2012AHRCarts and humanitiesArts and Humanities Research Councilcontribution to knowledgecreative practice researchdesign research projectguidelinesHEI • Independent Research Organisation • interdisciplinary • interdisciplinary proposals • knowledge and understandingpractice-based research • programme of research • requirements of research • researchresearch fundingResearch Funding Guideresearch processresearch projectresearch questionsresearch requirementsUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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