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Which clippings match 'Courseware' keyword pg.1 of 2
15 SEPTEMBER 2015

OECD report: school technology struggles to make an impact

"Another interpretation is that schools have not yet become good enough at the kind of pedagogies that make the most of technology; that adding 21st-Century technologies to 20th-Century teaching practices will just dilute the effectiveness of teaching.

If students use smartphones to copy and paste prefabricated answers to questions, it is unlikely to help them to become smarter. Educators who want to ensure that students become smarter than a smartphone need to think harder about the pedagogies they are using to teach them.

Technology can amplify great teaching but it seems technology cannot replace poor teaching.

The impact of technology on education delivery remains sub-optimal, because we may over-estimate the digital skills of both teachers and students, because of naive policy design and implementation strategies, because of a poor understanding of pedagogy, or because of the generally poor quality of educational software and courseware.

The results suggest that the connections among students, computers and learning are neither simple nor hard-wired; and the real contributions ICT can make to teaching and learning have yet to be fully realised and exploited.

But the findings must not lead to despair. School systems need to get the digital agenda right in order to provide educators with learning environments that support 21st Century pedagogies and provide children with the 21st Century skills they need to succeed in tomorrow's world."

(Andreas Schleicher, 15 September 2015, BBC News)

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TAGS

2015 • 20th Century teaching practices • 21st century literacies21st Century pedagogies21st Century skills • 21st Century technologies • Andreas Schleicher • challenges and opportunities • computers and learning • copy and paste literacycopy-and-paste culturecoursewarecurriculum delivery • digital agenda • digital literaciesdigital skills • educational software • educators • impact of technology on education delivery • learning environmentsOECDpedagogy • policy design and implementation strategies • prefabricated answers to questions • Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) • school curriculum • school systems • teaching effectiveness • technology use in education

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Australia: people flock online for free university education

"THE NUMBER of people enrolled in free online subjects at Melbourne University has overtaken enrolments at its campuses in less than two months.

The university became the first Australian institute to join online education provider Coursera in September.

Since then more than 52,000 students have enrolled in the university's free massive open online courses, which will begin next year."

(Benjamin Preiss, 3 November 2012, The Age)

TAGS

2012 • academic credit • AustraliaBerkeley (University of California) • certificate of completion • challenges and changesCoursera (provider)coursewaredegree qualification • extend learning out • formal degree • free online education • free online university courses • generate interest • Harvard Universityhigher educationiTunes U • La Trobe University • Margaret Sheil • market regulationmarketizationMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyMassive Open Online CoursesmonitiseMOOCs • MyUniversity (site) • online courseonline education provideropen courseware • outlearning • outreach technology • paid online university courses • qualificationstechnology transforming learningUC Berkeleyuniversity degreeUniversity of Melbourne

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2012

edX: free courses from leading universities

"EdX is a not–for–profit enterprise of its founding partners Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that features learning designed specifically for interactive study via the web. Based on a long history of collaboration and their shared educational missions, the founders are creating a new online–learning experience with online courses that reflect their disciplinary breadth. Along with offering online courses, the institutions will use edX to research how students learn and how technology can transform learning–both on–campus and worldwide. Anant Agarwal, former Director of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, serves as the first president of edX. EdX's goals combine the desire to reach out to students of all ages, means, and nations, and to deliver these teachings from a faculty who reflect the diversity of its audience. EdX is based in Cambridge, Massachusetts and is governed by MIT and Harvard."

(edX, 2012)

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TAGS

2012alone together • Anant Agarwal • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory • course materialscoursewaredisruptive innovatione-pedagogyedX • extra-institutional contexts • free materialsfree use • global education • Harvard University • interactive study • knowledge-based economylearninglearning and doing • learning for interactive study • learning resourcelearning toolMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyMITnetworked learning environmentsnot-for-profitOCW • on-campus learning • online coursesonline delivery • online-learning experience • open learningoutreach technologytechnology transforming learning • tribe of one • VLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MAY 2012

Udacity: open courseware for software engineering

"We believe university–level education can be both high quality and low cost. Using the economics of the Internet, we've connected some of the greatest teachers to hundreds of thousands of students in almost every country on Earth. Udacity was founded by three roboticists who believed much of the educational value of their university classes could be offered online for very low cost. A few weeks later, over 160,000 students in more than 190 countries enrolled in our first class, 'Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.' The class was twice profiled by the New York Times and also by other news media. Now we're a growing team of educators and engineers, on a mission to change the future of education."

(Udacity, Inc., 2012)

Fig.1 "CS253: Web Application Engineering. Learn about engineering web applications with Steve Huffman! By the end of the class, you will have built your own blog to share with the world."

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TAGS

2012artificial intelligence • Charles River Ventures • computer science • course content • course-delivery modelcoursewarecrowdlearning • economics of the Internet • educationeducation technologyeducational media • educational value • elearning • free classes • free courses online • high quality at low cost • how to • Know Labs • learnlearninglearning resourceMassive Open Online CoursesMOOCsonline classesonline lecturesopenopen coursewareOpen Educational Resources (OER) • opencourseware • repositoryresourceroboticistsoftware engineeringStanford University • Steve Huffman • supplemental learningteaching materialstechnology educationUdacity • university classes • web-based publication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2010

E-learning 2.0: content is used rather than read and resembles language or conversation rather than a book or a manual

"What happens when online learning software ceases to be a type of content–consumption tool, where learning is 'delivered,' and becomes more like a content–authoring tool, where learning is created? The model of e–learning as being a type of content, produced by publishers, organized and structured into courses, and consumed by students, is turned on its head. Insofar as there is content, it is used rather than read– and is, in any case, more likely to be produced by students than courseware authors. And insofar as there is structure, it is more likely to resemble a language or a conversation rather than a book or a manual.

The e–learning application, therefore, begins to look very much like a blogging tool. It represents one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications–an environment rather than a system.

It also begins to look like a personal portfolio tool. The idea here is that students will have their own personal place to create and showcase their own work. Some e–portfolio applications, such as ELGG, have already been created. IMS Global as put together an e–portfolio specification. 'The portfolio can provide an opportunity to demonstrate one's ability to collect, organize, interpret and reflect on documents and sources of information. It is also a tool for continuing professional development, encouraging individuals to take responsibility for and demonstrate the results of their own learning'."

(Stephen Downes, 17 October 2005)

Fig.1 Andrey Nepomnyaschev, 'Six Seconds', LooksLikeGoodDesign.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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