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Which clippings match 'Michael Wesch' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 APRIL 2014

YouTube: new forms of community, expression, identity, interaction

"This is the third lecture in a series titled 'Digital Natives,' referring to the generation that has been raised with the computer as a natural part of their lives, especially the young people who are currently in schools and colleges today. The series seeks to understand the practices and culture of the digital natives, the cultural implications of their phenomenon and the implications for education to schools, universities and libraries.

According to Wesch, it took tens of thousands of years for writing to emerge after humans spoke their first words. It took thousands more before the printing press appeared and a few hundred again before the telegraph did. Today a new medium of communication emerges every time somebody creates a new web application. 'A Flickr here, a Twitter there, and a new way of relating to others emerges,' Wesch said. 'New types of conversation, argumentation and collaborations are realized.'

Enter YouTube, which is not just a technology. 'It's a social space built around video communication that is searchable, taggable and mashable,' Wesch said. 'It is a space where identities, values and ideas are produced, reproduced, challenged and negotiated in new ways.'"

(Library of Congress, 22 May 2008)

Fig.1 Michael Wesch, 23 June 2008, Library of Congress [http://mediatedcultures.net/]

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TAGS

2008amateur cultural production • anthenticity crisis • anthropologyappropriation • AtheneWins • authenticity • Bomb Iran (song) • Charlie Bit My Finger (2007) • Chevrolet Tahoe • Chevycollaborative productioncommunication mediumcommunity building • connection without constraint • context collapse • cultural anthenticity • demassified mediadigital ethnographydigital nativedigital texts • Dragostea Din Tei • fakesterflash frameFlickr • gaming the system • Gary Brolsma • global connectivity • Hi YouTube • home videohuman interaction • identity negotiation • identity performanceidentity production • illumistream • individualism • Kansas State University • Lawrence LessigLibrary of Congress • LisaNova • LonelyGirl15 • MadV • Marshall McLuhanmedia culture • media ecology • mediascapemediated culturememeMichael Weschnetworked individualismnetworked production • new forms of community • new forms of expression • new forms of identity • new forms of interactionnew media • new types of conversation • new ways of engaging • new ways of relating to others • Numa Numa (video) • participant observationparticipatory mediaprinting press • re-taking identity • reappropriation • Regina Spektor • remix cultureremixingRobert Putnam • seriously playful participatory media culture • sharingsocial space • Soulja Boy (video) • telegraph • user-generated content • video communication • video lecturevideo sharingvlogweb applicationwebcamYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
30 JUNE 2012

Pedagogical affordances of syndication, aggregation, and mash-up of content on the Web

"As Internet and online learning become more and more incorporated into our courses, syllabi, and teaching materials, it becomes increasingly important that the impact the Web is having on changing perceptions of literacy carries over to the way we practice teaching and learning. Here we will focus on which collaborative online tools can most appropriately be applied in online and blended courses to foster reading and writing. Specifically, we will discuss some of the freely available social networking platforms and tools, their common features, and how these can help language learners find, aggregate and harvest learning objects while connecting to other people on the Web at large. We will also introduce two web publishing projects, Dekita.org and Writingmatrix, and explain how they function to facilitate this process and encourage connections."

(Barbara Dieu and Vance Stevens, 2007)

Fig.1 Michael Wesch, "The Machine is Us/ing Us (Final Version)" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLlGopyXT_g]

2). Barbara Dieu and Vance Stevens (June 2007). TESL–EJ: "Pedagogical Affordances of Syndication, Aggregation, and Mash–up of Content on the Web". TESL–EJ, Volume 11, Number 1. Available online:http://tesl–ej.org/ej41/int.html.

TAGS

2007academic journal • aggregate and harvest • aggregation • blended courses • blended learning • changing perceptions • collaborative online tools • common features • connecting to other peoplecontent on the webcourses • Dekita.org • encourage connections • English as a second language • freely available • impact of the Web • Internetlanguage learnerslearning objectsliteracymash-upMichael Weschonline learning • pedagogical affordances • reading and writing • social networking platforms • social networking tools • syllabi • syllabussyndicationteaching and learningteaching materialsteaching practicewebweb publishing • Writingmatrix

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JULY 2009

IA Summit 09 - Keynote Speech from Digital Anthropologist Michael Wesch

"Michael Wesch opened the IA Summit this year with a keynote that provides a fresh and ambitious direction for designers.

He points out that our 'audiences' aren't audiences at all, but rather creators, and our job is not to lecture but to enable.. The following is an outline of some of his key points; but listen to the clip to learn more.

Contrast Reveals Mediation
Wesch tells several stories about his study of cultural anthropology and how those illustrate how Western culture, and in particular US culture, has become completely mediated.

Inspiration Trumps
He then illustrates the process of how his video The Machine Is Us/ing Us becomes an internet phenomenon and how its rise represents an alternative to the mass media machine that has developed in the US over the last several decades.

Varieties of Media Bias
Content bias (e.g. liberal or conservative bent) is only one of many types of media bias, and that all of them add up to 'metaphysical bias.' The effects of this have not changed much over time, that comments made about the printing press can help us reflect on what is happening in the current environment. Wesch wants us, as the creators of the tools, to think about what environment we want to create and work towards it.

Checking Out
Using his classroom as a crucible, Wesch delves into how US culture arrived in its current state, using the assembly line as the starting place, moving through MTV, and onto American Idol. As a part of this journey, he traces the history of 'whatever' and comments on the current cultural impotence.

Burgeoning Transformation
Wesch then assembles a multi–faceted picture that there is hope for our culture through the interaction of digital artifacts. He spends a significant portion of the talk showing various example of these conversations. YouTube acts as a meme–spreader and remix environment, and Twitter allows you to see yourself clearly.

4chan, the disputably infamous 'imageboard,' morphs into Anonymous and plays tricks on over 9000 celebrities and groups that take themselves too seriously. Wesch makes the point that we're in the midst of a 'context collapse,' examines what that means, and shows what people are trying to do with the tools that are currently available.

Architectures of Participation
In the end, 'Architectures of Participation are becoming the architecture of our daily life.' Designers will be shaping the tools that shape the culture and hopes that our community of practice can help humanity 'do whatever it takes by whatever means necessary.'"
(Jeff Parks, Boxes and Arrows, 2009/04/05)

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CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
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