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Which clippings match 'Physical Environment' keyword pg.1 of 2
02 MAY 2015

Aboriginal People's Relationship to Land

"Every different clan group has stories about their beginnings. Stories are like our archives, detailing how Creator Beings from under the earth arose to shape the land and to create the landscape. There are myriad variations of the story, but the theme stays the same.

The whole surface of the earth was like a moonscape, no features, no flora and fauna, just bare open plain. But there were Creator Beings sleeping in a state of potentiality just under the surface. At a certain time they were disturbed, whereupon their potentiality transformed into actuality and they arose out of the ground. When they finally emerged, they were very big and tall. These beings were spirit ancestors of many of the varieties of flora and fauna, especially large animals, in Australia. When this emergence was completed, the spirit ancestors started to interact with one another, fighting, dancing, running about, making love, killing. All of this activity shaped the Australian landscape as we know it today.

Throughout this period humans remained asleep in various embryonic forms, in a state like a kind of proto-humanity. They were awakened by all the activity above; the Creator Beings helped these proto-humans to become fully human, teaching them the Laws of custodianship of land, the Laws of kinship, of marriage, of correct ceremonies-they gave them every kind of knowledge they needed to look after the land and to have a stable society.

When this work was finished, the Creator Beings went back into the land, where they all still remain in the same eternal sleep from which they awakened at the beginning of time. The locations to which they returned have always been and are still today regarded as very important sacred sites.

Wherever the Creator Beings travelled, they left tracks or some kind of evidence of themselves. These traces determined the identity of the people. In other words, every Aboriginal person has a part of the essence of one of the original creative spirits who formed the Australian landscape. Therefore each person has a charter of custodianship empowering them and making them responsible for renewing that part of the flora and its fauna. The details of this metaphysics varied widely across the land with the physical environment, but the spiritual basis-the understanding that what separates humans from animals is the fact that each human bears a creative and spiritual identity which still resides in land itself-provided and still provides in many places the religious, social, political and economic force throughout Aboriginal Australia."

(Mary Graham, 2008)

Australian Humanities Review 45 (November 2008): "Mary Graham: Philosophical Underpinnings of Aboriginal Worldviews". This essay was originally published in Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion 3 (1999): 105-118.

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Aboriginal Australia • Aboriginal mythology • Aboriginal worldviews • ancestral beings • Association for the Study of Australian Literature (ASAL) • Australian Humanities Review (AHR) • Australian landscape • beginnings • belonging • charter of custodianship • clan • clan group • creation narrative • creative and spiritual identity • Creator Beings • custodianship • customs • embryonic forms • eternal sleep • fauna • florafolkloreIndigenous Australians • Juanita Bailey • Kombu-merri person • landland custodianshiplandmarkslandscape • Lilla Watson • Lin Morrow • Mary Grahammetaphysics • open plain • origin mythphysical environment • potentiality • proto-human • proto-humanity • sacred sites • spirit ancestors • symbolic placetimeless time • under the earth • under the surface • worldview

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 SEPTEMBER 2013

Physical Space as Brand Innovation

"Prior to Starbucks, coffee shops in the U.S. were designed to be purely transactional. The most frequently analyzed metric was sales per square feet, and the concept of a store dedicating valuable space just for customers to hang out after they had bought something was unheard of. We all know how it panned out. Starbucks is globally known and a second home for many.

Barnes & Noble adopted the trend. They added lounge chairs and then Starbucks itself to their locations. The bookstore café became a place to visit consistently and to explore, hang out, and to be alone together.

Last week, I spent two hours online at a Peet's Coffee & Tea in Santa Clara, California. Something important has changed: People now work independently online. Before the days of free wifi, people used to mingle with friends over coffee. At Peet's, I spent most of my time in my "fourth places"––my online communities, including Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and OpenSky. Looking around, everyone was doing the same. We came for the wifi and bought the coffee."

(John Caplan, 16 September 2013, Inc.com)

Fig.1 Nick Kenrick [http://www.flickr.com/photos/zedzap/6820585431/]

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alone togetherBarnes and Noble • bookstore cafe • brand innovation • cafe officecafe society • coffee shops • effective brand spaceenvironment that adds value • fourth place • free wifi • hanging out • Inc.com • lounge chairs • mingleonline communities • OpenSky • Peets Coffee and Tea • physical consumer spacephysical environmentphysical retail spacephysical space • place to visit • retail space • sales per square feet • Santa Clara • shop conceptsshopping behavioursocial appssocial fragmentationspatial environmentsStarbuckstransactionWiFi • work independently online • working practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2012

Inspiring retail spaces: Camper and Aesop

"When it comes to retail concepts, few brands create spaces as diverse and conceptual as Camper and Aesop. Both brands, though fundamentally different in their origins and sales offerings, showcase a strong affinity to design. Design plays an instrumental role in the consumer experience of their brand. Choosing design innovation as a life style that applies not only to their product allows them to push the envelope for unique solutions with every new store they open. In addition it is to note that Aesop often uses recycled materials or packaging elements creatively in new context. What makes it special is the fact that they team with independent designers (often locals reflecting best on local context) in creating shop concepts, ensuring each is totally unique in its setting in opposition to the trend of global uniformity."

(omni//form)

Fig.1 Aesop, Brisbane, Australia.
Fig.2 Camper, Granada.

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Aesop (brand) • affinity to design • brand • brand communication • Camper (brand) • create spaces • design innovationdesign interiorseffective brand space • global uniformity • independent designers • inspirationalinterior designlifestyle • local context • local designers • packaging elements • physical consumer spacephysical environmentphysical retail spacephysical spacerecycled materialsretail conceptsretail spaceretail store • sales offerings • shop conceptsunifying metaphorunifying strategy • unique solutions • visual dramavisual merchandising

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2012

Plug and play: the 'new purpose' of physical consumer space

"an effective physical connection is still absolutely imperative to brand success. Rather than assuming that the physical space is being hindered by the growth of digital activity, brands and designers are beginning to embrace the newer channels where consumers are choosing to spend their time and deliver a physical environment that adds value around these. Get the basic understanding of the 'new purpose' of the physical space right and the physical manifestation of the design will boom from there.

The key is to design interiors that can respond and morph with social and cultural shifts, so that the spaces become a form of 'cultural commentary', adding value to the popular activities of today's audiences. Above all, interior design must be approached in a way that ensures that the brand communicates a relevant message through this critical channel. This can be achieved by considering and responding to three key topics: cultural relevance, social context and technology integration."

(Lucy Johnston, Design Week)

Fig. "The Anthropologist", iloveretail.com

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activity and consumption • added valueadded value through design • always connected • audience • brand concepts • brand success • brands • buying online • colourways • communication channel • concrete space • consumer culture • consumer experience • consumerscultural commentarycultural relevance • cultural shifts • design features • design interiors • digital activity • digital designdigital worlddwell timeeffective brand spaceexperience designgraphic designinterior design • Lucy Johnston • new purpose of the physical space • personal freedom • physical connection • physical consumer spacephysical environmentphysical manifestationphysical retail spacephysical space • plug and play • popular activities • print design • relevant messages • respond and morph • social context • social shifts • solid space • spacesspatial designsuccessful brand spacetechnology integrationvirtual world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 NOVEMBER 2009

Verner Panton: synthetic fantasy landscapes

"From the end of the Sixties to the mid–Seventies the chemical company Bayer rented a pleasure boat during every Cologne furniture fair and had it transformed into a temporary showroom by a well–known contemporary designer. The main aim was to promote various synthetics products in connection with home furnishings. Verner Panton was commissioned no less than twice to design this exhibition, entitled 'Visiona'. The 1970 'Visona 2' exhibition showed the Fantasy Landscape which was created in this environment. The resulting room installation consisting of vibrant colours and organic forms is one of the principal highlights of Panton's work. In terms of design history this installation is regarded as one of the major spatial designs of the second half of the twentieth century.

The creative fireworks which Panton lit with his studio within a preparation time of only a few months for 'Visiona 2' is expressed not only in the highly diversified room designs in the exhibition ship, but also in the wide range of furniture, lighting, wall coverings and textiles developed specially for this presentation. Some of these were adapted and went into series production later."

(Verner Panton)

Visiona 2, Verner Panton, Panton Design, Showroom, Ausstellung, Cologne furniture fair; Visiona 2, Biographie, Verner Panton, imm cologne, Kölner Möbelmesse; Vitra–157; VP–13–H906, Panton Design, Basel

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1960s19701970sambience • Basel • Bayer • Cologne • Cologne furniture fair • colourcolour and lightcreative practicedesignenvironmentexhibitionfantastic architecture • fantasy landscape • furniture fair • futuristic designgroovyhome furnishingsimmersive experienceinstallationinterior designinterior stylinglight and space • organic forms • Panton Design • physical environment • pleasure boat • presencespacespace age lookspace-framespatial designspectaclespectacular architecturesyntheticsynthetic fibreVerner Panton • Visiona

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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