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Which clippings match 'Modernist Architecture' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 MARCH 2016

Josef Frank Exhibition: Against Design in Vienna

"The exhibition JOSEF FRANK: Against Design presents the full scope of Frank's pioneering and diverse oeuvre. In light of his prodigious output of furniture and textile designs that remain current to this day and his intensive involvement with the possibilities of architecture and living in the modern era, the title Against Design might at first seem a puzzling choice for an exhibition on Josef Frank. Frank, whose work as a designer and design critic continues to be considered contemporary today, represented a pragmatic approach to design and argued for a simple and 'normal'—but by no means normative—architecture and design. He believed that existing elements should be taken into account as a matter of course and intuitively developed for practical use, without striving toward representation and innovation. To Frank, it was not so much the formal qualities, but those of social experience that were important; his interiors and household objects were not intended to be subjected to formalist concepts, but placed at the service of convenience.

Especially today, Josef Frank's ideas about an uncontrived and unpretentious functionality, whose aim was an independent, free, enlightened bourgeois domestic culture far from stylistic dogmas and fashionable conventions, seem more relevant than ever."

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applied artsarchitecture • architecture and design • Austria • Austrian architect • Austrian designer • Austrian Museum of Applied Arts and Contemporary Art • design • design critic • designer • diverse oeuvre • domestic culture • exhibition • fashionable conventions • formal qualities • furniture design • household objects • interior design • intuitively developed • Josef Frank • living in the modern era • modernist aestheticsmodernist architecturemodernist furniturenon-representationaloeuvre • pioneering oeuvre • practical use • pragmatic approach to desig • prodigious output • service of convenience • social experience • stylistic dogma • textile design • uncontrived functionality • unpretentious functionality • Vienna

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2014

Hot Modernism: mid-twentieth-century Queensland architecture

Exhibition: "Hot Modernism: Building modern Queensland 1945–75", 9 July – 12 October 2014. State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct South Bank, Brisbane, Australia.

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1960s2014architecture • Barry Walduck • better ways of living • Brisbanebuilding • building design • Carina • Central Technical College • colour field • custodian • deck • design idealsdesign traditionsdining room • domestic architecture • Eisenmenger House • elevated house • exhibition • international flavour • International Stylekitchen • local practices • mass production ideals • mid-centurymid-century designmodernismmodernist aestheticsmodernist architecture • modernist art • new approachesnew approaches to design • new architecture • open-plan lounge • poolpost-war architectureQueenslandquestioning traditionssimplified forms • simplified lines • State Library of Queensland • subtropical climate • timber house • traditional building • tropical climate • use of colour • veranda • visual style

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2014

The Fountainhead: a testament to uncompromising individualism

"The work of Rand, most of it published between the 1940s and 1960s, was very popular in the United States and gained a large and still active following. Rand developed her own school of philosophy called Objectivism, that centers on the principle of selfishness. In her novels and philosophical works, Rand advocates a form of rational and ethical egoism, and a political order based on laissezfaire capitalism. Her two novels, Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) are lengthy portrayals of strong individuals who heroically and steadfastly pursue their lives according to Rand's philosophical principles."

(P.W. Zuidhof, p.84, 2012)

Zuidhof, P. W. (2012). "Ayn Rand: Fountainhead of neoliberalism?" Krisis: Journal for contemporary philosophy(1).

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19431949American dreamarchitect • artistic vision • Atlas ShruggedAyn Rand • battle of wills • challenging conventionscollectivismcompromiseconventionalitycreative geniusdesign commissioningdesign conventions • Edward Carrere • egoegoism • ethical egoism • fear of failure • form and function • form follows function • Frank Lloyd Wrightfree willfunctionalism • Gary Cooper • Howard Roark • human actionidealism • independent-mindedness • individualism • integrity • International Styleisolated sort of geniuslaissez faire capitalismLe CorbusierLudwig Mies van der Rohemelodramamodernist architecturemodernist idealsmoral purposeneoliberalismnewspaper tycoonnon-conformistobjectivismoptimistic idealPatricia Neal • personal integrity • personal visionpowerquestioning traditionsradical architecture • rational egoism • rational self-interest • rise to power • romantic notion of the artist • rousing speech • self-interestselfishnessskyscraper • smear campaign • struggle in obscurity • The Fountainhead • uncompromising integrity • uncompromising vision • weak-mindedness • William Kueh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2013

Designs for Great Architectural Landmarks that Were Never Built

"If you're writing an alternate history, these would be the buildings you'd want to include. They're the discarded designs for famous landmarks." (Vincze Miklós)

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Adolf Loos • architectural landmark • British Eiffel Tower • Bruno Tautbuildingsclassical formcultural historydesign proposalsdiscarded designsEiffel Tower • famous landmarks • fantastic architecture • Great Tower of London • Joseph Marzella • Kurz Schutz • landmarks • Lincoln Memorial • modernist architecturemonumentneoclassicism • plans • proposalsshapesketchesskyscraperspeculative architecture • Sydney Opera House • The Metropolitan Towertower • Tower Bridge (London) • Trafalgar Square (London) • Unbuilt Washington (exhibition) • Walter Gunther • Washington Monument • White House

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2013

Metro-land: romanticising the mundane

Metro–Land, the 1973 BBC documentary was Sir John Betjeman's "gift to romanticise the mundane: in this case a tube ride from Baker Street to Amersham, celebrating the north–west London suburbs created by the Metropolitan Railway between 1910 and 1933. ...

'Metro–Land' was the advertising slogan developed to entice workers from cramped homes in Central London out into the rural paradise of Middlesex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. It was invented in 1915 by the Metropolitan Railway's in–house copywriter James Garland, who according to legend was ill with influenza and sprang out of bed when he thought of the term. ...

It was, of course, largely a con. The creation of Metro–Land destroyed the very thing – open countryside – which was used to advertise it. The speculative homes thrown up around the new stations bore few resemblances to the Tudor cottages depicted in the advertising materials: most were dreary semis, constructed at great haste and sold for as little as £400 each. Modern first–time buyers can only dream: that is equivalent to just £20,000 in today's money."

(Telegraph Media Group Limited, 26 Sep 2006)

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1920s1973 • advertising bumf • Baker Street • Benjamin Baker • Boyle Lawrence • British Empire Exhibition • Buckinghamshire • Charles Voysey • commuter belt • countryside • Edward Watkin • electrolier • Eric Sims • first-time buyers • Harrow Hill • Henry Thraile • Hertfordshireidylinterwar period • John Betjeman • Len Rawle • London Transport • meadowland • Metro-Land • Metropolitan Line • Middlesex • modernist architecture • Norman Shaw • north Londoners • nostalgic tributeopen countryside • Palace of Arts • periurbanisation • railway • rural paradise • rural social change • semi-detached housing • social history • suburban sprawl • suburbanisationThe Metropolitan Tower • Tudor cottage • tv documentaryurban sprawl • Watkins Folly • Wembley Stadium • Willesden

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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