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Which clippings match 'Aeroplane' keyword pg.1 of 2
05 JANUARY 2014

Interactive billboards that drop angels on your head

"There you are in the middle of the city, traffic all around, planes buzzing above and you notice a little boy on a giant screen pointing up. 'Look,' says the boy. And you look, and the on–screen boy is pointing at an actual plane flying in the sky. He knows its flight number, its destination. This is no joke. That is flight BA475 from Barcelona! He tracks its path with his little hand, and then, when the plane is gone, he dashes off. This is a British Airways display ad in London's Piccadilly Circus, and it's using to identify actual planes in the actual sky.

Digital billboards are stepping up their game. They are becoming . There's another stunning example at Euston Station (also in London) that shows a man furiously screaming at a woman who is clearly frightened. But you can help. If you have a cellphone, you can yank the man clear across the station, dragging him from screen to screen to screen until he's way on the other side of the terminal.

I've got one more. This time it's a fantasy experience available to anyone who steps into a marked spot in the middle of Victoria Station. (London's a happening place for billboard experimentation.) Once you're there, a holographic angel drops down from heaven and lands beside you. You can't see her in real space, but you and she are plainly visible on a screen that everybody in the station can see, and you are free to interact anyway you please."

(Robert Krulwich, 04 January 2014, NPR)

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TAGS

2014advertising in public spacesaeroplaneangelawareness raisingbillboardboy • British Airways • cellphonecreative advertising • cute girl • digital billboardsdigital displaysdigital screens • display ad • domestic violence • e-motion screens • Euston Station • experience design • fantasy experience • flight number • flying • frighten • furious • get involvedholograph • interactive billboard • interactive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screen • intervene • JCDecaux • London Victoria • Lynx Excite • manmobile phone • National Centre for Domestic Violence (NCDV) • NPROgilvy Group UK • Piccadilly Circus • pointing • public spacescream • screen to screen • sky • surveillance technology • train station • Victoria Station • visual communicationwoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2013

Earth houses give pupils refuge from Heathrow noise

"Buildings originally designed for earthquake and emergency zones in Asia and Africa are now being erected in London playgrounds to shield schoolchildren from the noise of aircraft landing at Heathrow. ...

The superadobe design was an invention of the Iranian architect Nader Khalili, originally with a view to lunar settlements but first employed in a refugee crisis after the 1990–91 Gulf war, before answering the needs of west London's noise–afflicted schoolchildren. The buildings can withstand tremors with a magnitude of up to 5.7. Their domes are also immune to the damage occasionally wrought on local homes' tiled roofs by vortices from incoming jets.

The headteacher, Kathryn Harper–Quinn, estimates that when outside, teachers are rendered inaudible to pupils for 25 seconds in every 90. 'I've been very concerned about the effects of the noise on the children's learning,' she said.

In the huts, she added, 'you can still hear the planes but you can also hear your own voice'. She said that as outdoor learning was both valued by teachers and a statutory part of the curriculum, staff had developed strategies to deal with aircraft noise, including the use of whistles to alert children who could not hear when teachers were speaking.

She said it was also important that the adobe structures were a refuge for children outside lesson times. 'When kids are playing they are also developing their language skills, and in the playground again they're being interrupted.'"

(Gwyn Topham, 22 April 2013, The Guardian)

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TAGS

adobe structuresaeroplaneair traffic • aircraft landing • aircraft noise • airport noise • amphitheatre • built environmentchildren • dome • environmental noise • excessive noise • flight-path • Hounslow Heath • hut • inaudible • infant school • Iranian • Julian Faulkner • Kathryn Harper-Quinn • kidslandscape architecturelanguage skills • London Heathrow Airport • Nader Khalili • noise • noise level • noise pollution • outdoor noise • outside lesson • passenger aircraftplace for childrenplaygroundprimary schoolrefuge • roar • Slough • superadobe • The GuardianUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2013

Flightradar24.com: live air traffic tracker

"Flightradar24 is a flight tracking service that provides you with real–time info about thousands of aircraft around the world. ... [It] started as a hobby project in 2006 when two Swedish aviation geeks decided to build a network of ADS–B receivers in Northern and Central Europe. In 2009 we opened up the network, and made it possible for anyone with an ADS–B receiver to upload data to the network. Many parts of the world were quickly covered, but the quest to provide global ADS–B coverage is still ongoing. Hopefully with your support, we will get there."

(Flightradar24 AB, 2013)

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TAGS

2006 • ADS-B • ADS-B data • ADS-B receivers • ADS-B transponder • aeroplaneair trafficaircraft • airspace • Android OS • aviation • datadata visualisation • FAA • Federal Aviation Administration • flight • flight tracking • flight tracking service • flight-path • Flightradar24 • graphic representationinformation cartographyiOS • Mac OS • mapmappingpassenger aircraftradarreal-timeservicetrafficvisuo-spatial structuring of information • Windows 8

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2012

Zotero: an easy-to-use digital research tool

"Zotero is an easy–to–use yet powerful research tool that helps you gather, organize, and analyze sources (citations, full texts, web pages, images, and other objects), and lets you share the results of your research in a variety of ways. An extension to the popular open–source web browser Firefox, Zotero includes the best parts of older reference manager software (like EndNote) – the ability to store author, title, and publication fields and to export that information as formatted references – and the best parts of modern software and web applications (like iTunes and del.icio.us), such as the ability to interact, tag, and search in advanced ways. Zotero integrates tightly with online resources; it can sense when users are viewing a book, article, or other object on the web, and – on many major research and library sites – find and automatically save the full reference information for the item in the correct fields. Since it lives in the web browser, it can effortlessly transmit information to, and receive information from, other web services and applications; since it runs on one's personal computer, it can also communicate with software running there (such as Microsoft Word). And it can be used offline as well (e.g., on a plane, in an archive without WiFi)."

(Dan Cohen & Sean Takats)

TAGS

aeroplaneaggregating relevant contentAlfred P. Sloan FoundationAndrew W. Mellon Foundationbibliography software • browser extension • Center for History and New MediacitationDan CohenDel.icio.usdigital libraries • digital research tool • easy-to-use • EndNoteFirefox • full text • gather together • George Mason Universityinformation in contextinformation on the webiTunesknowledge integrationknowledge repository • library sites • Microsoft Word • Mozilla Firefox • offline • online archives • online resourcesopen sourceorganise • receive information • reference informationreference managerresearch toolSean Takatssearchshared collectiontaggingtool • United States Institute of Museum and Library Services • web applicationweb browserweb serviceWiFiZotero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

Sound Mirrors: dead-end technology

"Pioneered by the obsessive Dr W.S. Tucker of the Royal Engineers, the concrete sound mirrors were intended to provide early warning of incoming enemy aeroplanes and airships about to attack coastal towns.

But with the development of faster aircraft and the increasing racket from the holiday resort down the road, the effectiveness of the mirrors twindled as an aircraft would be within sight by the time it had been located. The last nail was finally driven into the coffin of this uniquely English folly by the evolution of radar systems, so by 1934 they had tragically became obsolete."

(David Barrington, 04.07.2006)

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TAGS

19161930s1934 • acoustic mirrors • aeroplaneaircraft • airships • architectureconcretedead-end technology • early warning • engineeringEnglandenvironmentindustrial archaeologyindustrial designlistening earsmilitary complexmilitary hardwaremirrornational securityobsolescenceobsolete technologyradar • Royal Engineers • sound mirror • techno-scientifictechnologyUK • W.S. Tucker • World War IWW1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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