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Which clippings match 'Orson Welles' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 DECEMBER 2013

Orson Welles laments his career and struggles with Hollywood

An interview with Orson Welles taped on 3rd October 1985.

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1985black hat characterCitizen Kanecompromisecreative vision • film actor • film directorfilm industryHollywoodinfluential directorinterview • lamentation • life stories • marketplacemodern worldmovie-makingOrson Wellespersonal and professional needspersonal creative interests • personal insight • personal reflections • reflection and criticism • regret • ridiculous business • romantic notion of the artisttelevision interviewwhite hat character

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 AUGUST 2013

Kevin Spacey: television has entered a new golden age

"He said Netflix ... had proved one thing: 'The audience wants control. They want freedom. If they want to binge–as they've been doing on House of Cards–then we should let them binge.

'We have learned the lesson that the music industry didn't learn: give people what they want, when they want it, in the form they want it in, at a reasonable price, and they'll more likely pay for it rather than steal it. Well, some will still steal it, but I believe this new model can take a bite out of piracy.'

But if the medium was to continue in this rich vein, TV executives would have to adapt to the way viewers want to binge on their favourite programmes on the internet or by watching DVD box sets, Spacey said.

Younger viewers no longer saw any difference between watching TV and online. 'For kids growing up, there's no difference between watching Avatar on an iPad or watching YouTube on a TV and watching Game of Thrones on their computer. It's all content. It's all story,' he said."

(John Plunkett and Jason Deans, 22 August 2013, The Guardian)

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1950s1980s • Aaron Paul • AMC • AMC Networks • American Beauty • American Movie Classics (AMC) • art formaudience • binge • Breaking Bad (television) • broadcasterbroadcasting • Bryan Cranston • cable channel • cable televisioncharacter-driven stories • cliff-hanger • complex characterisation • control • David Fincher • demassificationdemassified media • DVD box set • Edinburgh Television Festival • Game of Thrones (television) • golden age • HBO • Hill Street Blues • Home Box Office (HBO) • Homeland (television) • House of Cards • iPad • Jack Lemmon • Kevin Spacey • Mad Menmusic industryNetflixOrson Wellespilot episode • programme maker • risk averserisk-taking • sense of total abandon • small screenstorytellingtechnological changetelevision channeltelevision networktelevision programming • The Sopranos (television) • The Usual Suspects • TV • video-streaming service • YouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Alex Shutti
23 JANUARY 2013

Citizen Kane: famous film transition from a photograph to real life

"Another transition takes us to the same three men, this time reflected in the window of the Chronicle, Kane's major rival (Circulation 495,000). 'I know you're tired, Gentlemen... Kane begins, suggesting the men have come straight from the offices of the Inquirer after spending all night getting the paper out. The scene not only illustrates Kane's tireless ambition, but provides a seamless transition from the humble beginnings of the Inquirer to the day, six years later, when Kane has managed to poach the entire reporting staff captured in a photograph prominently positioned in the window of the Chronicle on that first night. The camera slowly dollies in on the reporters as Bernstein tells Kane it took the Chronicle twenty years to gather such a highly respected staff. 'Twenty years?' says Kane, 'Wells' – and suddenly, as the sentence Kane speaks spans six years, the reporters are no longer still images in a photograph but moving, breathing people – 'six years ago I looked at a picture of the world's greatest newspapermen. I felt like a kid in front of a candy store.' Kane himself then enters from the left, looking prosperous and confident..."

(Movie Movie)

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1941 • captured in a photograph • Charles Foster Kane • Citizen Kanecoming to life • Everett Sloane • film transition • group photograph • humble beginnings • Joseph Cotten • living photonewspaper • newspaper circulation • newspaper tycoon • newspapermen • Orson Wellesphotograph • poach • reflected in the window • reporters • reporting staff • respected staff • scene transition • screen-mediated virtual space • seamless transition • sequence transitionshop windowtableau • The Chronicle • The Inquirer • transition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2011

Welles and Toland's use of deep screen space in Citizen Kane

"It begins with young Charles Kane in long shot, playing with his sled in the snow. The camera then pulls back to reveal that it has been shooting through a window. This effect creates a visual metaphor. The boy playing in the snow is not as free as he at first seems. Just as his image is suddenly confined by a window frame, so his life will be circumscribed by a decision that is being made for him inside the house. Kane's mother appears at the window calling out to her son to 'Be careful,' and 'Put your muffler around your neck, Charles.' As the camera tracks back, wards from the window into the space of the house, it reveals Mr. Thatcher standing at the right of the window. He says, 'We'll have to tell him now.' Ignoring this comment, the mother replies, 'I'll sign those papers now, Mr. Thatcher.' From frame left Kane's father appears, saying, 'You people seem to forget that I'm the boy's father.' The camera tracks backwards as Mrs. Kane walks over to a desk in the foreground of the image and sits down to sign the papers, with Thatcher seated next to her. An argument ensues in which the father, who appears in the middle ground of the image, strongly protests the mother's decision to hand his son over to a bank and threatens to take the case to court. The mother is icily adamant in honoring the agreement she has made with Thatcher. In exchange for the bank's full assumption of the management of the gold mine (the Colorado Lode), the bank which Thatcher represents will assume full responsibility for all matters concerning the boy's education and place of residence. Mr. and Mrs. Kane will receive fifty thousand dollars a year as long as they both live. This last bit of information, which Thatcher reads aloud, silences the father, who mutters, 'Well, let's hope it's all for the best.'

Throughout the scene, while all this activity takes place, we can see the boy Charles playing with his sled far in the back of the image, in extreme long shot, framed by the window pane, and totally oblivious to the momentous decision his mother has made about his life. Because of the length of the shot and the careful blocking of the action, our eye is free to focus on whichever player we choose, or our attention can wander from one player to another, as if we were spectators in the theater.

At the same time, the camera places us sufficiently close to the actors in the foreground of the image that we can read their expressions with much greater clarity than would be possible in the theater. We can look for clues in the frozen but somehow anguished expression of Mrs. Kane for why she is so determined to separate herself from her son. We can wonder in observing the slightly exasperated and nervous expression on Thatcher's face what kind of guardian he will make for a young boy. Or we can observe the father's angry, worried expression and wonder why he backs down. The father's position further back in the screen space makes him seem smaller than his wife and Mr. Thatcher, his diminished size somehow appropriate to his lack of power to influence his son's fate. The crowning brilliance of the scene is the tiny image of Charles Kane far in the depth of the screen space. Although the film is about him and in later scenes he will loom large indeed, here he is a tiny speck. On first viewing the film, some may not even notice him. But his understated presence playing outside the window, shouting 'Union forever' as his mother is about to send him off into the world without her, is one of the most poignant moments in film."

(Marilyn Fabe, 2004, p.85–86)

3). Marilyn Fabe (2004). "Chapter 5 Expressive Realism" in "Closely Watched Films: An Introduction to the Art of Narrative Film Technique", University of California Press (3 Aug 2004)

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1941bank • blocking of the action • boycamera • Charles Kane • cinematography • circumscribed • Citizen Kane • Colorado Lode • composition • confined • deep focusdepth of the screen spacedesign formalism • diminished size • editing through selection • extreme long shot • fatefigures in spacefilmframe • frame-within-a-frame • framed by the windowframingfreedom • gold mine • Gregg Toland • lack of power • length of the shot • long shot • long takesmise-en-sceneOrson Wellesphotographyplayingscene • screen image • screen space • significant actions • sled • snowsnowballtheatrical spacetracking camera • union forever • visual designvisual languagevisual metaphorwindowwindow frame

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JUNE 2009

Die entfesselte Kamera

"Eine Zusammenstellung der besten und berühmtesten langen Kamerafahrten muss natürlich mit Murnau beginnen. Hier das Treffen des Mannes mit seiner Geliebten in Sunrise (1927) [1] Der Banküberfall in Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950), in einer einzigen Einstellung aus dem Auto gefilmt [2] Die Kamera aus der Ich–Perspektive ... Madame de ... (Max Ophuls, 1953) – nach dem Vorspann ab Minute 1:50 [3] Touch of Evil von Orson Welles (1958), mit der wohl so ziemlich berühmtesten Kamerafahrt [4] Godard ('Eine Kamerafahrt ist eine Frage der Moral.') und sein Weekend (1967) [5] Antonionis Beruf: Reporter (1975) [6] In den letzten zehn bis zwanzig Jahren werden extrem lange Kamerafahrten immer häufiger. Zum einen aufgrund der besseren technischen Möglichkeiten (die Steadycam gibt es seit Mitte der 70er Jahre, Antonioni musste für seine bahnbrechenden Aufnahmen in Beruf: Reporter noch komplizierte Konstruktionen zu Hilfe nehmen) – und zum anderen als Gegenentwicklung, als Ruhepol zu der immer höher werdenden Schnittfrequenz, die mit dem Musikclipsender MTV begann und jüngst mit den Batman– und Jason–Bourne–Filmen einen Höhepunkt erreicht hat. In Martin Scorseses Goodfellas (1990) folgt die Kamera Henry, wie er mit seiner Freundin über den Hintereingang einen Club betritt. Dabei wird unnachahmlich illustriert, welch privilegierte Stellung er genießt [7] Aus Murnaus entfesselter Kamera war zu diesem Zeitpunkt schon ein so beliebtes Stilmittel geworden, dass es Zeit für etwas Ironie wurde. Das zeigt die Anfangssequenz in Robert Altmans The Player (1992), in der sich zwei Darsteller über die besten tracking shots der Filmgeschichte unterhalten [8] Einige besonders kreative Höhepunkte sind seit den 90er Jahren im Genre des Hongkong–Thrillers zu finden. So in John Woos Hard Boiled (1992) [9] Die ersten sieben Minuten von Breaking News (2004) von Johnnie To [10] Ziemlich eindrucksvoll ist auch diese Szene aus The Protector von Prachya Pinkaew (2005) [11] Höhepunkt und Abgesang? In Joe Wrights Atonement von 2007 gerät die knapp fünfminütige Sequenz mit den Landungstruppen am Strand zu einem fast schon aufdringlichen Muskelspiel (ab 0:47) [12] Weitere Beispiele?"
(Thorsten Funke, 20. Juni 2009)

Films famous for their use of single continuous shots:
Sunrise (Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, 1927); Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950); Madame de ... (Max Ophuls, 1953); Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958); Weekend (Jean Luc Godard, 1967); Beruf: Reporter (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1975); Goodfellas (Martin Scorseses, 1990); The Player (Robert Altman, 1992); Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992); Breaking News (Johnnie To Kei–Fung, 2004); The Protector (Prachya Pinkaew, 2005); Atonement (Joe Wright, 2007).

TAGS

19271950195319581967197519901992200420052007 • Atonement • Beruf Reporter • Breaking News (2004) • cinemadesign • F. W. Murnau • film • Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau • Goodfellas • Gun Crazy • Hard Boiled • Jean-Luc Godard • Joe Wright • John Woos • listMartin ScorseseMichelangelo AntonionionesingleshotOrson Welles • Prachya Pinkaew • Robert Altmansingle shotsteadicam • Sunrise • The Player • The Protector • Touch of Evil • tracking shotvisual languagevisual literacyvisualisationWeekend

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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