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Which clippings match 'Michelangelo Antonioni' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 OCTOBER 2017

Heinrich Wölfflin's planimetric composition in films

"The 1960s saw the development of an opposite approach, what we might call the telephoto aesthetic. Improvements in long focal-length lenses, encouraged by the growing use of location shooting, led to a very different sort of imagery. Instead of exaggerating the distances between foreground and background, long lenses tend to reduce them, making figures quite far apart seem close in size. (In shooting a baseball game for television, the telephoto lens positioned behind the catcher presents catcher, batter, and pitcher as oddly close to one another.) Planes seem to be stacked or pushed together in a way that seems to make the space 'flatter,' the objects and figures more like cardboard cutouts."

(David Bordwell, 2005)

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TAGS

Buster Keaton • cardboardy space • cinematographyDavid Bordwellflat picture planeflat space • flatter-looking space • frame stacking • Heinrich Wolfflin • imageryJean-Luc Godard • less voluminous • long lenses • Michelangelo Antonioni • planar composition • planimetric composition • rectangular geometry • stacking • telephoto shot • wide-angle lenses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 SEPTEMBER 2013

The artistic image: 'between the sayable and the visible'

"The sworn enemy of this logic of combination or juxtaposition are the border police of genre classification (typical of art history and its curatorial leanings which seem to contaminate film theory too) who struggle with any notion of redistribution of the sensible. It is in The Future of The Image that Jacques Rancière defines the artistic image as a set of operations or relations 'between the sayable and the visible' and calls this the regime of the 'distribution of the sensible', a status quo which can be altered, through a redistribution, which creates new ways of seeing (Rancière, 2007: 6). In the work of Marker and Godard, such a redistribution of the sensible has been generally understood, categorised as–and duly named–'film–essays', ever since André Bazin coined the phrase, referring specifically to Marker's work as a political and historical type of writing mediated by poetry (Bazin, 1985: 179–181). Fine. But what does the catch–phrase cover? What practice does it immunise? Is there a risk of seriously limiting the scope and aesthetic dimension of such films by segregating them?

Phillip Lopate considers the film–essay a 'cinematic genre that barely exists' in Can Movies Think? In Search of The Centaur: The Essay–Film (Lopate, 1998: 280). It must have words, whether spoken, subtitled, or intertitled. These must represent a single voice and exclude any collage of quoted texts that do not reflect a 'unified perspective'. The film must be an argument, an attempt at working out a problem; it must put across a personal view, and be well–written (Lopate, 1998: 283). However, his classification is quite prescriptive: no interviews are allowed and no documentaries (Lopate, 1998: 305). Yet, Lopate's examples include Resnais's documentary Night and Fog (1955) and his dictate of 'reasoned, essayistic discourse' seems too narrow from the perspective of visual art, and certainly contradicts his celebration of Marker, whose digressive approach to text and image is deliberate in a spiralling multiplicity that brings to mind, for example, Carlo Emilio Gadda's novels which are equally and intentionally digressive and always on the edge of subverting the integrity of the text, or, perhaps closer to home in a French milieu, Georges Perec's roving pen in Species of Spaces and Other Pieces (1997) that picks up from the smallest detail of everyday life a point of departure for a long intellectual journey. In this regard, Italo Calvino's 1985 Harvard lecture on multiplicity, later collected in Six Memos of the next Millenium (1993), provides an excellent cultural context for exploring the method and the creative potential of experimenting beyond the limitations of genre from inside, showing how genre can become a nonsense when its border lines are crossed, because you are invited to look at the real differently; true of these filmmakers, true of Calvino himself, true of the films of Michelangelo Antonioni or of Federico Fellini's too."

(David Brancaleone, 2012, Vertigo Magazine)

Brancaleone, D. (2012). "The Interventions of Jean–Luc Godard and Chris Marker into Contemporary Visual Art". Vertigo Magazine. Spring 2012.

TAGS

Andre Bazinart history • artistic image • border crossings • border/boundaryborderline • Carlo Emilio Gadda • Chris MarkerChristian Boltanski • cinematic genre • classificationcontemporary artcontemporary visual artcuratorial practice • digression • digressive approach • distribution of the sensible • essayistic discourse • experimental cinemaFederico Fellinifilm essayfilm theory • genre classification • genre differentiation • Georges Perec • integrity of the text • interventionist artJacques RanciereJean-Luc GodardjuxtapositionMichelangelo AntonioniMnemosyne Atlasmulti-media collagistmultiplicitiesmultiplicity • new ways of seeing • Night and Fog (1955) • Okwui Enwezor • Phillip Lopate • problem centric approach • redistribution • redistribution of the sensible • sayable • sensible • set of operations • set of relations • Six Memos of the next Millenium (1993) • Species of Spaces and Other Pieces (1997) • text and image • unified perspective • Vertigo (magazine) • video artist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2011

Onscreen discussion of the ontology of the photographic image

"The film commences with a fast moving introduction to the very stylish world of a hot fashion photographer, Thomas, played by that emblematic '60s actor, David Hemmings. This is the world made notorious by magazines like Tatler and Queen as well as all the tabloids of the world, all Pucci fashion, dolly birds (Jane Birkin made her name in this film), drugs, fast cars and rock–and–roll. ...

Throughout Blow Out and Blowup there is always a sense in which recording media themselves are seen as, somehow, treacherous. Antonioni's Blowup forcefully reminds us that even the latest technologies can mislead or betray us. In the computer age, it this remaining element of ontological uncertainty that still troubles the human observer–for we are not, quite yet, masters of information"

(Jonathan Dawson, February 2005, Senses of Cinema)

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1960s1966 • Blow Out (1981) • Blow-Up (1966) • Carlo Ponti • casual sexcontextcoolcountercultureDavid Bailey • David Hemmings • diegetic sound • Edward Bond • fashionfashion modelfashion photographerfashion photography • fashion shoot • feature filmfilm grainHerbie Hancockhuman perception • Jane Birkin • John Castle • Julio Cortazar • layeringLondonmake-upMichelangelo Antonionimod fashionmurderobscured view • ontology of the photographic image • photographphotographer • photographers studio • photographic blow-upsphotographic image • Sarah Miles • Senses of Cinema (journal)sixtiessixties cool • swinging sixties • The Yardbirds • Tonino Guerra • transparency • transparent layers • truth of perception • Tsai Chin Gillian Hills • Vanessa Redgrave • Vera Grafin von Lehndorff-Steinort • Veruschka von Lehndorff • whole is other than the sum of the parts • young lovers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JUNE 2009

Die entfesselte Kamera

"Eine Zusammenstellung der besten und berühmtesten langen Kamerafahrten muss natürlich mit Murnau beginnen. Hier das Treffen des Mannes mit seiner Geliebten in Sunrise (1927) [1] Der Banküberfall in Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950), in einer einzigen Einstellung aus dem Auto gefilmt [2] Die Kamera aus der Ich–Perspektive ... Madame de ... (Max Ophuls, 1953) – nach dem Vorspann ab Minute 1:50 [3] Touch of Evil von Orson Welles (1958), mit der wohl so ziemlich berühmtesten Kamerafahrt [4] Godard ('Eine Kamerafahrt ist eine Frage der Moral.') und sein Weekend (1967) [5] Antonionis Beruf: Reporter (1975) [6] In den letzten zehn bis zwanzig Jahren werden extrem lange Kamerafahrten immer häufiger. Zum einen aufgrund der besseren technischen Möglichkeiten (die Steadycam gibt es seit Mitte der 70er Jahre, Antonioni musste für seine bahnbrechenden Aufnahmen in Beruf: Reporter noch komplizierte Konstruktionen zu Hilfe nehmen) – und zum anderen als Gegenentwicklung, als Ruhepol zu der immer höher werdenden Schnittfrequenz, die mit dem Musikclipsender MTV begann und jüngst mit den Batman– und Jason–Bourne–Filmen einen Höhepunkt erreicht hat. In Martin Scorseses Goodfellas (1990) folgt die Kamera Henry, wie er mit seiner Freundin über den Hintereingang einen Club betritt. Dabei wird unnachahmlich illustriert, welch privilegierte Stellung er genießt [7] Aus Murnaus entfesselter Kamera war zu diesem Zeitpunkt schon ein so beliebtes Stilmittel geworden, dass es Zeit für etwas Ironie wurde. Das zeigt die Anfangssequenz in Robert Altmans The Player (1992), in der sich zwei Darsteller über die besten tracking shots der Filmgeschichte unterhalten [8] Einige besonders kreative Höhepunkte sind seit den 90er Jahren im Genre des Hongkong–Thrillers zu finden. So in John Woos Hard Boiled (1992) [9] Die ersten sieben Minuten von Breaking News (2004) von Johnnie To [10] Ziemlich eindrucksvoll ist auch diese Szene aus The Protector von Prachya Pinkaew (2005) [11] Höhepunkt und Abgesang? In Joe Wrights Atonement von 2007 gerät die knapp fünfminütige Sequenz mit den Landungstruppen am Strand zu einem fast schon aufdringlichen Muskelspiel (ab 0:47) [12] Weitere Beispiele?"
(Thorsten Funke, 20. Juni 2009)

Films famous for their use of single continuous shots:
Sunrise (Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, 1927); Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950); Madame de ... (Max Ophuls, 1953); Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958); Weekend (Jean Luc Godard, 1967); Beruf: Reporter (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1975); Goodfellas (Martin Scorseses, 1990); The Player (Robert Altman, 1992); Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992); Breaking News (Johnnie To Kei–Fung, 2004); The Protector (Prachya Pinkaew, 2005); Atonement (Joe Wright, 2007).

TAGS

19271950195319581967197519901992200420052007 • Atonement • Beruf Reporter • Breaking News (2004) • cinemadesign • F. W. Murnau • film • Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau • Goodfellas • Gun Crazy • Hard Boiled • Jean-Luc Godard • Joe Wright • John Woos • listMartin ScorseseMichelangelo AntonionionesingleshotOrson Welles • Prachya Pinkaew • Robert Altmansingle shotsteadicam • Sunrise • The Player • The Protector • Touch of Evil • tracking shotvisual languagevisual literacyvisualisationWeekend

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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