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26 NOVEMBER 2012

The Minister of Chance: a crowdfunded audio science fiction series

"The Minister of Chance is an audio Science Fiction Fantasy series in the tradition of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and the best in radiophonics. It's free, and you get it by subscribing to the podcast.

The series is entirely funded by its listeners. We have very small budgets, and absolutely no money for publicity - which is why you haven't heard about it til now. You can help by telling everyone you know on Twitter, Facebook, your blog, any Sci-Fi or fantasy sites, reviewers you know, your mum...."

(Clare Eden, MoC Executive Producer)

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TAGS

2012 • Athene Hyde • audience-distribution • audio drama • auditory science fiction • Bruce Collingwood • Chris Mock • Clare Eden • commissioning process • crowdfundingcrowdsourcing • Dan Freeman • Dan Hunt • Doctor Who • drama series • Eloise Whitmore • fantasy • fantasy series • free cultureJed Brophy • Jenny Agutter • Julian Wadham • Karl Philips • Kate Cornish • Keelan Gumbley • Lauren Crace • low budget • Margrethe Nandrup-Pettersen • Mark Lewis • MoC • open distribution • Paul Darrow • Paul McGann • podcastradio • radio drama • radio series • radio show • radiophonic series • sci-fiscience fiction • science fiction fantasy series • Simon Dixon • Sylvester McCoy • The Minister of Chance • Thomas Moulton • Violet Lavinia Brown

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 NOVEMBER 2012

Sita Sings the Blues: audience-distributed animated feature film

"I hereby give Sita Sings the Blues to you. Like all culture, it belongs to you already, but I am making it explicit with a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License. Please distribute, copy, share, archive, and show Sita Sings the Blues. From the shared culture it came, and back into the shared culture it goes.

You don't need my permission to copy, share, publish, archive, show, sell, broadcast, or remix Sita Sings the Blues. Conventional wisdom urges me to demand payment for every use of the film, but then how would people without money get to see it? How widely would the film be disseminated if it were limited by permission and fees? Control offers a false sense of security. The only real security I have is trusting you, trusting culture, and trusting freedom.

That said, my colleagues and I will enforce the Share Alike License. You are not free to copy-restrict ('copyright') or attach Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to Sita Sings the Blues or its derivative works.

Some of the songs in Sita Sings the Blues are not free, and may never be; copyright law requires you to obey their respective licenses. This is not by my choice; please see our restrictions page for more.

There is the question of how I'll get money from all this. My personal experience confirms audiences are generous and want to support artists. Surely there's a way for this to happen without centrally controlling every transaction. The old business model of coercion and extortion is failing. New models are emerging, and I'm happy to be part of that. But we're still making this up as we go along. You are free to make money with the free content of Sita Sings the Blues, and you are free to share money with me. People have been making money in Free Software for years; it's time for Free Culture to follow. I look forward to your innovations."

(Nina Paley)

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TAGS

attribution-share alike • audience-distribution • coercion • control • copy-restrict • copyrightcopyright lawCreative Commons • derivative works • Digital Restrictions Management • disseminationDRMeconomic model • emerging economic models • film fundingfree contentfree culture • free culture movement • free softwarefreedom • making money • Nina Paley • old business model • open distribution • payment • permission • Ramayana • Share Alike License • shared culture • Sita Sings the Blues • support artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2010

Freedom as in what? a debate on open source vs. free culture


"What do we mean by 'freedom'? Should Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) necessarily be powered by radical politics of ownership and collaboration? Or is the latching of 'Free Software' ideological baggage limiting the full transformative power of 'Open Source'. How are these questions informed by licenses? Are some licenses more open than others? More ethical than others? This emotional debate has been in the heart of FLOSS from its early days and has created camps and animosities within the community.

We will examine the strong ideological differences through a provocative panel discussion with Gabriella Coleman and Zachary Lieberman."

(Gabriella Coleman and Zachary Lieberman, Eyebeam.org)

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
03 NOVEMBER 2009

Open source as social organization of production and as a form of technological innovation based on a new conception of property rights

"Open source exposes the new logic of organisation of production in a knowledge intensive economic process. The development of software is made up of digitally encoded knowledge that combines from the bottom up in the process of production. Furthermore, as mentioned above, open source is an experiment in production built around a distinctive notion of property. The traditional notion of property is based on the right to exclude the non owners from the use of something that is owned by someone. On the other hand, open source property is configured around the right to distribute, not the right to exclude. This is in fact in the tradition of 'fair use' of intellectual products that are used without securing their property. Under an extended notion of fair use, no individualīs fair use will be permitted to constrain subsequent fair use by another individual and for any purpose. (On 'fair use', and the transformation of the notion of intellectual property rights see the definitive analysis by Lawrence Lessig 'Free Culture' , 2004)"

(Manuel Castells, World Social Forum 2005)

Presentation by Manuel Castells in the World Social Forum 2005

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TAGS

20042005Creative Commonsfair usefree cultureintellectual propertyintellectual property rightsIPIPRknowledgeLawrence LessigManuel Castellsopen sourceownershipproductionproperty • property rights • remix culturescriptiblesharing • social organisation of production • World Social Forum

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JUNE 2009

CC Talks With: Illegal Art

"A museum exhibit called 'Illegal Art' might sound like a history of naughty pictures. Turns out that the exhibit (through July 25 at SF MOMA Artist's Gallery) is more innocuous than most primetime TV: A Mickey Mouse gasmask. Pez candy dispensers honoring fallen hip-hop stars. A litigious Little Mermaid. Not kids' stuff, exactly-but illegal?

Copyright holders have threatened and sued many of the show's artists for sampling, remixing, and recontextualizing other people's artistic creations without permission. Featuring audio and visual exhibits, a full length CD, and several films, the show highlights how copyright, typically considered an engine of creativity, can stifle art and free speech.

'Copyright is often so esoteric and theoretical,' said Carrie McLaren, the exhibit's curator. 'We wanted to make copyright's problems as real to the average person as they are to our featured artists.'"
(Creative Commons)

TAGS

attributioncommercialismcommonscopyrightcreative capitalCreative Commonsfree culturefunding • lessig • market failuremarkets • no derivatives • non-commercialopen sourceownershippatronpiracy • share-alike • social gainsponsorshipvalue of art

CONTRIBUTOR

David Rogerson
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