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03 JANUARY 2013

The Value of Culture: Two Cultures

"Melvyn Bragg considers the 150–year history of the Two Cultures debate. In 1959 the novelist C.P. Snow delivered a lecture in Cambridge suggesting that intellectual life had become divided into two separate cultures: the arts and the humanities. The lecture is still celebrated for the furore it provoked – but Snow was returning to a battleground almost a century old. Melvyn Bragg visits the old Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, scene of many of modern science's greatest triumphs, to put the Two Cultures debate in its historical context – and Paul Nurse, President of the Royal Society, reveals the influence the Two Cultures debate had on his development as a scientist."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2013)

"The Value of Culture: Two Cultures", Radio broadcast, Episode 3 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Wednesday 02 January 2013, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

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TAGS

1959 • all matters which most concern us • American education • American schools • artistic intellectuals • arts and humanitiesarts education • British education • C P Snow • Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge • Charles Percy Snow • civilisationClassicalclassicscommerce • cultural agenda • cultural high ground • cultureCulture and Anarchydisciplinary protectionism • editorial control • education system • elites • experimental teachingF R Leavis • free thought • German education • German schools • GreekH G Wellshabitshigh culture • illiteracy of scientists • intellectual life • John Tyndall • knowledgeLatin • literary intellectuals • manufacturingmaterialismMatthew ArnoldMelvyn Braggmodern sciencemodern society • Paul Nurse • quality of education • Rede Lecture • reliable official knowledge • Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts Manufactures and Commerce • RSA • schoolingsciencesciences and humanitiesscientific age • scientific culture • scientific education • scientific naturalism • scientific revolution • scientific teaching • scientists • Second Law of Thermodynamics • shared languagesocial class • speaking the same language • stock notions • study of perfection • technological culture • technology • the best which has been thought and said in the world • the classics • The Value of Culture (radio) • Thomas Huxley • traditional culturetwin pillarstwo cultures • Two Cultures debate • two separate cultures

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2010

There was relatively little divide between spectator and performer in the archaic theatre

"In the archaic theatre there was relatively little divide between spectator and performer, seeing and doing; people danced and spoke, then retired to a stone seat to watch others dance and declaim. By the time of Aristotle, actors and dancers had become a caste with special skills of costuming, speaking, and moving. Audiences stayed offstage, and so developed their own skills of interpretation as spectators. As critics, the audience sought to speculate then about what the stage–characters did not understand about themselves (though the chorus on stage sometimes also took on this clarifying role)."

(Richard Sennett, 2008, p.125)

Fig.1 Lysistrata Summer 2006 University of Florida

2). Sennett, R. (2008). "The Craftsman". New Haven & London, Yale University Press.

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2008actor • archaic theatre • Aristotleaudienceauthorshipboundary • chorus • Classicalcostumedance • demarcation • engagementjoinorderingparticipationperformanceperformerRichard Sennettscriptibleseeing and doingshow (spectacle)skillspectatorshipstageThe Craftsmantheatre

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2010

Aristotle's Rhetoric: modes of persuasion

"Of the modes of persuasion furnished by the spoken word there are three kinds. The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker [ethos]; the second on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind [pathos]; the third on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself [logos]. Persuasion is achieved by the speaker's personal character when the speech is so spoken as to make us think him credible."

(Aristotle 1356a 2,3, translation by W. Rhys Roberts)

Aristotle, Book I – Chapter 2 : Aristotle's Rhetoric (hypertextual resource compiled by Lee Honeycutt)

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12 Angry Men • argumentargumentationAristotle • Aristotles Rhetoric • audienceClassical • Classical rhetoric • communicationdramaemotion • ethos • experiencefilmHenry Fondaliteraturelogos • modes of persuasion • narrative • narrative art • pathospersuasionrhetoric • rhetorical theory • suffering • W. Rhys Roberts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2009

The Illusion of Magnitude: Adapting the Epic from Film to Television

"When Giuseppe de Liguoro's Homer's Odyssey (1910) was released in the U.S. in 1912, a review in The Moving Picture World praised it for beginning 'a new epoch in the history of the motion picture as a factor in education' (1). The ambitious claim was made amid the author's desire to see moving pictures adapt Classic sources in such a way to both 'entertain and instruct the average moving picture audience' (2). This aspiration was repeated in the reviews of early U.S. television, which broadcast its own modest 'epics' in the 1950s and '60s in response to the revival of the cinematic epic. Although constrained by limited budgets and an even more limited screen size, television's version of the epic during the 1950s and '60s was applauded for bringing both spectacle and the high–cultural status of Classical works to this often–maligned medium. Focusing on contemporary reviews, this article argues that adaptations of myth were used to promote (and contest) the legitimacy of early television in the United States. (3)"

(Djoymi Baker)

1. W. Stephen Bush, "Homer's Odyssey. Three Reels. (Milano Films.)", The Moving Picture World, Vol. 11, No. 11, 16 March 1912, p. 941.

Fig.1 Francesco Bertolini, Adolfo Padovan and Giuseppe de Liguoro, 1911. 'Homer's Odyssey'

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1911 • adaptation • Adolfo Padovan • cinema • classic • Classicalclassicsepicepic spectacularfilmfilm adaptation • Francesco Bertolini • Giuseppe de Liguoro • history • Homer • mediummini-series • Moving Picture World (magazine) • mythologicalmythologyodysseySenses of Cinema (journal)spectaclespectaculartelevisionvisual communicationvisual spectacular epic

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

Plato's Allegory of the Cave

"Behold! human beings living in a underground cave, which has a mouth open towards the light and reaching all along the cave; here they have been from their childhood, and have their legs and necks chained so that they cannot move, and can only see before them, being prevented by the chains from turning round their heads. Above and behind them a fire is blazing at a distance, and between the fire and the prisoners there is a raised way; and you will see, if you look, a low wall built along the way, like the screen which marionette players have in front of them, over which they show the puppets.

And now look again, and see what will naturally follow if the prisoners are released and disabused of their error. At first, when any of them is liberated and compelled suddenly to stand up and turn his neck round and walk and look towards the light, he will suffer sharp pains; the glare will distress him, and he will be unable to see the realities of which in his former state he had seen the shadows; and then conceive some one saying to him, that what he saw before was an illusion, but that now, when he is approaching nearer to being and his eye is turned towards more real existence, he has a clearer vision, –what will be his reply? And you may further imagine that his instructor is pointing to the objects as they pass and requiring him to name them, –will he not be perplexed? Will he not fancy that the shadows which he formerly saw are truer than the objects which are now shown to him?"

(Plato)

Plato's Republic, book vii, 514a–c to 521a–e

[Plato's allegory about consciousness underpins Western philosophy. It also introduces a fundamental concept used by Christian theology to describe spiritual enlightenment.]

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allegoryallegory of the caveauthenticitycavechainClassicalcognitive immersionconsciousnesscopy • divine enlightenment • enlightenment • hierarchyimmersionmarionettemetaphysicsmimesisPlatoprisonerpuppetrealismrepresentationshadow • spiritual perception • Theory of Forms • transcendencetruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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