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Which clippings match 'Media Criticism' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 MARCH 2017

Documentary About Avant-Garde Pioneer Tony Conrad

"Experimental artist Tony Conrad is known for his innovative works in performance art, music, video, and fine art as well as his contribution to arts education as a longtime media professor at The University of Buffalo. A former Harvard math student himself, Conrad is widely considered to be a pioneer of minimalism, media criticism, drone pop, and noise music thanks to his lifelong dedication to deconstruction, abstraction, and self-empowerment."

(Erin Dennison, cinemathread)

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TAGS

abstractionAndy Warholaudio artavant-garde artistsavant-garde film makeravant-garde music • avant-garde pioneer • deconstructiondrone music • drone pop • experiential musicFaust (band)filmmaker • German counterculture • influential artists • Jon Cale • media criticismminimalismNew York City • noise music • Outside the Dream Syndicate (1973) • pioneering filmmaker • pioneering musician • psychoactive consequences of repetition • repeating patternrepetition • sequential repetition • structural film • structural filmmaking • The Flicker (1966) • Tony Conrad • Tyler Hubby • Velvet Underground

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Decoding BMW's You Know You Are Not The First

"The young woman's flawless skin is emphasizing the societal view of how perfection is what is considered beautiful and ideal. Her skin doesn't have a single blemish bruise, bump, or scar on it. Her makeup is very subtle and her cheeks have a slight rosy glow to them, giving her a very youthful appearance. The lack of jewelry is also making her look younger and more innocent and it is putting the focus solely on her bare flawless skin, this flawlessness is likely representing what one would get if they purchase one of their premium selection used BMW's, spotlessness in paint and interior.

Although BMW engages this image of innocence and flawlessness, there also appears to be a significant sexual message in this ad because the initial 'Innocent' image dissolves as you skim down the ad and see how the young woman's eye contact is directly with the camera, and it looks as if she is looking right into your eyes with a seductive expression. Her mouth also get a lot of attention as it appears to be slightly open, drawing your attention right to her full lips, 'open lips are used to suggest sexual excitement or passion'"

(Sonia Sidhu, 10 June 2012)

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TAGS

2008advertising campaignArthur Berger • atypical • blondeBMWbranded commodities • car company • constructed meaningcultural normsdepictions of womeneye contact • flawlessness • Germanglobalisation of aspirationGreece • hair colour • innocenceinterpretation • media analysis • media criticismmedia textmouth • olive skin • paradigmatic analysis • partially unclothedperfection • print advertisement • seduction • semiotic approach • semioticssex objectsexual agency • sexual excitement • signification • skin tone • suggestive narratives • syntagmatic analysis • textual analysis • used car • virginity • visual symbolism • young woman • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2012

What is the Liverpool Care Pathway?

"The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a scheme that is intended to improve the quality of care in the final hours or days of a patient's life, and to ensure a peaceful and comfortable death. It aims to guide doctors, nurses and other health workers looking after someone who is dying on issues such as the appropriate time to remove tubes providing food and fluid, or when to stop medication.

However, its use for some has become controversial, with relatives reportedly claiming it has been used without consent, and some saying it is used inappropriately.

This criticism and the media emphasis on the supposed controversy is puzzling, as the LCP has been standard practice in most hospitals for a number of years. The LCP has also received recognition on both a national and international level as an example of good practice.

As a GP put it in the British Medical Journal, the LCP 'has transformed end of life care from an undignified, painful experience into a peaceful, dignified death at home'"

(NHS Choices, UK)

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TAGS

1990s • advanced illness • British Medical Journal • care • comfortable death • consent • controversydeath • death pathway • diedignitydyingemotional needsend of life • end of life care • end-of-life careeuthanasiagood practiceGPguide • health workers • healthcare • hospice • hospital • LCP (acronym) • life • Liverpool Care Pathway • Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute • media criticism • medication • multidisciplinary approach • National Health Service • NHS • palliative care • patientpatient care • peaceful • physical needs • plan of care • prolonging life • public health • quality of care • relieve suffering • Royal Liverpool University Hospital • social needs • spiritual needs • suffering • terminally ill • UK • undignified

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JUNE 2009

New Media vs Old Media: Iranian Protests

"On Saturday June 13th, as protests began to flare on streets across Iran, 10.5m American TV–viewers naturally turned to CNN [...] Unfortunately, instead of protests many of them saw CNN's veteran, Larry King, interviewing burly motorcycle–builders. [...] [Yet,] thanks to the internet, dedicated news–watchers knew what they were missing. Twitter and YouTube carried a stream of reports, pictures and film from Iran's streets. The internet also facilitated media criticism. [...] A typical post: 'Iran went to hell. Media went to bed.'

[...] By June 16th Americans were getting decent reports, and even Mr King was paying attention to the story. [...] Meanwhile the much–ballyhooed Twitter swiftly degraded into pointlessness. [...] Even at its best the site gave a partial, one–sided view of events. Both Twitter and YouTube are hobbled as sources of news by their clumsy search engines.

Much more impressive were the desk–bound bloggers. Nico Pitney of the Huffington Post, Andrew Sullivan of the Atlantic and Robert Mackey of the New York Times waded into a morass of information and pulled out the most useful bits. Their websites turned into a mish–mash of tweets, psephological studies, videos and links to newspaper and television reports. It was not pretty, and some of it turned out to be inaccurate. But it was by far the most comprehensive coverage available in English. The winner of the Iranian protests was neither old media nor new media, but a hybrid of the two."
(The Economist, 18th June 2008)

TAGS

blogbloggingcitizen journalismCNNFacebookHuffington PostIran • Larry King • mediamedia criticismnew medianewsold mediapro-sumerprosumerprotestTwitterYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Adina Huma
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