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Which clippings match 'Dating' keyword pg.1 of 2
01 JANUARY 2014

Tinder: swiping yes to intimate invitations from relative strangers

"Tinder uses your existing social networking data from Facebook to locate people in the immediate vicinity, tell you a bit about them, whether you have any friends in common and (most importantly) show you a pic.

It has slimmed down the emotional, cognitive and financial investment required by the virtual dating process to one simple question: 'Do I want to do you?' What more modern way to make that most basic binary decision of whether you want to shag someone than a game of real–world 'Hot or Not'?

Social media has made us expert first–daters, well–versed in smalltalk and over–sharing with strangers. The quick follow–though from swipe to sex is similarly instinctive for a generation with an appetite for immediacy."

(Caroline Kent, 19 Sep 2013)

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automatic predictions • binary decision • casual sexcommodifying myselfcomparison site • compass • cross-context sharingdatadata matchingdatingFacebook • friends in common • hot or not • identity performance • immediate vicinity • iPhonelikedlikeslocation-basedlocation-based social networkingmobile appnormalising over-sharingonline datingonline profilesoversharingpersonal brandingproximityrecommendation platformself-disclosure • shag • shared friends • small talksocial mediasocial networkingspectacular societyswipingTinder (app)user data • vicinity • virtual dating

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2011

Cloud-based facial recognition services rely on finding publicly available pictures of you online

"With Carnegie Mellon's cloud–centric new mobile app, the process of matching a casual snapshot with a person's online identity takes less than a minute. Tools like PittPatt and other cloud–based facial recognition services rely on finding publicly available pictures of you online, whether it's a profile image for social networks like Facebook and Google Plus or from something more official from a company website or a college athletic portrait. In their most recent round of facial recognition studies, researchers at Carnegie Mellon were able to not only match unidentified profile photos from a dating website (where the vast majority of users operate pseudonymously) with positively identified Facebook photos, but also match pedestrians on a North American college campus with their online identities.

The repercussions of these studies go far beyond putting a name with a face; researchers Alessandro Acquisti, Ralph Gross, and Fred Stutzman anticipate that such technology represents a leap forward in the convergence of offline and online data and an advancement of the 'augmented reality' of complementary lives. With the use of publicly available Web 2.0 data, the researchers can potentially go from a snapshot to a Social Security number in a matter of minutes."

(Jared Keller, 29 September 2011, The Atlantic Magazine)

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augmented realityCarnegie Mellon Universitycloud computing • college campus • convergencecross-context sharingdating • dating website • face perceptionface recognitionFacebook • Facebook photos • facial recognition services • facial recognition studies • Google Plusidentificationidentifyidentitymatchmobile app • offline data • online data • online dating • online identities • online identityonline profiles • PittPatt • portraitprofile image • profile photo • pseudonym • pseudonymously • publicly available • publicly available pictures • snapshotsocial networks • Social Security number • technology innovation • unidentified • visual identityWeb 2.0 • Web 2.0 data

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 FEBRUARY 2010

Skout brings location-based dating to the iPhone

"There are some who view any kind of location–based social networking as creepy. But there are others who see it as the key ingredient to move online social networks into the real world. And one type of network in particular could lead the way: Dating sites. At least, that's what Skout is hoping for with its new iPhone application.

Set to be unveiled this week at the iDate conference in Miami, Skout claims to be the first online dating site with a native iPhone app. That's not entirely true – there are others like Dating DNA – but Skout could prove more interesting due to its emphasis on location and compatibility with other mobile devices.

If you've used any other location–based social networking apps on the iPhone like Loopt or Brightkite, Skout is similar, except that its sole emphasis is on helping you find people to date. After loading the app, you can see others around you who are also running it. If you spot someone who you think you might be compatible with, you can click on their picture to find out more about them, see a stream of their recent activity on the site (like the Facebook News Feed or Wall), look at pictures and comment on posted items, and even chat with them."

(MG Siegler, 21 January 2009, VentureBeat)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JULY 2009

Before online dating there was video dating...

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1980sbachelor • blast from the past • blind date • cringeworthy • cultural normsdating • dating video • depictions of mendisclosuregender stereotypesidentity performanceimpression managementmatchmakingmeeting peopleonline datingpersonal identitypersonal informationprofile imageretro cheesinessromantic relationshipsself-advocacyself-consciousself-disclosure • self-image • self-perception • self-promotion • video dating • video mate • wishes and needs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JUNE 2009

Presentations of Self on an Internet Dating Site

"This paper considers the presentation of self on an internet dating site. Thirty men and 30 women were interviewed about their online dating experiences. They were asked about how they constructed their profiles and how they viewed other individuals' profiles. Which types of presentations of self led to more successful offline romantic relationships were also investigated. Additionally, gender differences were examined. In line with previous research on presentation of self online, individuals were quite strategic in their online presentations. However, important differences between initiating a relationship on an internet dating site and other spaces (online and offline) included the type of self disclosed as well as the depth of breadth of information individuals self–disclosed about themselves before any one–on–one conversations took place."
(Monica T. Whitty)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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