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Which clippings match 'Department For Culture Media And Sport (DCMS)' keyword pg.1 of 2
19 DECEMBER 2013

UK Department for Business, Innovation & Skills

"The Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) is the department for economic growth. The department invests in skills and education to promote trade, boost innovation and help people to start and grow a business. BIS also protects consumers and reduces the impact of regulation."

(GOV.UK)

1

TAGS

2009 • British businesses • consumer law • Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) • Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS)Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) • Department for Innovation Universities and Skills (DIUS) • economic growth • employment market • flexible working • further educationgovernment policy • grow a business • higher educationinnovation • Manufacturing Advisory Service (MAS) • researchscience research • shared parental leave • skills and education • UKUK Government

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

Consultation to reclassify and measure the UK Creative Industries

"The purpose of this consultation is to update the DCMS Creative Industries classification and we are inviting input from interested parties. We have been engaging with industry and partner organisations over potential changes via a Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council and are now at a point where we would like to go out to consultation and seek wider views.

We have been working with partners (NESTA, Creative Skillset and Creative and Cultural Skills), to review and update the classification used in the DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates (CIEE). We intend to use this review 'Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries', referenced below, as an objective starting point to suggest which occupations and industries should be included in the updated DCMS classification.

The review uses the idea of 'creative intensity' (the proportion of people doing creative jobs within each industry) to suggest which industries should be included. If the proportion of people doing creative jobs in a particular industry is substantial, above a 30% threshold, the industries are candidates for inclusion within the Creative Industries classification.

Similar to the outlook in our current Creative Industries Economic Estimates, the 'creative intensity' approach focuses on industries where the creative activity happens. The intention is to produce a classification which provides direct estimates of employment and the contribution to the economy, with no double counting – rather than attempting to capture all activity further down the value chain, for example, retail activities. The classification generated in this way can be used as a starting point for indirect estimates which include wider economic effects along the supply chain.

Any approach has data and methods constraints, which may affect some industries more than others. These limitations are reflected in the consultation and consultees are invited to suggest alternatives, supported by evidence–based argument. Weaknesses in the underlying classifications and data used to construct these estimates, which are identified by users, will be fed–back to the organisations which set these standards and provide these data so that we can influence longer–term improvements."

(Department for Culture, Media & Sport, 19 April 2013)

TAGS

2013 • CIEE • classificationclassification scheme • Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries • contribution to the economy • creative activity • Creative and Cultural Skills • creative industries • Creative Industries classification • Creative Industries Economic Estimates • creative intensity • creative jobs • creative occupations • Creative Skillset • data constraints • DCMS • DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates • Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) • economic effects • estimate • estimation • evidence-based argument • government consultation • longer-term improvements • measurement • methods constraints • NESTAproposals • proposed changes • public consultationreview • SOC • Standard Occupational Classification • supply chain • Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council • UKUK Governmentvalue chain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 SEPTEMBER 2009

Digital Britain: Media today is participative, interactive, equal and many-to-many

"This will represent a significant change to the old analogue models of distribution, of monetisation and of participation. Media today is participative, interactive, equal and many–to–many. Where traditionally innovation and creativity was largely the domain of specialist teams in large organisations, today there is a creative revolution which is rooted in the opportunities afforded by connectivity. There is a significant opportunity to take the success of our creative industries into this interactive and participative world."
(Digital Britain: Final Report, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, June 2009, UK)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JUNE 2009

Simon Roodhouse gauges the [UK] government's creative industries IQ Magazine : Spring 2008

"Stimulated by the 'New Labour' government in the 1990s, the economic role and function of the UK's creative industries aroused international interest. Chris Smith, Britain's New Labour Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, confirmed early in his ministry that the creative industries were a growth sector of the UK economy, saying 'It is incumbent on the government, in partnership with industry, to take active steps to promote economic growth in the creative and cultural sector. If we do not do so, then others will reap stressing efficiency, effectiveness, value for money, and market forces. Smith reinforces this interpretation: 'ensuring that the full economic and employment impact of the whole range of creative industries is acknowledged and assisted by government'. (Smith 1998)

The DCMS's interest and engagement with the creative industries, through the establishment of the Creative Industries Task Force (CITF), chaired by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, cannot be seen as anything other than a direct engagement by the generation and exploitation of intellectual property'. (Creative Industries Task Force 1998)

The sectors identified within this framework are: 'advertising, architecture, the art and antiques market, crafts, design, designer fashion, film, interactive leisure software, music, the performing arts, publishing, software, television and radio'. (Creative Industries Task Force 1998)"
(Professor Simon Roodhouse, 2008)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JUNE 2009

Creative Industries Mapping Document(s) 1998

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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