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Which clippings match 'Mozilla' keyword pg.1 of 2
05 FEBRUARY 2016

The Nesta Digital Makers programme

"Digital technologies touch every aspect of life and business – but most people just use them and relatively few create them. We want to mobilise a generation of young people with the drive, confidence and know-how to understand how technology works and make their own new technology – whether websites, apps, hardware, games or innovations we haven't yet imagined."

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21st century literaciesAutodeskBBC Make It DigitalBBC micro:bitcode clubdesign and technologydigital fabricationdigital literacies • digital makers • digital making • digital making club • digital making community • digital making event • digital making kit • digital making opportunities • digital making workshop • digital skillsdigital skills for the futuredigital technologiesengineering and designEric Schmidt • fundamental literacy • iRights • know-how • making and sharing • MozillaNESTANext Gen. report • Nominet Trust • Scottish Government • technology education • Technopop • tools for change • UK • understand how technology works • young people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 NOVEMBER 2013

Mozilla Webmaker: Popcorn Maker

"Popcorn Maker helps you easily remix web video, audio and images into cool mashups that you can embed on other websites. Drag and drop content from the web, then add your own comments and links –all within your browser. Popcorn Maker videos are dynamic, full of links and unique with every view."

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authoring toolconsumer co-creationcontent integrationcultural democracydigital eradigital media creationdigital media designmedia amalgamationMozilla • Mozilla Persona • Mozilla Webmaker • multimediamultimedia authoring toolpopcorn • Popcorn Maker (tool) • remixabilitySoundCloud • timeline metaphor • video bloggingvideo creationvideo editingvideo mixingvideo on the webvideo publishingvideo software • video timeline • VimeoYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Rob Canning
11 FEBRUARY 2012

The Confluence of Digital Journalism and Digital Humanities

"I've increasingly felt that digital journalism and digital humanities are kindred spirits, and that more commerce between the two could be mutually beneficial. That sentiment was confirmed by the extremely positive reaction on Twitter to a brief comment I made on the launch of Knight–Mozilla OpenNews, including from Jon Christensen (of the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford, and formerly a journalist), Shana Kimball (MPublishing, University of Michigan), Tim Carmody (Wired), and Jenna Wortham (New York Times).

Here's an outline of some of the main areas where digital journalism and digital humanities could profitably collaborate. It's remarkable, upon reflection, how much overlap there now is, and I suspect these areas will only grow in common importance."

(Dan Cohen's Digital Humanities Blog)

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academic disciplinesarchive • archivists • audiencebig data • blog posts • common platforms • common tools • communication platformconfluence • content management systems • convergencecrowdsourcingcultural technologyDan Cohen • data standards • developersdigital humanitiesdigital journalismdigital media • digital research • disciplinary fields • DocumentCloud • Drupal • high-quality writing • historical archivesinfrastructureJenna Wortham • Jon Christensen • journalism • Kindle Singles • Knight Foundation • Knight-Mozilla OpenNews • librarians • long-form journalism • Mozilla • MPublishing • museum professionals • New York Times • news organisations • novel functionality • Omeka • open source softwareopen web • OpenNews • platformsprimary sources • pro-am • Shana Kimball • short-form scholarship • social mediasoftware developersStanford University • techies • technologists • Tim Carmody • TwitterUniversity of Michiganweb standardsWired (magazine)WordPress • writers and researchers • Zotero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JANUARY 2012

Brand Toolkit: Firefox Web Browser

"Here is your guide to all things Firefox, the flagship brand in the Mozilla universe. It's full of guidelines, examples and tips to help you create websites and communications that are on brand and on style, both online and off.

The Firefox brand is a living thing. It grows, changes and adapts. So we want you to have easy access to the latest and greatest out there. And lo we created this toolkit. And it was good."

(Mozilla, 2012)

Fig.1 Mozilla's unabashedly self–promoting "A Different Kind of Browser" clip.

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brand • brand toolkit • brandingbrowserFirefox • Firefox Web Browser • interdisciplinaryMozillanon-profitopen sourceownershipproprietarystyle guidetechnologytechnology innovationvalueswebweb browser

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2011

Video for Wikipedia: Guide to Best Practices

"This new effort takes advantage of a movement toward open video – a movement that has its roots in the free software movement that is largely powering the web today and which, through companies such as Apache, IBM, Mozilla, Oracle and Red Hat, has resulted in trillions of dollars of value creation for the stakeholders involved. The open or open–source video movement recognizes the contributions from, but also the limitations inherent in, the video work of industry leaders such as Adobe, Apple, and Microsoft. Flash, Quicktime, Windows Media and Silverlight are handsome technologies. But they have been developed and controlled by commercial companies that often protect themselves against innovations by outside coders, designers, developers, programmers – technologists, lawyers, producers, and educators keen to move away from proprietary solutions that are delivered for the benefit of shareholders first and the billions of everyday people who connect via the web a pale second.

The open video movement recognizes the importance of rights and licensing strategies designed to create profit or serve national interests, but it is critical of systems that prohibit access to film and sound assets becoming part of our collective audiovisual canon. Many film and sound resources digitized for preservation, for example, do not appear online because of dated copyright rules; and some of the great investments (millions of dollars in fact) by, for example, the U.K. government in film and sound resource digitization result in materials being put online only behind educational and national paywalls that keep students in Nairobi and Nashville from using London–based resources in their work.

Enabling video to catch up to the open–source movement on the web goes to the heart of our efforts to improve our understanding of the world. The central technologies of the web – HTML, HTTP, and TCP/IP – are open for all to build upon and improve, and video's future should be similarly unobstructed."

(Peter B. Kaufman, 2010)

Fig.1 Kid Kameleon, CC BY SA NC

2). Video for Wikipedia and the Open Web October 2010 An Intelligent Television White Paper PETER B. KAUFMAN INTELLIGENT TELEVISION WWW.INTELLIGENTTELEVISION.COM THE OPEN VIDEO ALLIANCE Version 1.0

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2010AdobeAdobe FlashApache Software Foundation (ASF)AppleaudiovisualBBC archiveBritish Film InstituteBritish Governmentcontent rightscopyrightcopyright rulesdigitisation • educational paywalls • film resources • free software movement • HTML • HTTP • IBMinnovationLibrary of Congress • licensing strategies • media resources • MicrosoftMITMozillaNairobi • Nashville • national paywalls • open sourceopen video • open-source movement • open-source video movement • Oracle Corporation • ownership • paywall • preservation • proprietary solutions • proprietary technologiesQuickTime • Red Hat (Linux) • remix cultureSilverlightsound resources • U.S. National Archives • value creationWikipedia • Windows Media • Yale University

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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