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Which clippings match 'Contraption' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 MARCH 2016

Mécaniques Discursives

Mécaniques Discursives at Némo / Biennale Internationale des Arts Numériques Centquatre / Paris / F.

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2Danimated illustrationblack and whitecontraptioncut-out illustration • Frederic Penelle • kinetic art • machinerie absurde • meta-maticsplayful workprojection workswoodcut animation • Yannick Jacquet

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2014

Jean Tinguely: Art, Machines and Motion

"Jean Tinguely exhibited in a show titled 'Art, Machines and Motion' at the Kaplan Gallery, London, in November 1959. In conjunction with that exhibition, Tinguely held a conference and performance at the Institute of Contemporary Art on November 16 titled 'Static, Static, Static! Be Static!' During the event, 1.5 km of paper drawn by two cyclists on his meta–matic bicycle were spread through the audience while Tinguely read his theory of movement and machines simultaneously heard on radio in Paris."

(Rosemary O'Neill, p.159)

Rosemary O'Neill (2011). Total Art and Fluxus in Nice. "Art and Visual Culture on the French Riviera, 1956–1971: The Ecole De Nice", Ashgate Publishing Limited.

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1959abstract artanarchicart exhibition • Art Machines and Motion (exhibition) • auto-generateavant-garde artistsbicycleBritish Pathecontraptiondo-it-yourself • Ewan Phillips • generative artgenerative compositional techniqueInstitute of Contemporary Artsinteractive artironicJean Tinguely • Kaplan Gallery • kinetic sculptureLondonmachine aestheticmachinesmechanical device • meta-matic bicycle • meta-maticsmid 20th-centurymotion • movement and machines • moving machinesnewsreel • Nouveau Realistes • paperParisplayfulradiorobot artrobotised assemblagessculptorsculpture • speed sculpture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2013

GoldieBlox uses gender politics to target consumers

"One of the most anti–feminist songs of the 1980s, 'Girls' by the Beastie Boys, is recast as an empowering theme for young women in a new toy ad looking to break gender stereotypes.

The spot is a holiday promotion for GoldieBlox, a construction–themed board game that nearly doubled its Kickstarter goal in 2012. Game developer Debbie Sterling designed GoldieBlox to combine young girls' love of reading and characters with the engineering themes of toys typically more popular with boys, like Legos and erector sets. To that end, the ad features a massive Rube Goldberg scenario, designed by OK Go contraption collaborator Brett Doar. As the machine's workings unravel, the girls sing modified Beastie Boys lyrics: 'It's time to change/We deserve to see a range/'Cause all our toys look just the same/And we would like to use our brains.'"

(David Griner, 19 November 2013, Adweek)

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2012adAdweekBeastie Boys • board game • Brett Doar • contraptionculture of pretty • Debbie Sterling • emotive manipulationempowerment themeengineering • engineering themes • feminist themesgender performance culturegender stereotypesgirl powergirls • GoldieBlox • interactive books • inventive power • Kickstarter • love of reading • magical contraption • OK Go • pink and prettyrepresentation of womenRube Goldberg machinetoy • toy company • young girlyoung women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2012

The Bruce Lacey Experience: rich and diverse artistic production

"Bruce Lacey (born 1927) is one of Britain's great visionary artists. His lifetime pursuit of eccentric 'making and doing' has been a cathartic working–through of his experiences. This survey of a rich and diverse artistic production is a celebration of both his vibrant life (which includes working with Spike Milligan, The Beatles and Ken Russell) and his art which reveals telling links with the visual culture of the last 60 years. Co–curated by artist Jeremy Deller and art historian Professor David Alan Mellor, the exhibition charts Lacey's artistic development in a career encompassing painting, sculpture, robotised assemblages, theatrical performances and installations, as well as community arts and ritual action performances."

(Camden Arts Centre, 2012)

Fig.1 "Bruce Lacey Final H264 Widescreen 960x540" [Interview for The Bruce Lacey Experience, 7 July 2012 – 16 September 2012, Camden Arts Centre]

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2012animated modelsart exhibitionassemblageautomate • Bruce Lacey • Camden Arts Centrecircuscontraptioncontraptionscybernetic art • David Alan Mellor • deviceeccentric • electric actors • electronic artengineering • George Harrison • ingenuityJeremy Deller • Jill Bruce • Ken Russellkinetic artkinetic automaton • ley line • making and doing • making something happen • New Realism • outrageous stunts • performance career • personal psychotherapy • Peter Sellers • ritual action performance • robotroboticrobotic artrobotised assemblagesRoyal College of ArtSpike MilliganstuntThe Beatles • theatrical performances • UK • variety theatre • visionary artist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2008

From Machines That 'Work' on You to Machines That You 'Work' on

"The Swedish physician Gustav Zander's institute in Stockholm, founded in the late nineteenth century and stocked with twenty–seven of his custom–built machines, was the first "gym" in the sense that we know the word today. His mechanical horse was an early version of the Stairmaster, a contraption for cardiovascular fitness designed to imitate a "natural" activity. His stomach–punching apparatus evokes contemporary "ab–crunching" machines. What makes Zander so important, for anyone trying to trace the Cybex family tree, is what happened when his machines, created in a European cultural context, immigrated to the US in the early twentieth century. They are prototypes of the workout equipment now ubiquitous in American life.
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By the early twentieth century, extensive collections of Zander machines could be found at elite health spas such as Homestead in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and at private institutes such as the one Zander set up near Central Park in New York. Access to these health machines was a mark of status at the turn of the century. Health spas and gymnasia were not subsidised by the state as they were in Sweden, and the American working class would not have been able to afford the fees required to receive Zander treatments. Nor were the working class thought to need such treatments; their "hearty" bodies were not yet impaired by the sedentary habits of affluent modern life. In mechanised workouts, white–collar Americans pumped up their own superiority. By declaring that "fitness" equalled a perfectly balanced physique, rather than the ability to perform actual physical tasks, body power was shifted from labourers to loungers."

(Carolyn de la Peña, 2008, Cabinet Magazine)

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2008apparatusbodycontraptioncorporeal • Cybex • exercise apparatusexercise machine • fitness • fitness equipmentgymgymnasiumhealthideal formkeep fit machinerymassage away lumps and bumpsmechanicalphysiologyphysique • spa • Swedentoning machinestreatment • workout • workout equipment • Zander

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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