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Which clippings match 'Interactive Exhibit' keyword pg.1 of 1
31 OCTOBER 2013

Squidsoup's Living Timeline at Amsterdam's Cinekid Festival

"We are delighted to be part of this year's Cinekid Festival (see http://www.cinekid.nl/ for more info) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In among a host of awesome content and highly engaging interactive kid–oriented experiences, we have installed our Living Timeline project. It feels great to give the piece its first international audience, and to be in this cool exhibition."

(Squidsoup)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

Who Am I? permanent exhibition at the London Science Museum

"The Science Museum in London has just undertaken a refresh of its Who am I? gallery, which is dedicated to the genetics, identity and brain science.

The revamped exhibit updates both the science and the design of the 10–year–old gallery, bringing it bang up to date with the very latest advances in genetic research. 'There's been so many advances, we needed to gave another look at the content', Jenny Wong, a content developer at the museum and one of the creators of the gallery, told me.'"

(Nate Lanxon, 25 June 2010)

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TAGS

20002010 • access-for-all • AllofUs • Anthony Gormley • autism • bang up to date • Blob Dylan • brain science • Casson Mann • Disability Discrimination Act • DNA • Dryden Goodwin • epilepsy • genetic researchgenetics • Graphic Thought Facility • hippocampus • histological sections • human brain • identityindividual identityinteractive exhibitinteractive table • interchangeable components • interconnected installation • Jenny Wong • Jochem Faudet • memory • memory gallery • neurology • permanent exhibition • personal identity • revamp • Revital CohenScience Museum of London • self-discovery • silicon character • South KensingtonWellcome Trust • Who Am I

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 SEPTEMBER 2008

Urbis: capturing visitors through CCTV surveillance

"These themes are reflected in the variety of interactive exhibits on display, the centre piece of which is a room containing cctv cameras where one can see oneself being filmed and where, at a console, one can then produce one's identity card, with basic information about oneself, including likes and dislikes. These can then be stuck on the outside wall of the room and can be read by other visitors. This appears to be one of the most popular exhibits and an example of an interactive display that works. The reason for this success are that it affords absorption or immersion in an activity in ways that most of the other exhibits do not. It makes no sense here just to look, rather one needs to sit down and get involved in a hands on experience so that one can present a snapshot of oneself to others. There is often a queue to use the computers and after a year the wall outside for sticking the id cards on is filling up. Information on the id cards includes a photo taken by the cctv cameras, first name, place of residence and likes and dislikes, these mostly include foods, football teams, family members, pets and celebrities often in both categories."

(Kevin Hetherington, 2004 p.23)

Hetherington, Kevin. 1997 "The Badlands of Modernity: Heterotopia and Social Ordering", London, UK: Routledge.

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TAGS

big brotherCCTVdecal • identity cards • interactive exhibitKevin HetheringtonManchester • Millennium Quarter Trust • museummuseum of contemporary culture • photo id • photo identification • photoboothpublic gallerystickersurveillancetoyUK • Urbis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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