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20 JANUARY 2014

What industry say fusion skills really are?

Friday 31st January 2014 at the London Knowledge Lab: Presentations 1:30–2:30; Demos 2:30–3:30; Discussion and debate: 3:30–4:30.

"Digital media is now ubiquitous and embedded all around us even when we are not connected via our range of devices, so its no surprise that the government sees the creative industries as a priority area for growth. One factor key to its success is that of the so–called 'Fusion Skills': mixes of creative media, STEM and enterprise. The fusion of these three elements is an increasing demand from industry voices and seen as an answer to new digital innovation. In 2012, The Creative Industries Council (that reports to two ministers of state) called Fusion 'the new skills imperative' and one of eight challenges that need to be addressed in order to unlock growth. This 'what the research says' event attempts to unpack and explore Fusion in theory and practice, hearing from industry and educators. It's said that Higher Education faculty and discipline silos necessitate against fusion learning and teaching. ...

How do we co–opt students who are resistant to such abstract ideas, preferring outdated career caricatures from sources of variable quality? Where should interventions be– secondary school? Postgraduate? Is there hard evidence that Fusion skills are needed?"

(London Knowledge Lab)

TAGS

2014arts and humanities • career charicatures • computer sciencecreative economycreative industries • Creative Industries Council • creative media • creative problem solving skills • current thinking • digital mediadigital technology • disciplinary silos • embeddedenterpriseenterprise and creativity • Fusion Challenge • fusion skill • fusion skills • industry voices • interdisciplinary approacheslearning and teaching • Learning Innovation Education • LKL Innovations • LondonLondon Knowledge LabNESTA • new digital innovation • priority area for growth • Saint John Walker • silosSTEM subjects • the new skills imperative • theory and practice • TransFusion Conference • ubiquitousUK • unlock growth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2013

Concurrent Engineering versus Sequential Engineering

"Sequential engineering, also known as serial engineering, is characterized by downstream departments supplying information to design only after a product has already been designed, verified and prototyped [1], in order to change what design engineering did wrong, or what could have been improved. In serial engineering, the various functions such as design, manufacturing, and customer service are separated. The information in serial engineering flows in succession from phase to phase. For example, the prototype model, verified by either simulation or prototyping or both, is reviewed for manufacturing, quality and service. Usually, some changes are suggested after the review. If the suggested changes in the design are made, there are increases in the cost and time to develop the product, resulting in delays in marketing the product. If the changes cannot be made because of market pressure to launch the product quickly, or the fact that the design is already behind schedule, then specialists in other functional areas or managers from manufacturing, quality, and service, among others, are informed of the impending problems. In sequential engineering a department starts working only when the preceding one has finished, and, once a department has finished working on a project, or part of a project, this is not planned to come back: information flow is only one way.

On the contrary, in CE all functional areas are integrated within the design process. In this case information continuously flows back and forth among all functions. During the design process CE draws on various disciplines to trade-off parameters such as manufacturability, testability and serviceability, along with customer performance, size, weight, and cost [1-2]. The decision making process in a CE environment differs from sequential engineering in that at every stage decisions are taken considering the constraints and the objectives of all stages of the product life cycle, thus taking at the product design level issues that are usually addressed much later, thus giving the possibility to achieve a better overall solution [2,3]. The integration of other functional areas within the design process helps to discover hard to solve problems at the design stage. Thus, when the final design is verified, it is already manufacturable, testable, serviceable, and of high quality. The most distinguishing feature of CE is the multidisciplinary, cross-functional team approach. Product development costs range between 5% and 15% of total costs, but decisions taken at this stage affect 60–95% of total costs [4]. Therefore it is at the product development stage that the most relevant savings can be achieved."

(Ecehan SofuoÄŸlu, 2011)

Ecehan SofuoÄŸlu (2011). "Different Approaches to Concurrent Engineering"

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TAGS

competitive capabilities • concurrent engineering (CE)cross-functional design teams • cross-functional team approach • decision making process • design engineeringdesign processdevelopment life cycle • downstream • engineering and manufacturing • functional areas • manufacturability • manufacturable • manufacturingmultidisciplinary teams • new product development • over-the-wall design processover-the-wall engineering • overall solution • product development • product development methods • product development stage • product-lifecycle • sequential engineering (SE) • sequential stages • serial engineering • serial prototyping • serviceability • serviceable • silos • successive phases • testability • testable

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2009

How social networks lead to innovation

"Technology has expanded our ability to communicate across geographic and social distance. "Global" is the word of the day. The limited scale of yesterday's organisations is today inefficient. We've removed layers of bureaucracy and laid in fast, flexible communication systems.

Leaders of large organisations inevitably talk about people and cultural issues when asked to describe the most difficult barriers to managing and co–ordinating communications.

We are capable of co–ordinating across scattered markets of human endeavour, but we are not yet competent in how to take advantage of this capability. This is because we continue to work in organisation silos and in the way we learned in long–established organisations."
(Ron Burt, 17 February 2008)

[Professor Ron Burt argues that social networks spanning the gaps in our existing social structure are key to innovation, and personal and commercial success.]

TAGS

boundarycommunication systemsenterpriseglobalinnovationknowledge transferNESTAnetwork • organisation silos • scattered markets • silossocial networkssocial structure • structural holes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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