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12 FEBRUARY 2013

UK Arts & Humanities Research Council: A Definition of Research

"research activities should primarily be concerned with research processes, rather than outputs. This definition is built around three key features and your proposal must fully address all of these in order to be considered eligible for support:

It must define a series of research questions, issues or problems that will be addressed in the course of the research. It must also define its aims and objectives in terms of seeking to enhance knowledge and understanding relating to the questions, issues or problems to be addressed

It must specify a research context for the questions, issues or problems to be addressed. You must specify why it is important that these particular questions, issues or problems should be addressed; what other research is being or has been conducted in this area; and what particular contribution this project will make to the advancement of creativity, insights, knowledge and understanding in this area

It must specify the research methods for addressing and answering the research questions, issues or problems. You must state how, in the course of the research project, you will seek to answer the questions, address the issues or solve the problems. You should also explain the rationale for your chosen research methods and why you think they provide the most appropriate means by which to address the research questions, issues or problems.

Our primary concern is to ensure that the research we fund addresses clearly–articulated research questions, issues or problems, set in a clear context of other research in that area, and using appropriate research methods and/or approaches.

The precise nature of the research questions, issues or problems, approaches to the research and outputs of the work may vary considerably, embracing basic, strategic and applied research. The research questions, issues, problems, methods and/or approaches may range from intellectual questions that require critical, historical or theoretical investigation, to practical issues or problems that require other approaches such as testing, prototyping, experimental development and evaluation. The outputs of the research may include, for example, monographs, editions or articles; electronic data, including sound or images; performances, films or broadcasts; or exhibitions. Teaching materials may also be an appropriate outcome from a research project provided that it fulfils the definition above.

The research should be conceived as broadly as possible and so consideration should also be given to the outcomes of, and audiences for, the research. The outcomes of the research may only benefit other researchers and influence future research, but consideration must be given to potential opportunities for the transfer of knowledge into new contexts where the research could have an impact.

Creative output can be produced, or practice undertaken, as an integral part of a research process as defined above. The Council would expect, however, this practice to be accompanied by some form of documentation of the research process, as well as some form of textual analysis or explanation to support its position and as a record of your critical reflection. Equally, creativity or practice may involve no such process at all, in which case it would be ineligible for funding from the Council."

(Arts and Humanities Research Council)

TAGS

academic research • accompanying documentation • advancement of creativity • AHRCapplied researchartwork and exegesisbasic researchclinical researchcontribution to knowledge • creative output • critical investigationcritical reflection • definition of research • experimental development • historical investigation • impact and engagement • knowledge and understandingknowledge transfer • new contexts • new insights • problem for action • problems to be addressed • prototyping • record and reflect • research activities • research aims and objectives • research context • research impactresearch methodsresearch outcomeresearch processesresearch projectresearch questions • strategic research • testingtextual analysis • theoretical investigation • transfer of knowledgeUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

The Digital Humanities Manifesto 2.0

"'Digital humanities is not a unified field but an array of convergent practices that explore a universe in which print is no longer the exclusive or the normative medium in which knowledge is produced and/or disseminated.'

Thus begins the Digital Humanities Manifesto a document originally authored by Todd Presner (UCLA) and Jeffrey Schnapp (Stanford), for the Mellon Seminars in Digital Humanities."

(David Green, 15 June 2009, Academic Commons)

TAGS

2009Academic Commons • array of convergent practices • convergent practices • digital humanities • Digital Humanities Manifesto • Jeffrey Schnapp • knowledge culture • knowledge dissemination • knowledge productionknowledge transfermanifesto • Mellon Seminars in Digital Humanities • Stanford University • Todd Presner • UCLA • unified field

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 NOVEMBER 2012

Organza: improving policy-making in the field of creative industries

"Organza aims at improving policy–making in the field of creative industries and to strengthen regional economies by developing and evaluating new policy instruments, sharing experiences between different European regions and medium–sized cities.

To achieve its objectives Organza brings together 13 partners with different models of policy development and which are at different stages of policy making. Since it is a new policy area, methodologies are to be developed to enable partners to compare and contrast the structure of creative industries and the supporting infrastructure within their regions and assess the effectiveness of the many initiatives that have been developed to support them. The information generated will be collated into a major database to facilitate the sharing of information. From this comprehensive collection of data, a limited set of practices is selected for transfer between cities and regions. Focusing on the three stages of the policy process (creation, piloting and implementation), the transfer of experience and good practice will be evaluated by the project partners and the experience widely shared."

(Organza)

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TAGS

20102012creative industries • creative industries infrastructure • creative industries practices • data collection • database of inspiring practices • ERDF Managing Authority • European Regional Development Fundgood practicegovernment policyinformation sharinginnovation • INTERREG IVC • Interregional Cooperation Programme INTERREG IVC • knowledge economyknowledge transfer • medium sized creative cities • new policy instruments • Organza (project) • policy creation • policy development • policy implementation • policy making • policy models • policy piloting • policy process • project partners • regional development • Regional Development Fund • regional economies • regional policy-makers • risk prevention • share insightssharing experiencesworking together

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2011

PhD pedagogy and the changing knowledge landscapes of universities

"At the level of form and content of the knowledge produced in postgraduates' work, the supervisor, whose intellectual roots are frequently based in a singular domain characterised by horizontal knowledge structures, must acquire principles that enable them to understand the students' research problems in terms of a vertical or hierarchical knowledge structure. For example, a student may wish to contribute to insights in the domain of social aspects of urban design. The supervisor, who may be a sociologist, must find a means of integrating insights from sociology with its own nuanced conceptual language, with discourses from design associated with user centred design principles, at a level that is sufficient to guide the student through the processes of integration and recontextualisation. Thus vertical knowledge structures need to be employed by both supervisor and student to address the weakening classifications between sociology and design. Further, however, the hidden aspect of pedagogy here is that the supervisor must have a sufficient understanding at a generic level of what is required for the development of knowledge through integration to provide the student with the tools to accomplish this with respect to their own specific topic area. This is an area that receives very little attention in any of the discourses or literature around what is required of supervisors, and is a key area for further research on postgraduate pedagogy."

(Barbara Adkins, 2009, QUT ePrints)

Adkins, Barbara A. (2009) PhD pedagogy and the changing knowledge landscapes of universities. Higher Education Research and Development Journal, 28(2), pp. 165–177.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2010

The Innovation Portal: supporting Scottish industry

"The purpose of the Innovation Portal is to promote and foster productive knowledge transfer between the Universities of Dundee and Abertay, the SCRI (Scottish Crop Research Institute) and Scottish industry. Its aim is to improve the competitiveness of local businesses by bringing together innovative companies with scientists, technologists and engineering experts keen to apply their expertise to the needs of industry."

(The Innovation Portal)

[1] Universities Scotland, 'Innovating our way out of recession'

TAGS

competitive advantagecompetitivenesseconomic recessioneconomyengineering • engineering experts • enterpriseexpertise • industry expertise • information resourceinnovation • Innovation Portal • innovative expertise • knowledge transferknowledge-based economylocal businessscientistsScotland • Scottish Crop Research Institute • Scottish industry • SCRI • SMEtechnologistsUniversities Scotland • University of Abertay • University of Dundee

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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