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12 MARCH 2015

Hugh Dubberly: Design the Future

"Hugh is the President of Dubberly Design and talented design planner and teacher. At Apple Computer in the late 80s and early 90s, Hugh managed cross-functional design teams and later managed creative services for the entire company. While at Apple, he co-created a technology-forecast film called 'Knowledge Navigator,' that presaged the appearance of the Internet in a portable digital device. While at Apple, he served at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena as the first and founding chairman of the computer graphics department.

Intrigued by what the publishing industry would look like on the Internet, he next became Director of Interface Design for Times Mirror. This led him to Netscape where he became Vice President of Design and managed groups responsible for the design, engineering, and production of Netscape's Web portal. Hugh graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in graphic design and earned an MFA in graphic design from Yale.

This lecture was held on Wednesday, October 3, 2012 at 4:30pm in 1305 Newell Simon Hall."

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TAGS

2012 • age of biology • Apple Computer • Art Center College of Design in Pasadena • Austin Henderson • biological model • boundary objectsCarnegie Mellon Universitycommunication systemsconcept map • concept mapping • conceptual model • continuous change • creative servicescross-functional design teamsdata modelling • data models • design of the system rather than the object • design planner • design the futureDesign the Future Lecture ProgrammeDonald Norman • Dubberly Design • Fred Murrell • George Lakoffgraphic designer • HCII • Hugh Dubberlyinterface design • James Griesemer • Jay Doblin • John Rheinfrank • Kevin KellyKnowledge Navigator (1988)lingua franca • manufacturing age • mechanistic modelmetaphors of realityNetscape • networked-services ecology • org chart • Pasadena • portable digital device • Rhode Island School of Designservice design • service designer • Susan Leigh Star • system image • technology forecasting • Times Mirror • VisiCalc • whole systems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 OCTOBER 2014

The Ulm School: designing the system rather than the object

"The Ulm School of Design was founded in 1953 by Inge Aicher–Scholl, Otl Aicher and Max Bill, with the main task of incorporate design into industry and to shape our material culture. In the post–war years, the process was marked by a crisis of values and resources, and this fact drove the Ulm School to re–think the meaning of creating forms in the contemporary world and to democratize the access to design. The exhibition explores the concept of 'system', related with a set of rationally components capable of generating an object, and also the systematic approach of the school, which included for the first time, the integration of science and art.

The importance of the Ulm School in the history of design comes from the strict methodology they imposed on project development. Focusing on an inter–disciplinary work and objective design analysis, it rejected design as an artistic activity and spread through industry to all walks of life. The school was recognized worldwide for its approach of focusing on the design of the system rather than the object."

(Ethel Baraona Pohl, 13 February 2012, Domus Magazine)

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TAGS

1953 • 1972 Munich Olympics • access to design • Bilbao metro • Braun KM2 Multiwerk • communication analysis • communication problems • communication systems • construction systems • contemporary world • Design Hub Barcelona • design methodologydesign of the system rather than the objectDieter Rams • domestic products • Domus (magazine) • elementary objects • flexible products • furniture systems • Hans Gugelot • Hans Roericht • Herbert Lindinger • Inge Aicher-Scholl • integration of science and art • interchangeable elements • interdisciplinary working • Konrad Wachsmann • Lufthansa • material cultureMax Billmechanisation • methodological analysis • new approach • Nick Roericht • Norman Foster • objective design analysis • Otl Aicherpost-war eraprefabricationproject developmentsemiotics • simple systems • systematic approach • systems in electronics • tablewareUlm School of DesignWilhelm Wagenfeld

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Meredith Davis: A Call to Action for Design Educators

"I believe that design education, at the most fundamental level, views complexity as a problem to be overcome through reductivist artifacts, not as an inevitable and pervasive attribute of life in the post–industrial community. So if the future is about an ever–expanding web of connectedness, how are we preparing students for meaningful work in this complex world? I'd like to suggest that we're not. Despite the obvious emotional impact of Glaser's poster, he belongs to a generation in which the goal of design was to make things simple. Negroponte, on the other hand, is a technologist for whom the design goal is to render the complex manageable and to make complicated things meaningful.

Almost everything about today's graphic design education is matched to Glaser's worldview. We structure both curricula and projects in craft–based progressions from simple to complex, from the abstract to the contextualized. In typography classes, for example, we begin with the letter, and then advance to the word, sentence, paragraph, and page. Sequences of typography courses are built on this simple to complex progression, when opening InDesign demands that students address the formal and interpretive issues of publication design simultaneously; how do you defer a discussion of leading, of column width, of the modernist preconceptions of software, of language? The only option is default, and what kind of typographic lesson is that?

The reality is that our strategy for teaching typography is residue from how students could comp type in predigital times; by drawing. It is the organizational structure for every type book since James Craig's 1970 Designing with Type, but it holds less relevance for what students need to know about communication in a digital world. Typography today is a complex relational system that depends on the interplay of formal, technological, linguistic, and cultural variables. Yet we persist in teaching this progression of scale, isolating such variables within their own distinct conceptual frameworks and rules.

The same strategy exists for how students progress in other studies of form. Foundation lessons begin with abstraction: point, line, and plane; color wheels; and paper–folding exercises. We defer discussions of meaning and context until later levels of the curriculum and beginning students learn these abstraction principles only through patterns in what makes their teachers smile. Nothing about these studies resembles what students know about in the real world, and as a colleague recently suggested, what the clients of design see in our work. So what if we begin with the familiar and complex?"

(Meredith Davis, 4 April 2008, AIGA Boston Presentation)

Presentation made at W/Here: Contesting Knowledge in the 21st Century, Emily Carr University of Art+Design, Vancouver, Canada, 7–9 December 2011.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 MAY 2011

ART-e-FACT : STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE / / an online magazine for contemporary art & culture

"In the digital age – in which power lies neither in institutions nor on the streets but on the Web, that is, in the communications system – we seek to exchange ideas about the questions of both culture and art, and of society at large and encourage possible answers."

(ART–e–FACT)

Fig.1 Egle Budvytyte 'The Story of The Fish In the Times of Science and Techno mythologies', Video, 09'06, Amsterdam, 2008

Impressum: ART–e–FACT : STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE / / an online magazine for contemporary art & culture ISSN 1845–5301

Publisher: Omnimedia d.o.o., Branimirova 57, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia, ph.+ 385 1 3636–830, + 385 98 350 860, e–mail: info@artefact.mi2.hr, For the publisher: Dalibor Martinis

Editors: Nada Beroš, Trudy Lane, Antonia Majača (editor–in–chief), Dalibor Martinis, Tihomir Milovac, Leila Topić

Guest editors: Žarko Paić, Marina Gržinić, Zoran Erić

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TAGS

activismappropriationart and cultureart projects • art-culture-technology • ART-e-FACT • artistic and cultural paradigms • borderlinebranded commoditiescapitalismcommunication systemscontemporary artconvergencecritical theorycritiqueCroatia • cultural consumption • digital agedigital culture • digital gadgets • disseminationexchange of ideas • geopolitically • global context • global cultural economy • global outreach • globalisation • globally accepted paradigms • gloc-art • glocalglocalization • glocalogue • local • local flavour • local habits • local tastes • localitymarketingmedia art • multinational companies • new medianew media technologiesonline magazinepower • predatory capitalism • questions of culture and art • representationresistancesocial change • strategies of resistance • technologytechnology reshaped by artists • technomythologies • theoreticians • transformationtransformed by technologyutopiavirtual realitywebZagreb

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2009

How social networks lead to innovation

"Technology has expanded our ability to communicate across geographic and social distance. "Global" is the word of the day. The limited scale of yesterday's organisations is today inefficient. We've removed layers of bureaucracy and laid in fast, flexible communication systems.

Leaders of large organisations inevitably talk about people and cultural issues when asked to describe the most difficult barriers to managing and co–ordinating communications.

We are capable of co–ordinating across scattered markets of human endeavour, but we are not yet competent in how to take advantage of this capability. This is because we continue to work in organisation silos and in the way we learned in long–established organisations."
(Ron Burt, 17 February 2008)

[Professor Ron Burt argues that social networks spanning the gaps in our existing social structure are key to innovation, and personal and commercial success.]

TAGS

boundarycommunication systemsenterpriseglobalinnovationknowledge transferNESTAnetwork • organisation silos • scattered markets • silossocial networkssocial structure • structural holes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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