Not Signed-In
Which clippings match '1950s' keyword pg.1 of 5
15 MARCH 2015

Richard Hamilton: British Pop Art Pioneer

"Hamilton was a member of the Independent Group, formed in the 1950s by a group of artists and writers at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, whose symposiums contributed to the development of Pop art in Britain. He was one of the prime practitioners of the critic Lawrence Alloway's theory of a 'fine/pop art continuum'. Hamilton interpreted this as meaning that 'all art is equal - there was no hierarchy of value. Elvis was to one side of a long line while Picasso was strung out on the other side ... TV is neither less nor more legitimate an influence than, for example, is New York Abstract Expressionism' (Hamilton, p.31)."

(Terry Riggs, December 1997, Tate)

Richard Hamilton (1956). 'Just what is it that makes today's homes so different, so appealing?'

1

TAGS

1950s19561960sAllen JonesAndy Warhol • Antony Donaldson • Brigitte Bardot • British artist • Clive Barker • Colin Self • collagecollage artDamien HirstDavid Hockney • Derek Boshier • Eduardo Paolozzi • effervescent • ephemera of popular culture • Frank Auerback • Galina Golikova • gaudy • Gerald Laing • influential creators • international art movement • James Rosenquist • Jan Howarth • Jann Haworth • Joe Tilson • Ken Russell • Lawrence Alloway • Leon Kossoff • low cost • Marcel Duchampmass audience • mass produced • Nicholas Monro • Patrick Caulfield • Pauline Boty • Peter Blake • Peter Philips • Peter Phillipspop art • pop art movement • popular art • popular culture • proto-pop art • rebellious artRene MagritteRichard Hamilton • Richard Smith • Robert Indiana • Ronald Brooks Kitaj • Roy Lichtenstein • short term solution • silkscreen • transient

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2014

Let's stop pretending that theatre can't be captured on screen

"I recall a Punch cartoon of the late 1950s showing two moviegoers gazing in astonishment at the latest 3D spectacle. 'Next thing,' one of them remarked, 'they'll be having real people up there.' But we are now in an era when the gap between film and theatre, thanks to sophisticated technology, is constantly narrowing. I went this week to a preview of Digital Theatre's screen version of Richard Eyre's Almeida production of Ibsen's Ghosts: I can only say that it offered an experience comparable to that I had in the theatre. I'd also recommend everyone to see it when it's shown in 200 cinemas across the UK and Ireland on 26 June.

It's not quite the same as National Theatre Live, where cinemagoers vicariously attend a single performance. Digital's Ghosts, I'm told, was shot over three successive evenings during the show's run at the Trafalgar Studios. But, whatever the process, the result is to democratise theatre. It's not just that the performance can be seen worldwide. The key point is that everyone now has the best seat in the house."

(Michael Billington, 18 June 2014)

1
2

TAGS

1950s20143D effect • acclaimed productions • Almeida Theatre • astonishment • captured on screen • digital theatre • Digital Theatre Ltd • embodied experience • filmed production • Ghosts (Henrik Ibsen) • global online audience • Henrik Ibsen • high-definition technology • in the round • live performance captured authentically onscreen • live performance on cinema screens • live theatre • moviegoer • multiple camera angles • National Theatre Live • Punch (cartoon)real people • Richard Eyre • screen version • sophisticated technology • theatre companies • theatre is an irreducible experience • viewing experiencevisceral experiencevisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MARCH 2014

Artist's spoof Ladybird book provokes wrath of Penguin

"An artist and comedian [Miriam Elia] has been told by the publisher Penguin that her new satirical art book breaches its copyright, and if she continues to sell copies it could use the courts to seize the books and have them pulped. ...

Elia's version sees them visiting an exhibition at a modern art gallery and grappling with existential questions about the nature of Tracey Emin–style conceptualist work, much of it peppered with distinctly adult imagery."

(Gareth Rubin, 2 March 2014, The Guardian)

1
2
3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

TAGS

1950s2014adult imageryart and designart galleryart gallery experienceartistartworkballoonballoon dog • Balloon Dog (Orange) • book illustrationBritish artcanvaschildrens bookchildrens book illustrationconceptual artcontemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscopyright • crucifix • empty room • feminist parodygod • God is dead • guiltinflatable • Jane • Jeff Koons • Ladybird Book • minimalist art • Miriam Elia • modern artmother • Mummy • NietzschenihilismparodyPenguin Random Housepenis • personal sacrifice • Peter • prettyreductionism • sacrifice • satiresexTate ModernThe GuardianTracey EminUKvagina • We Go To The Gallery (book)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2014

Energizing corporate culture through industrial musicals

1

TAGS

1950s1954aesthetic spectacleautomaker • awayday • boom time • business contextChevroletcollective values • company loyalty • corporate Americacorporate behaviourcorporate culturecorporate events • corporate image • corporate musical • economic boomenculturationenergizing corporate cultureentertainmentGeneral Motors • industrial musical • industrial propaganda • industrial show • industrial theatre • internal marketing • internal songbook • marketing practicesmusical theatreorganisational culturePrelinger Archivespromoting shared business contextpropagandasales and profitshow (spectacle) • song-and-dance • team day • team motivation • team-buildingtrade convention

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

Robert Peston Goes Shopping: shopping and the high street retailer

"In this new three–part BBC Two series, Robert Peston tells the colourful story of shopping in Britain since the Second World War. Using rarely seen archive and interviews with the key players of British retail, Peston explores how shopping has changed–and how it's changed us.

He tells the story behind some of our favourite high street stores, including Marks and Spencer, Sainsbury's and Tesco. He explains how we fell in love with shopping, but allowed the love affair to become too passionate, so much so that many of us ended up in chronic debt. And he shows how retail is now in the grips of a revolution as it attempts to come to terms with the rise of online shopping and the fallout of the financial crisis.

In the first episode, Seduction, Robert Peston tells how shopping in Britain was transformed from a chore to be endured into our favourite pastime. In the years of austerity and rationing after the Second World War, shopping was drab. There were long queues, yet there was little to buy.

But in the economic boom of the 1950s, consumerism took off. Marks and Spencer led the way with a mix of quality, value and customer service. From America came self–service supermarkets, which changed the way we shop. Then came out–of–town superstores–one–stop shops which fed the need for convenience as car ownership and the numbers of working women rose in the 1960s.

Clever retailers learned to adapt to cater for the new markets of the Sixties, Seventies and Eighties fashion boutiques: Chelsea Girl, for instance, catered for the emerging teenage market, while the career woman was served by Next.

By the 1980s, shopping had been transformed into a leisure activity–a fundamental shift confirmed by the opening of Britain's first large out–of–town shopping mall in 1986. Gateshead's MetroCentre was more than just a shopping centre–it was a leisure complex complete with restaurants, cinema, and even a fun fair. Shopping was king."

(BBC Media Centre)

1

TAGS

1950s1960s1980sASOSausterityBBC Two • car ownership • click and collect • consumerismconvenience • David Sainsbury • Dixonseconomic boomfinancial crisis • George Davies • high street shops • high street stores • Jane Snowball • leisure activity • leisure complex • m-commerceMarks and Spencer • Michael Aldrich • Mrs Snowball • multi-channel retailing • Next Retail Ltd • one-stop shops • online shopping • out-of-town • out-of-town superstores • pawnbroker • payday loan lender • rationing • retail historyretail storeretailers • Robert Peston • Robert Peston Goes Shopping (2013) • Sainsburys • self-service supermarket • shoppingshopping behaviourshopping centreshopping mallsocial shopping • Stanley Kalms • superstore • Teleputer • TescoUK • working women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.