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Which clippings match 'South-East Asia' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 MARCH 2015

Make informed purchasing decisions using Palm Oil barcode scanner

"POI (Palm Oil Investigations) has launched a Palm Oil barcode scanner for Australia and New Zealand products. ...

Scan the product barcode. Read the palm oil status. Select an alternative ethical product. Send a pre-written email to the company. Hit buy to compile ethical purchasing percentages and share your percentage to social media so you can show how you are making a difference.

Around 40% of products on supermarket shelves contain palm oil. Palm oil is a common ingredient in food (Biscuits, bakery items, Ice Cream, Chocolate, Confectionery, Crisps, Margarine, Health food bars, Cereals) etc. Derivatives of the oil are common in personal care products (Shampoo, Conditioner, Soaps, Skin care, Toothpaste) as well as household cleaning and detergents.

Rarely labelled by its correct name, palm oil is the hidden ingredient. There are over 200 names for palm oil its derivatives, the most common is the generic term vegetable oil. Other common names used in food production are emulsifier 471 and humectant glycerol."

(Palm Oil Investigations)

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TAGS

alternative ethical products • Android appsAotearoa New ZealandAustralia • bakery items • barcode scannerbarcode scanner appbiodiversitybiscuit • Borneo • cereals • certification status • chocolate • co-exist in the wild • confectionery • consumer advocacyconsumer products in homecrisps • critically endangered species • derivatives • detergentecosystem • El Paso Zoo • elephant • emulsifier • endangered speciesethical consumption • ethical palm oil supply • ethical purchasingextinction • facing extinction • free software • habitat loss • hair conditioner • health food bars • hidden ingredient • household detergents • humectant glycerol • ice cream • industry regulation • iOS appsmargarine • oil palm plantations • orangutanpalm oil • palm oil content • Palm Oil Investigations (POI) • palm oil scanner app • palm oil status • palm oil usage • personal care products • POI Palm Oil Barcode Scanner • product barcode • purchasing decisions • rhinorhinoceros • SE Asia • shampoo • skin care • soaps • South-East Asia • Spectrum Solutions • Sumatra • supermarket shelvessupply chaintiger • toothpaste • tropical forestvegetable oil • virgin rainforest

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 FEBRUARY 2015

The reality of shark fin soup served at Chinese wedding banquets

"The majority of the demand for shark meat is from the shark–fin industry, centered in Asia. Singapore is one of the main consumer countries, along with Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Malaysia and Thailand. For every Chinese wedding banquet in Singapore that serves shark fin soup, the world loses another 40–50 sharks."

(Animal Concerns Research and Education Society)

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TAGS

2012 • alpha predator • Animal Concerns Research and Education Society • animal cruelty • animal welfare • animated ad • anthropocentrism • apex predator • Asia-Pacificbarbaric practices • cartilage • Central America • Chinese soup spoon • Chinese wedding banquet • Costa Rica • crude barbarism • cruelty to animals • cultural practicesdestructive practicesethical consequencesethical consumption • fin • food productionhave dominion over all other living creaturesHong Kong • human supremacy • humane treatment of animals • inhumane treatment of animals • instrumental view of nature • Mainland China • MalaysiaPeoples Republic of Chinaporcelainredshark • shark fin soup • shark finning • shark meat • shark-fin industry • Singaporesoup • soup spoon • South-East Asia • spoon • status symbol • super predator • systemised crueltyTaiwanThailand • top predator • top-level predator • unnecessary suffering • video campaign • wanton destruction • wasteful destruction • wasteful practice • wedding banquet • wedding celebration • wedding ceremonywildlife reserveswillful ignorance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 AUGUST 2009

Prisoners of a White God: Akha culture under attack

"This documentary explicitly reveals under cover work of missionary agencies and individuals in the destruction of an ethnic group, the Akha people of South East Asia. It is a picture of evil cloaked in righteousness. Evangelical missionaries come with the Good News of the Gospel, and aid for the poverty stricken mountain people. The reality is division, destruction of family core groups, human rights violations, displacement, forced relocation, theft of land, cultural genocide, racism and power of a majority people group over the indigenous group.
...
[Tomáš] Ryška does an excellent job presenting the contrast of hypocrisy and wealth of the missionary, aid, food and clothing, the underworld of child trafficking versus the appearance of cleanliness and holiness, worship done the 'right' way, versus the 'pagan way.' He contrasts land theft, greed for the rich mountain resources, good business versus God's service. He uncovers the fear of eternal punishment versus the joys of heaven, fear of death threats for those who dare expose evil that dwells in the fundamentalist Christian missionary centres, corruption versus holiness, forced relocation, illness, depression, malaria, and prison camps in the lowlands for the unfortunate mountain people. It is colonization all over again."
(Akha Heritage Foundation)

TAGS

2008aid • Akha • autonomyChristiancommunitycorruptioncultural heritage • disempowerment • documentaryethicsethnicity • ethnocide • exploitationfaithFirst NationsfundamentalismglobalisationimperialismIndigenousIndigenous communitiesLaos • missionaries • missionarypagan • Prisoners of a White God • religionsocial changeSouth-East AsiaspiritualityThailand • Tomas Ryska • traditiontraffickingtransformationvillager

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JUNE 2009

Forged art legacy of Vietnam war

"How many of the paintings displayed at the Vietnamese National Museum of Fine Arts in Hanoi are originals and how many are copies?

That question has been a topic of hot discussion in Vietnam for quite some time.

It is well known among Vietnamese artists that the museum has been hanging works of art that are in fact copies of very famous Vietnamese paintings as some of the originals were either sold or lost.

The leading art historian and Vietnamese painting expert, Nora Taylor, from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, believes that about half of the paintings displayed at the museum are in fact copies.

According to Nguyen Do Bao, the former chairman of the Hanoi Fine Arts Association, the practice began with the best of intentions.

'The practice started during the war (between North and South Vietnam) in the 1960s. Copies were displayed at the museum while the originals were taken away to avoid being damaged during bombing raids,' he explained.

At the time it seemed a great idea, but the problem was that nobody seemed to be in control.

Not all of the original paintings were returned to the museum after the war."
(Ha Mi, 21 May 2009, BBC Vietnamese Service)

[Several museums say they have the original of Playing the O An Quan]

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TAGS

1960sauthenticityauthorshipfake artforgery • Hanoi • Hanoi Fine Arts Association • museum • Nguyen Do Bao • Nora Taylor • painting • Playing the O An Quan • School of the Art Institute of ChicagoSouth-East AsiaVietnamVietnam war • Vietnamese National Museum of Fine Arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

FOB Mixtape

In April 2008, FOB Mixtape brought their music to the Australian public in their first live show at Federation Square in Melbourne. Armed with 'music with a difference' but a modest budget, FOB Mixtape used the social networking website, MySpace to garner support and interest in their show. The band members created a promotional video and viral marketing: digital promotional strategies that are increasingly used by emerging and established artists to engage instantly with large audiences, without huge overheads. FOB Mixtape is an Australian hiphop group with a social conscience and their music aims to challenge racial stereotypes of Asian migrants in Australia. FOB Mixtape draw on their experiences as second generation migrants to write humorous lyrics such as 'I ain't the type of guy that you're used to seeing, the human being that's a few between a gook and a European'. The group takes a tongue and cheek look at the plight of being labelled an 'Asian' in Australia today, as seen in the group's name FOB Mixtape or 'Fresh Off the Boat'', which is immigrant slang used to describe newly arrived migrants. Recently featured on the SBS series mY Generation, FOB Mixtape can be seen as typical of Generation Y's expressing themselves through digitally sampled music, their ease with using online marketing – all of which was created in the basement of one of their parent's home. This experience of FOB Mixtape is an example of a new form of civic engagement that uses everyday, digital technologies to address some of the racial intolerances that exist in the culturally diverse societies of Australia today.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Mia Thornton
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