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Which clippings match 'Filmmaking' keyword pg.1 of 5
25 MARCH 2017

Lights Out: scary low-budget horror short film becomes feature

"Based on a short film made for a UK-based film challenge by Swedish director David F. Sandberg and his wife Lotta Losten, the two were more than surprised that their 162-second movie—that didn't win best film—went viral, generating the attention of millions, including Hollywood and famed horror producer James Wan."

(Catherine Chapman, 29 April 2016, The Creators Project)

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20132016bedroom • bedtime • blanket • bogeyman • bogieman • boogeyman • boogie man • continental quilt • creepy • David Sandberg • demonic presencedisturbing tale • doona • duvet • fear of the dark • fear of the unknownfilmmakinghiding in the darkhorror filmhorror genre • in the dark • James Wan • Lights Out (2013) • Lights Out (2016) • Lotta Losten • low-budget film • monster in the dark • mysterious presence • paranormal • scary • seeing things • short film • short horror film • sound and imagestrangerSwedish filmmaker • under the blanket • when the lights go out

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2017

MIT Open Documentary Lab: documentary is a project rather than a genre bound to a particular medium

"Drawing on MIT's legacy of media innovation and its deep commitment to open and accessible information, the MIT Open Documentary Lab brings storytellers, technologists, and scholars together to explore new documentary forms with a particular focus on collaborative, interactive, and immersive storytelling. The Lab understands documentary as a project rather than as a genre bound to a particular medium: documentary offers ways of exploring, representing, and critically engaging the world. It explores the potentials of emerging technologies and techniques to enhance the documentary project by including new voices, telling new stories and reaching new publics. ...

If we are indeed witnessing the emergence of a new form of representation, what can we broker from past moments of change to facilitate our move into the future? How can we evaluate this new work – what descriptive terminology and frameworks for assessment are most useful? What trends can we discern? What are the implications for style, authorship and the craft of filmmaking of these collaboratively sourced and edited moving images? And how can we work with our funding agencies, exhibition venues, and archival systems to give these new and often challenging practices a place in our cultural register?"

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collaborative storytellingdigital storytellingdocumentary experimentsdocumentary filmmakingdocumentary formdocumentary practice • documentary research • documentary series • emerging techniques • emerging technologiesfilmmakinghybrid forms • immersive storytelling • interactive documentary • interactive factual • interactive storytelling • media innovation • media maker • MIT Open Documentary Lab • new documentary forms • new publics • new stories • new voices • open and accessible information • reality-based storytelling • storytelling forms • the documentary subject • transmedia meta-documentary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 SEPTEMBER 2013

How to deal with the demands of the rapidly evolving new technology and yet further the aesthetics of our filmic art?

"With digital capture and even digital intermediates, it becomes very easy to think of the image in the simplest of terms: contrast, saturation and color bias. But I think too often we forget about texture and sharpness. Film has organic grain texture that simply doesn't exist in digital cinematography. I'm not a film 'purist' but I think it's safe to say that with the advent of radical advances in digital cinema technology there has been a certain homogenization of the cinematographic image in regard to look and texture. It is common to shoot for an evenly distributed rich digital negative (protect the highlights, see into the shadows) with plenty of sharpness to endure the color correction suite and create the look in post. Everybody shoots the sensor the same way.

Painting is a great influence on me. Whenever I can I go to museums and look at the classics, the Dutch masters, Rembrandt and Georges de la Tour. Looking at these old paintings can be inspiring. These are the basics for cameramen because we can learn lighting from them. We can study the classic paintings and try to use that technique of lighting in our photography. I have lots of picture books at home–photography books and art books. When we did McCabe and Mrs. Miller, I showed a book of Andrew Wyeth's paintings to Bob Altman and said, 'What do you think of these faded, soft, pastel images?' And he liked it. Then I took the same book to the lab and explained to them that this was what we were aiming for. They understood right away why we were flashing the film. So it helps; a picture is worth ten thousand words. A picture can immediately tell you your feelings about something.

With digital capture, we have been given a completely different set of tools, trading physical lab processes for computer–driven non–destructive techniques, creating possibilities for the image to be pushed any way we wish in post. In a time when film is disappearing fast and digital is making progress in image quality improvement, it has become important for cinematographers to master these new tools."

(Vilmos Zsigmond ASC HSC, IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers)

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aesthetics • American Society of Cinematgraphers (ASC) • Andrew Wyeth • ARRI Alexas • art of colour • available lightcamera technologycinematographycolour • colour bias • colour correctioncolour saturation • colourist • computer-driven techniques • digital capturedigital cinema technologydigital cinematography • digital intermediates • digital negativedigital picturesdigital progressdigital technology • European Federation of Cinematographers • faded images • film grain • film grain texture • film lighting • filmic art • filmmaking • Georges de La Tour • GoProimage contrast • image highlights • image manipulation • image quality • image shadows • image sharpness • image tone • IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers • iPhone cinematographyKodak Eastman • lab process • light exposure • look and texture • low lightmaking process • McCabe and Mrs Miller (1971) • mobile video productionnew technology • non-destructive techniques • organic grain texture • painting with light • pastel colours • post-productionpre-productionrapid technological changeRED ONERembrandt van Rijn • retraining • Robert Altman • soft image quality • Sony camerataste (sociology) • taste cultivation • taste formations • Vilmos Zsigmond • visual compositionvisual representation • visual richness • visual sensibilityvisual storytelling • visual texture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2012

An interview with the film editor Thelma Schoonmaker

David Poland/The DP/30 channel: posted Thursday 1st December 2011

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2011American cinemaart and design practitionerscreative practice • David Poland • DP/30 channel • filmfilm editingfilm editorfilm industryfilmmakingfilmmaking process • Hugo (2011) • interviews with designersMartin ScorseseMichael Powellpost productionpractitioner interview • Shutter Island (2010) • storytellingtextual reference • the other side of the camera • Thelma Schoonmaker • women in filmwomen in the film industry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

2nd Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation Symposium

"Mobile phones have evolved rapidly from a communication device to a creative and educational tool. The current mediascape can be described as a dynamic ecosystem that has seen the emergence of new media aesthetics and formats, such as iPhoneography and mobile–mentary (mobile documentary) filmmaking. For communities world–wide mobile technologies provide access to a vast amount of new services. (Mobile phone) users (or rather pro–d–users), artists, designers, filmmakers and independent creatives can define new modes of mobile media practices transcending the realm of established disciplines and transforming the contemporary mediascape. The participatory turn in media culture (collaboration, co–creation and crowd–sourcing) creates new opportunities and challenges for visual communication design. Mobile devices enable us to see the world from new viewpoints and angles."

(Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoa, 2012)

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2012 • 2nd Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation Symposium • Andrew Quitmeyer • Aotearoa New Zealand • Camille Baker • Daniel Mauro • Daniel Wagner • Dean Keep • design researcherfilmmaking • Gavin Wilson • International Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation SymposiumiPhoneographyLaurent AntonczakLynne CiochettoMax SchlesermediascapeMINAMINA2012Mobile Innovation Network Aotearoamobile mediamobile media practicesmobile phonemobile video production

CONTRIBUTOR

Max Schleser
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