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Which clippings match 'Uncertainty' keyword pg.1 of 2
15 AUGUST 2017

Cognitive closure and the price of certainty

"during times of fear and anxiety — like, for example, right now — everybody’s need for closure increases. We tend to make judgments more quickly, regardless of the facts. We’re also drawn to leaders who are decisive and paint solutions in simple terms. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Dr. Kruglanski and his team of researchers found that as the color-coded terrorism threat system increased, support for President George W. Bush went up accordingly. The more uncertain our world seems, the more we compensate by seeking out certainty."

(Daniele Anastasion, 1 November 2016, The New York Times)

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TAGS

2016 • alt-right • ambiguityappeal to emotion • Arie Kruglanski • be vigilant • binary thinking • cognitive closure • cognitive flexibilitycolour codingcomplex problem-solvingcomplexityconfused and disorientedconservatism • conservative thought • contradictory perspectivescritical thinking • Daniele Anastasion • decision-making capabilitiesdestabilised perceptionDonald Trump • Eric Strauss • exploiting fearsextremismfear mongeringfound to be true by manygaslightingGeorge W Bushgullibilityliberal tolerancemainstream medianationalism • need for certainty • need for closure • New York TimesOp-Docsperceptions of reality • personal agency • polarised politics • post-truth worldrhetorical fearscare tacticsscaremongeringSeptember 11 attacksshort documentarysimple evaluationssocial psychologysound judgmentspreading of fear • terrorism threat system • terrorist threat • times of fear and anxiety • truth • uncertain world • uncertainty • uncertainty avoidance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 DECEMBER 2015

Adam Curtis: our defeatist response to contradictory narratives

"So much of the news this year [2014] has been hopeless, depressing and above all confusing. To which the only response is 'Oh Dear' But what this film is going to suggest is that defeatist response has become a central part of a new system of political control and to understand how this is happening you have to look to Russia and to a man called Vladislav Surkov who is a hero of our time. Surkov is one of President Putin's advisors and has helped him maintain his power for fifteen years, but he has done it in a very new way. He came originally from the avant-garde art world and those who have studied his career say that what Surkov has done is import ideas from conceptual art into the very heart of politics."

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2014Adam CurtisAfghanistanapathyausterity measuresavant-garde art • Bashar al-Assad • bewildering • British troops • Chancellor of the Exchequer • Charlie Brooker • conceptual artconfusion tacticsconspiracy theoriesconstant changecontradictory narratives • contradictory vaudeville • controlcrimedaesh • defeatism • defeatist response • destabilised perceptiondisc jockey • ebola • economy • evil enemy • financial crimes • George Osbornehuman agencyhyperrealityincoherencemedia machine • non-linear war • non-linear world • perceptions of realitypolitical control • political strategy • post-traditional societypublic thought • quantitative easing • Russia • Russian politics • ruthless elite • shapeshiftingsimulacrasmokescreen • strategy of power • Syria • those in power • Ukraineuncertainty • undermine perceptions • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkovwhat is really happening

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 SEPTEMBER 2014

Engaging learners through uncertain rewards

"Uncertainty may be an important component of the motivation provided by learning games, especially when associated with gaming rather than learning. Three studies are reported that explore the influence of gaming uncertainty on engagement with computer– based learning games. In the first study, children (10–11 years) played a simple maths quiz. Participants chose their preferred reward for a correct answer prior to seeing each question. They could either receive a single point or toss an animated coin to receive 2 points for heads or none for tails. A preference for the uncertain option was revealed and this increased during the quiz. The second study explored the discourse around learning when pairs of participants (13–14 years) competed against the computer in a science quiz. Progress depended on the acquisition of facts but also on the outcomes of throwing dice. Discourse was characterised by a close intermingling of learning and gaming talk without salient problematic constructions regarding fairness when losing points due to gaming uncertainty. A final experiment explored whether, in this type of game, the uncertainty provided by the gaming component could influence players' affective response to the learning component. Electrodermal activity (EDA) of 16 adults was measured while they played the quiz with and without the element of chance provided by the dice. Results showed EDA when answering questions was increased by inclusion of gaming uncertainty. Findings are discussed in terms of the potential benefits of combining gaming uncertainty with learning and directions for further research in this area are outlined."

(Howard–Jones, P. A. and S. Demetriou, 2009)

1). Howard–Jones, P. A. and S. Demetriou (2009). "Uncertainty and Engagement with Learning Games." Instructional Science: An International Journal of the Learning Sciences 37(6): 519–536.

2). Paul Howard–Jones, 2014, radio programme, BBC Radio 4 – The Educators, episode 5 of 8, first broadcast: 10 September 2014.

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2009 • acquisition of facts • affective response • BBC Radio 4 • chance • chance outcome • coin toss • compelling engagement • competitioncomputer games • computer-based learning games • dopamine • educational neuroscience • educational psychologyeducational research • effective teaching • Electrodermal Activity (EDA) • fairnessgamblinggame-based learninggamificationgamifying learning and teaching • gaming uncertainty • learning and reward • learning and successlearning engagement • learning games • magnetic effect • memorymotivational needsneuroscience • neuroscience and education • our ability to learn • Paul Howard-Jones • prize • reward system • risk-taking • roulette wheel • running score • Skevi Demetriou • skill • sleep • The Educators (radio series) • throwing dice • transcranial electrical stimulation • uncertain options • uncertain rewards • uncertaintyvideo games

CONTRIBUTOR

Christa Van Raalte
22 OCTOBER 2012

Ars Electronica Festival: New Concepts for a New World

"THE BIG PICTURE is the theme of the [August 30 to September 3] 2012 Ars Electronica Festival ... Occupying the focal point is the effort to identify all–encompassing images that capture the world that's coming to be, Big Pictures that do justice to the progressive globalization and interrelatedness of our world, ones that capture its contradictions and flaws as well as ways in which people are coming together. By showcasing inspiring best–practice examples from art and science, this year's festival is a call for a new, open–minded way of considering the development of a viable vision of our future – how such a Big Picture ought to be composed and how it might become reality."

(Ars Electronica Festival, 2012)

Fig.1 work of Seiko Mikami "Desire of Codes"

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2012Ars ElectronicaArs Electronica Festivalart and sciencebecoming • best practice examples • big picturesbrave new world • coming to be • coming togethercontradiction and changecultural transformationgenius of the individualglobal crisis • global political stage • global vision • global warmingglobalisationglobalised world • hesitation • humankind • interrelatedness • isolationism • it will be OK • junk heap • media art • media art festival • natural sciences • necessary changes • networked world • new epoch • open-minded • our future • overspecialised nerd • progressive globalisation • reflexive modernisation • scientific expert • scientific insightssocial changesocial networks • team player • The Big Picture • the futurethresholdturbulenceuncertain environmentsuncertainty • universal genius • visions of the futureworld politics • world religions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2012

Trevor Hussey and Patrick Smith: The Uses of Learning Outcomes

"This paper argues that learning outcomes need to be reclaimed from their current use as devices for monitoring and audit, and returned to their proper use in aiding good teaching and learning. We require a broader, flexible and more realistic understanding of learning outcomes, better suited to the realities of the classroom and of practical use to those teachers who wish to respond to the enthusiasm of their students. To this end, a new model is produced that starts from the idea of an articulated curriculum, and embraces both intended and emergent learning outcomes. The model employs the distinction between predicted and unpredicted learning outcomes, together with the distinction between those that are desirable and those that are undesirable. The resulting account is intended to aid understanding of the nature and proper use of learning outcomes in teaching and learning."

(Trevor Hussey & Patrick Smith, p.357, 2003)

Trevor Hussey & Patrick Smith (2003). "The Uses of Learning Outcomes", Teaching in Higher Education, Vol. 8, No. 3, 2003, pp.357–368, ISSN 1356–2517 (print)/ISSN 1470–1294 (online)/03/030357–12, 2003 Taylor & Francis Ltd., DOI: 10.1080/1356251032000088574

TAGS

accountabilityadministriviaaid to understandingambiguityambiguity and uncertainty • articulated curriculum • auditaudit culture • auditing • best practicebureaucracy • constructive alignment • contiguous learning outcomes • corridor of tolerance • curriculum designcurriculum development • David Megginson • desirable outcomes • effective alignment • ELO • emergent curriculum • emergent learning outcomes • enhancing learning • experienced teachers • flexibility • good teaching and learning • higher education • ILO • incidental learning outcomes • indecisiveness • intended learning outcomes • John Biggs • learnerslearning and teaching • learning moments • learning outcomesmonitoring • Patrick Smith • pedagogic recontextualising fieldpedagogypractical usepredictability • predicted learning outcomes • QAA • realistic understanding • realities of the classroom • related learning outcomes • responding to enthusiasm • student enthusiasmstudent learningteachersteaching • Teaching in Higher Education (journal) • Trevor Hussey • uncertainty • unpredicted learning outcomes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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